– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter M ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Mm

 

Me . Mi . Mo . Mu . My

 

MA
 – For this acronym (as with all acronyms which do not spell a discernible word) we pronounce each letter as the name of that letter

– /ehm-ay/ – /ɛm.eiː/ – Notice also that there is no discernible stress –

MP3
– For this abbreviation, each letter and the one number are pronounced by their proper names individually

/ehm-pee-three//ɛm.piː.θɹiː/

Machine
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long “e”, and the final “e” is silent

– /muh-SHEEN//mə(ʌ).ˈʃiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Machine-Gun
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long “e”, the “e” is silent, the “G” is hard, and the “u” is short

– /muh-SHEEN-guhn//mə(ʌ).ˈʃiːn.gʌn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Machinery
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long “e”, the “e” disappears, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /muh-SHEE-n’r-ee//mə(ʌ).ʃiː.nɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Mad
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/mæ[d]/ – /mæ[ɾ]/ –

Made
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/mæ[d]/ – /mæ[ɾ]/ –

Madrid
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, and the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/muh-dʒRIH-[d]/ – /mə(ʌ).dʒɹɪ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Magazine
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “g” is hard, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

– /MæG-uh-zeen/ – /ˈmæg.ə(ʌ).ziːn/ – Notice also that the stress is (usually) on the first syllable (but it can also be on the third syllable) –

Magic
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-dʒihk/ – /ˈmæ.dʒə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Magistrate
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is a True Long A, the second “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/-dʒihs-chre[t]//ˈmæ.dʒə(ɪ)s.tʃɹe[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Magnifying
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “g” is hard, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “y” and the “i” of the “-ing” suffix (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MæG-nih-fai-ying//ˈmæg.nə(ɪ).faiː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mail
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

/mayl/ – /meɪl/ –

Mailing
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it),  and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAYL-ing/ – /meɪl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Main
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/mayn/ – /meiːn/ –

Mainly
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAYN-lee/ – /meiːn.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Maintain
 – For this word, the first “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthongthe second “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

– /mayn-TAYN//meiːn.ˈteiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Maintained
 – For this word, the first “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthongthe second “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and since the root word-ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /mayn-TAYN-d//meiːn.ˈteiːn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Maintenance
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MAYN[T]-nihns//ˈmeiːn[t].nə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Majestic
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muh-dʒEHS-tih[k]//mə(ʌ).ˈdʒɛs.tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Majority
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /muh-dʒOHR-ih-dee//mʌ.ˈdʒoɹ.ɪ.ɾɪ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Make
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and the final “e” is silent

/may-k/ – /me.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Makeshift
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “e” is silent, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/MAYK-shihf-[t]//ˈmek.ʃə(ɪ)f.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Malaysia
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /mə-LAY-zhuh//məl.ˈeiː.ʒə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Malaysian
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwathe “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /mə-LAY-zhihn//məl.ˈeiː.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Maldivan
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

/MAWL-dih-vihn//ˈmɔl.də(ɪ).və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Maldives
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MAWL-daiv-z//ˈmɔl.daiːv.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Male
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/mayl/ – /meɪl/ –

Mall
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/mawl/ – /mɔl/ –

Malleable
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAYL-ee-yuh-bəl//ˈmeɪl.iː.jə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Malls
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “s”

/mawl-z/ – /mɔl.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts like a second syllable –

Man
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/mæn/ – /mæn/ –

Manage
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-nih-dʒ//ˈmæ.nə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Manageable (Manage-able)
– For this word, the first “a” is short, for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-nih.dʒuh.bəl//ˈmæ.nə(ɪ).dʒə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Management
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-nihdʒ-mihn[t]//ˈmæ.nə(ɪ)dʒ.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Management‘s
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-nihdʒ-mihn-ts/ – /ˈmæ.nə(ɪ)dʒ.mə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Manager
 – For this word the first “a” is short, for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” combines with the “-er” suffix, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-nih-dʒ’r/ – /ˈmæ.nə(ɪ).gɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Managerial
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-nih-dʒEER-ee-əl/ – /ˌmæ.nə(ɪ).ˈdʒiːɹ.iː.əl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Managers/’s/s
 – These words (whether plural, possessive, or plural-possessive) are all pronounced the same – The first “a” is short, for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” combines with the “-er” suffix, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /-nih-dʒ’r-z//ˈmæn.ə(ɪ).dʒɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Managing
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-nih-dʒing//ˈmæ.nə(ɪ).dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mandatory
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ory” suffix – the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the common pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MæN-də-tohr-ee//ˈmæn.də.toɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Manipulate
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mə-NIH-pyoo-lay[t]/ – /mə.ˈnɪ.pju.le[iː][t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Manipulated
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/mə-NIH-pyoo-lay-dih[d]/ – /mə.ˈnɪ.pju.leiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Manipulation
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muh-nih-pyoo-LAY-shihn/ – /mə(ʌ).ˌnə(ɪ).pjuˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress is on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Mankind (Man-kind)
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “i” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /mæn-KAIN-[d]/ – /mæn.kaiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Manner
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/-n’r/ – /ˈmæ.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Manual
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MæN-yoo-əl/ – /ˈmæn.ju.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Manufacture
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is also short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ture” suffix –the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /mæn-yoo-[K]-ch’r//ˌmæn.ju.ˈfæ[k].tʃɚ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress is on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Manufacturer
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ture” suffix –the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the “e” combines with the “-er” ending, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mæn-yoo-[K]-ch’r-r’r//mæn.ju.ˈfæ[k].tʃɚ.ɹɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that there is a phantom letter “r” in-between the first “r” and the disappearing “e”, this is only to make it possible to distinguish between the two “r” sounds –

Manufacturing
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mæn-yoo-[K]-ch’r-ing/ – /ˌmæn.ju.ˈfæ[k].tʃɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and the major stress is on the third syllable –

Manure
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, there is a phantom-w in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/mə-NOO-w’r//mə.ˈnu.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Many
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “e”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MEH-nee/ – /ˈmɛ.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Map
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/mæ-[p]/ – /mæ.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” (when not stopped) ending acts as a second syllable –

Marathon
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the “o” is short

/MAYR-uh-thahn//ˈmeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).θɑn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

March
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/mahr-ch//mɑɹ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Marginalize
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAHR-dʒihn-ə-laiz/ – /ˈmɑɹ.dʒə(ɪ)n.ə.laiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Marginalized
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/MAHR-dʒihn-əl-aiz-d/ – /ˈmɑɹ.dʒə(ɪ)n.əl.aiːz.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Marijuana
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ju” combination is pronounced like the letter “w”, the first “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/mayr-ih-WAW-nuh/ – /ˌmeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)ˈwɔ.nə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Marital
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAYR-ih-dəl/ – /ˈmeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Mark
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/mahr-k//mɑɹ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Market
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/MAHR-kih[t]/ – /ˈmɑɹ.kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Marketing
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MAHR-kih-ding//ˈmɑɹ.kə(ɪ).ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Marriage
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ia” combination is turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/MAYR-idʒ/ – /ˈmeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Marriages
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ia” combination turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the final “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MAYR-ih-dʒihz/ – /ˈmeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Married
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “i” (converted from the letter “y” due to the addition of the suffix) – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d, but is (often) stopped

/MAYR-ee[d]/ – /ˈmeɪɹ.iː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Marry
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MAYR-ee//ˈmeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Marvelous
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MAHR-və-lihs//ˈmɑɹ.və.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mask
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “k” is (sometimes) stopped

/mæ-s[k]//ˈmæ.s[k]/ – Notice also that the “sk” ending acts as a second syllable

Mass
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/mæs//mæs/

Massacre
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the final “e” is silent

– /-sə-k’r/ – /ˈmæs.ə.kɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Massage
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “e” is silent (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /muh-SAHZH/ – /mə(ʌ).ˈsɑʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Massaging
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” sounds like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /muh-SAH-zhing/ – /mə(ʌ).ˈsɑ.ʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Massive
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-sihv//ˈmæ.sɪv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Master
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MæS-t’r//ˈmæs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Match
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/mæ-ch//mæ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Matches
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/-chihz//ˈmæ.tʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Matching
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-ching//ˈmæ.tʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mate
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/may[t]//me[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Material
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muh-TEER-ee-yəl//mə(ʌ).ˈtiːɹ.iː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Materials
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/muh-TEER-ee-yəl-z/ – /mə(ʌ).ˈtiːɹ.iː.jəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Maternal
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muh-T’R-nəl//mə(ʌ).ˈtɚ.nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Maternity
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muh-T’R-nih-dee/ – /mə(ʌ).ˈtɚ.nə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Math
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/mæth//mæθ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Mathematician
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “th” combination in un-voiced, the “e” disappears, the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the third “a” turns into an i-schwa

/mæ-th-mə-TIH-shihn//mæ.θ.mə.ˈtɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Mathematics
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mæ-thə-Mæ-dih-ks//ˌmæ.θə.ˈmæ.ɹə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Matrix
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

– /MAY-trih-ks//ˈmeiː.tʃɹə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable –

Matter
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t, (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

– /-d’r//ˈmæ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Matthew
 – For this name, the “a” is short, the “tth” combination is pronounced simply like the un-voiced “th” combination, and the “ew” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/MæTH-yoo//ˈmæθ.ju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Maximum
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “u” is a u-schwa

/MæK-sih-muhm//ˈmæk.sə(ɪ).mə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

May
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /may//meiː/

Maybe
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the True Long “A” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is long

/MAY-bee//ˈme.biː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mayor
 – For this word, the “a” is long, the “y” takes the consonant sound, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MAY-y’r//ˈmeiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mazes
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” turns into an i-schwa and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MAY-zihz//ˈmeiː.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Me

Me
 – For this word, the “e” is long

/mee//miː/

Meal
 – For this word, the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/MEE-əl//ˈmiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mean
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/meen//miːn/

Meaning
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEE-ning//ˈmiː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Means
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/meen-z//miːn.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Meant
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /mehn-[t]//mɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Meanwhile
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “w” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” and a phantom-schwa in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/MEEN-wai-yəl//ˈmiːn.waiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Measure
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” silent

/MEH-zh’r//ˈmɛ.ʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Measurement
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-zh’r-mihn-[t]//ˈmɛ.ʒɚ.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Measures
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, the second “e” silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MEH-zh’r-z//ˈmɛ.ʒɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

Meat
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/mee-[t]//ˈmiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable  –

Mechanic
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is
(sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mih--nih[k]//mə(ɪ).ˈkæ.nə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Mechanical
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is
(sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mih--nih-kəl//mə(ɪ).ˈkæ.nə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Mechanics / ‘s / s’
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mih--nih-ks//mə(ɪ).ˈkæ.nə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Media
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /MEE-dee-yuh//ˈmiː.ɾiː.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mediator
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “o” disappears

/MEE-dee-yay-d’r/ – /ˈmiː.ɾiː.je.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Medical
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-dih-kəl//ˈmɛ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Medication
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/meh-dih-KAY-shihn//ˌmɛ.ɾə(ɪ).ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Medicine
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/MEH-dih-sihn//ˈmɛ.ɾə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first

Medieval
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mihd-EE-vəl/ – /mə(ɪ)ɾ.ˈiː.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Mediocre
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, and the final “e” is silent

/mee-dee-OH-k’r//miː.ɾiː.ˈjo.kɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Meditating
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-dih-tay-ding/ – /ˈmɛ.ɾə(ɪ).te.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Meditation
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-dih-tay-shihn/ – /ˈmɛ.ɾə(ɪ).te.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mediterranean
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the third “e” is long, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /meh-dih-t’r-AY-nee-ihn//ˌmɛ.ɾə(ɪ).tɚ.ˈeiː.niː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that  there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that  the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Medium
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “u” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “u” is a u-schwa

/MEE-dee-yuhm//ˈmiː.ɾiː.jə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Meet
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/mee-[t]//miː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Meeting
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MEE-ding//ˈmiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Meets
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/mee-ts//miː.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Mega-Cities
 – For this compound word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “C” is soft, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MEH-guh-sih-deez//ˈmɛ.gə(ʌ).sə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Meld
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/mehl[d]//ˈmɛl[d]/

Melding
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounce like in the word “sing” or “ring” (This is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEHL-ding//ˈmɛl.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Melodic
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mə-LAH-dih[k]/ – /mə.ˈlɑ.ɾə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Melt
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/mehl-[t]//mɛl.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Meltdown
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/MEH[T]-down//mɛl[t].dɑun/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Member
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” disappears

/MEHM-b’r//ˈmɛm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Membership
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ship” suffix – the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is an
i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEHM-b’r-shih[p]//ˈmɛm.bɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Memoir
 – For this word, the “e” is short, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the second letter “m” and the “o”, and the “oi” combination is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/MEHM-wahr//ˈmɛm.wɑɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first stress

Memorandum
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” disappears, the “a” is short, and the final “u” turns into a u-schwa

/meh-m’r-æN-duhm/ – /ˌmɛ.mɚ.ˈæn.də(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Memorial
 – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/meh-MOHR-ee-əl//mɛ.ˈmoɹ.iː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Memory
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MEH-muh-ree//ˈmɛ.mə(ʌ).ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mental
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEHN-təl//ˈmɛn.təl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mentality
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “a” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /mehn--lih-dee//mɛn.ˈtæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Mentally
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “l” combines with the “-ly” ending and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEHN-tə-lee//ˈmɛn.tə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mention
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEHN-shihn//ˈmɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mentioned
 – For this word, the “e” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/MEHN-shihn-d/ – /ˈmɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mentor
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “o” is long

/MEHN-tohr//ˈmɛn.toɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Menu
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/MEHN-yoo//ˈmɛn.ju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mercedes
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is pronounced like a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, the last letter “e” is long, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /m’r-SAY-deez//mɚ.se.ɾiːz/ – Noticed also that the stress is on the second syllable

Mere
– For this word, the first “e” is long, and the second “e” is silent

/meer//miːɹ/

Merely
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MEER-lee//ˈmiːɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Merge
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /m’r-dʒ//mɚ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable –

Merged
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and, according to the rules of the pronunciation of the “-ed” ending, the “d” should be pronounced normally, however, as we pronounce it naturally it actually sounds like the letter “t”

– /m’rdʒ-t//mɚdʒ.t/ –  Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Merger
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /M’R-dʒr//ˈmɚ.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mergers
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “g” is soft, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /M’R-dʒr-z//ˈmɚ.dʒɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Mesh
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/meh-sh//mɛ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” combination acts as a second syllable

Mesmerism
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MEHZ-m’r-ih-zəm//ˈmɛz.mɚ.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mesmerizing
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, the “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MEHZ-m’r-ai-zihŋ//ˈmɛz.mɚ.aiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mesopotamia
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “a” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/meh-sə-pə-TAY-mee-yuh//mɛ.sə.pə.ˈt/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable

Mess
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/mehs//mɛs/

Message
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-sihdʒ//ˈmɛ.sə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Messaging
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is dropped (this is due to the addition of the “-ing” suffix), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-sih-dʒɪŋ//ˈmɛ.sə(ɪ).dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Messy
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MEH-see//ˈmɛ.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Met
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /meh[t]//mɛ[t]/ –

Metal
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MEH-d’l//ˈmɛ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Metaphor
 – For this word, the “e’ is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-or” suffix – the “o” is long (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MEH-duh-fohr//ˈmɛ.ɾə(ʌ).foɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Metaphors
 – For this word, the “e’ is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-or” suffix – the “o” is long (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounce almost like the letter “z”

– /MEH-duh-fohr-z//ˈmɛ.ɾə(ʌ).foɹ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Meter
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the second “e” disappears

/MEE-d’r//ˈmiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Meters
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MEE-d’rz/ – /miː.ɾɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Meteor
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “o” disappears

/MEE-dee-y’r//ˈmiː.ɾiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Meteorite
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “o” disappears, and for the “ite” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/MEE-dee-y’r-igh[t]//ˈmiː.ɾiː.jɚ.ʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Method
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/MEH-thih[d]/ – /ˈmɛ.θə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Methodical
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /meh-THAH-dih-kəl//mɛ.θɑ.ɾɪ.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Metric
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-chrih[k]//ˈmɛ.tʃɹə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Metrics
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEH-chrih-ks//ˈmɛ.tʃɹə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable

Metropolis
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the letter “r” directly after it), the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “i” is an i-schwa

/mih-CHRAH-pə-lihs//mɛ.tʃɹɑ.pə.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Metropolises
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the letter “r” directly after it), the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/mih-CHRAH-pə-lih-sihs//mɛ.tʃɹɑ.pə.lə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Metropolitan
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the letter “r” directly after it), the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /meh-chrə-PAH-lih-tihn//ˌmɛ.tʃɹə.ˈpɑ.lə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that  there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Mexico
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the final “o” is long

/MEK-sih-koh/ – /ˈmɛk.sə(ɪ).ko/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mi

Mic
– For this abbreviation, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/migh-[k]//mʌiː.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Mice
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /migh-s//mʌiː.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

Micro-
 – For this word or prefix, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is hard, and the final “o” is long

– /MIGH-kroh//ˈmʌiː.kɹo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable 

Microphone (micro-Phone)
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is hard, the first “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation for this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/MIGH-kruh-fohn//ˈmʌiː.kɹə(ʌ).fon/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Microphones (micro-Phones)
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is hard, the first “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation for this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MIGH-kruh-fohn-z//ˈmʌiː.kɹə(ʌ).fon.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Mid-
 – For this prefix, the “i” is short, and the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/mih[d]/ – /mɪ[ɾ]/ –

Mid-Day
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the first “d” is a flap-d but is stopped, the second “d” is pronounced as normal, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/MIH[D]-day//ˈmɪ[ɾ].de/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Middle
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply like the single a flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “d” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /MIH-dəl//ˈmɪ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Midnight (mid-Night)
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night” or “light” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/MIH[D]-nigh[t]//ˈmɪ[ɾ].nʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Might
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word, “night” or “flight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/migh[t]//mʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Migraine
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, the “g” is hard, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/MAI-grayn//ˈmaiː.gɹeiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Migraines
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, the “g” is hard, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “es” suffix – the “e” is silent and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MAI-grayn-z//ˈmaiː.gɹeiːn.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Milan
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/mih-LAHN//mə(ɪ).ˈlɑn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Mild
 – For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” and phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/MAI-yəl-[d]//ˈmaiː.jəl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Mile
 – For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” and phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/MAI-yəl//ˈmaiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Milestone (Mile-Stone)
– For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” and phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the first “e” is silent

/MAI-yəl-stohn//ˈmaiː.jəl.ston/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Milestones (Mile-Stones)
– For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” and phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the first “e” is silent, the “o” is long, the second “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MAI-yəl-stohn-z//ˈmaiː.jəl.ston.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Military
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MIH-lih-tayr-ee//ˈmɪ.lə(ɪ).teɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Milk
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “k” is (sometimes) stopped

/mihl-[k]//mɪl.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Milligram (milli-Gram)
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the “a” is short

/MIH-lih-græm//ˈmɪ.lə(ɪ).gɹæm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Millimeter (milli-Meter)
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the first “e” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the second “e” disappears

/MIH-lih-mee-d’r//ˈmɪ.lə(ɪ).miː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Million
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the consonant form of the letter “y”, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/MIHL-yihn//ˈmɪl.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Millionaire
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-aire” suffix – the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/MIHL-yihn-ayr//ˈmɪl.jə(ɪ)n.eɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Millions
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the consonant form of the letter “y”, the “o” turns into a i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /MIHL-yihn-z/ – /ˈmɪl.jə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mind
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/main-[d]//maiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Mindset (Mind-set)
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /MAIN[D]-seh[t]//ˈmaiːn[d].sɛ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Mine
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/main//maiːn/

Mineral
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-n’r-əl//ˈmɪ.nɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mines
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/man-z//maiːn.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Miniature
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-nee-ə-ch’r//ˈmɪ.niː.ə.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Minimize
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MIH-nih-maiz//ˈmɪ.nɪ.maɪz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Minimum
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the “u” is a u-schwa

/MIH-mih-muhm//ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ)mə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Minister
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this
suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-nih-st’r/ – /ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ).stɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ministry
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MIH-mihs-chree//ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ)s.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Minor
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAI-n’r//ˈmaiː.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Minority
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” is long (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the
final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mai-NOHR-ih-dee//maiː.ˈnoɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Minute (adjective)
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “u” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/mai-NOO[T]//maiː.ˈnu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Minute (noun)
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/MIH-nih[t]//ˈmɪ.nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Minutes
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, and the “e” is silent

– /MIH-nih-ts//ˈmɪ.nɪ.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Miracle
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa, in-between the “c” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

/MEERih-kəl/ – /ˈmiːɹ.ə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Miraculous
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/m’r-æ-kyou-lihs/ – /mɚ.ˈæ.kju.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Miraculously
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/m’r-æ-kyou-lihs-lee/ – /mɚ.ˈæ.kju.lə(ɪ)s.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mirror
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “rr” combination is pronounced like two separate letters “r” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue and is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MEER-r’r//ˈmiːɹ.ɹɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Misbehave (miss-Behave)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/mihs-bee-HAYV/ – /ˌmə(ɪ)s.biː.ˈheiːv/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that  the major stress is on the third syllable –

Misbehaving (miss-Behaving)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mihs-bee-HAY-ving/ – /ˌmə(ɪ)s.biː.ˈheiː.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that  the major stress is on the third syllable –

Miscalculating (miss-Calculating)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “c” is hard, the first “a” is short, the second “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /mihs-KæL-kyou-lay-ding//mɪs.ˈkæl.kju.leiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Misdemeanor (miss-Demeanor)
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIHS-də-mee-n’r/ – /ˈmɪs.də.miː.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Miserable
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” disappears, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-z’ruh-bəl//ˈmɪzɚ(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mislead (miss-Lead)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /mihs-LEE[D]//mɪs.ˈliː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Misleading (miss-Leading)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /mihs-LEE-ding//mɪs.ˈliː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Misnomer (miss-Nome-er)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mihs-NOH-m’r/ – /mə(ɪ)s.ˈno.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Miss
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/mihs//mɪs/

Missed
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /mihs-[t]/ – /mɪs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Misses
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-es” ending – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MIH-sihz//ˈmɪ.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Missing
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-sing//ˈmɪ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mistake (miss-Take)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and the final “e” is silent

/mihs-TAYK//mə(ɪ)s.ˈtek/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Mistaken (miss-Taken)
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard
pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mihs-TAY-kihn//mə(ɪ)s.ˈte.kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Mitigate
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “t” is a flap-t, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-dih-gay[t]//ˈmɪ.ɾə(ɪ).ge[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mitigation
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “t” is a flap-t, the “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mih-dih-GAY-shihn//mɪ.ɾə(ɪ).ˈgeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Mix
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/mih-ks//mɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

Mixed
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/MIH-ks-[t]//ˈmɪ.ks.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Mixture
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combinationand for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MIH-ks-ch’r/ – /ˈmɪ.ks.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mo

Mobile
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the “i” can either be long, or is turns into a phantom-schwa, and in both versions, the “e” is silent

– /MOH-bail/ – /ˈmo.baiːl/  – Or –  /MOH-bəl//ˈmo.bəl/ – Notice also that (in both pronunciations) the stress is on the first syllable

Mockumentary
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “e” is short, and for the “-ary” suffix” – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mahk-you-MEHN-t’-ree/ – /ˌmɑk.ju.ˈmɛn.tɚ.iː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that  the major stress is on the third syllable

Model
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/MAH-dəl//ˈmɑ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Modern
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “e” disappears

/MAH-d’rn//ˈmɑ.ɾɚn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Modest
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAH-dihs-[t]//ˈmɑ.ɾə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Moisture
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears

– /MOYS-ch’r//ˈmɔɪs.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Moisturize
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it)the “u” disappears, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MOYS-ch’r-aiz//ˈmɔɪs.tʃɚ.aiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Moisturizer
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “i” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MOYS-ch’r-ai-z’r//ˈmɔɪs.tʃɚ.aɪ.zɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mom
 – For this word, the “o” is short

/mah-m//mɑ.m/ – Notice also that the “m” ending acts as a second syllable

Moment
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/MOH-mihn-[t]//ˈmo.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Momentous
 – For this word, the first “o” is long, the “e” is short, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is
the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/moh-MEHN-tihs//mo.ˈmɛn.tə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Momentum
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” is short, and the “u” turns into a u-schwa

– /moh-MEHN-tuhm//mo.ˈmɛn.tə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Mommy
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MAH-mee//ˈmɑ.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Monday
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/MUHN-day//ˈmʌn.deiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Money
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “ey” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

– /MUH-nee//ˈmʌ.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Monitor
 – For this word, the first “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MAH-nih-t’r//ˈmɑ.nə(ɪ).tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Monitoring
 – For this word, the first “o” is short, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MAH-nih-t’ring//ˈmɑ.nə(ɪ).tɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Monkey
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and the “ey” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/MUNG-kee//ˈmʌŋ.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress in on the first syllable

Monopoly
 – For this word, the first “o” disappears, the second “o” is short, the third “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/m’-NAH-pə.lee/ – /m’nɑ.pə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Monotonous
 – For this word, the first “o” disappears, the second “o” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, the third “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /mih-NAH-[t]ih-nihs//mə(ɪ).ˈnɑ.[t]ə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Monsieur
 – For this word, the “on” combination turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the “eu” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “u”

/mih-SYOOR//mə(ɪ).ˈsjur/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Month
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

– /muhn-th/ – /mʌn.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Monthly
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MUHN-th-lee//ˈmʌn.θ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Months
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

– /muhn-ths/ – /mʌn.θs/ – Notice also that the “ths” ending acts as a second syllable –

Mood
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped,

/moo[d]//mu[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as a second syllable

Moon
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/moon//mun/

Moose
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/moos//mus/

Moral
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOHR-əl//ˈmoɹ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Morale
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/mə-RæL//mə.ˈɹæl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Morally (Moral-ly)
– For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOHR-ə-lee//ˈmoɹ.ə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Moratorium
 – For this word, the first “o” is long the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the second “o” is long, and the for the “-ium” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “u” is a u-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mohr-ih-TOHR-ee-uhm//ˌmoɹ.ə(ɪ).ˈtoɹ.iː.ə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

More
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/mohr//moɹ/

Moreover (more-over)
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the first “e” is silent, the second “o” is long, and the second “e” disappears

/mohr-OH-v’r//moɹˈo.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Morning
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOHR-ning/ – /ˈmoɹ.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mortality (Mortal-ity)
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “a” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mohr--lih-dee//moɹ.ˈtæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Mortgage
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is silent, the first “g” is hard, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MOHR-gih-dʒ//ˈmoɹ.gə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable –

Mosque
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k” but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /mahs-[k]/ – /mɑs.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Mosques
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, and the “e” is silent

– /mahs-ks/ – /mɑs.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable –

Most
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/moh-s[t]//mo.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a second syllable

Mostly
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOHS[T]-lee-//ˈmos[t]-lee/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mother
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MUH-th’r//ˈmʌ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mothers/’s/s’
 – For this word (whether plural, possessive, or plural-possessive), the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/MUH-th’rz//ˈmʌ.ðɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mother-Ship
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” combination is voiced,, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), then the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/MUH-th’r-shih[p]//ˈmʌ.ðɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Motion
 – For this word, the first “o” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOH-shihn//ˈmo.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Motivate
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is short, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent, (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /MOH-dih-vay[t]//ˈmo.ɾɪ.ve[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Motivated
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” joins with the “-ed” ending, and since the root word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /MOH-dih-vay-dih[d]//ˈmo.ɾɪ.veiː.ɾə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Motivating
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the first “t” is a flap-t, the first “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” is dropped to add the “-ing”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOH-dih-vay-ding//ˈmo.ɾɪ.veiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Motivation
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the first “t” is a flap-t,for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” is dropped to add the “-tion”, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mo-dih-VAY-shihn//mo.ɾɪ.ˈveiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Motor
 – For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOH-d’r//ˈmo.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Motorbike (motor-Bike)
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/MOH-d’r-bigh-k//ˈmo.ɾɚ.bʌiː.k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Motorcycle (motor-Cycle)
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the first “c” is soft, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

– /MOH-d’r-sigh-k’l//ˈmo.ɾɚ.sʌiː.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mount
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like t”ow” combination, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/mown-[t]//ˈmɑun.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Mountain
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the “ai” combination turns into an i-schwa, however, if the “t” is stopped, then the “ai” combination disappears

– /MOWN-tihn//ˈmaun.tə(ɪ)/  – Or – /MOWN-‘n/ – /ˈmaun.ʔn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mountains
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “ai” combination turns into an i-schwa, however, if the “t” is stopped, then the “ai” combination disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /MOWN-[t]ihn-z/ – /ˈmaun.[t]ə(ɪ)n.z/ –Or – /MOWN-‘n-z/ – /ˈmaun.ʔn.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Mouse
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/mows//mɑus/

Mouth
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “th” combination is un-voiced

/mow-th//mɑu.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Move
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/moo-v//mu.v/ – Notice also that the “v” ending acts as a second syllable

Moved
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/moov-[d]//muv.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Movement (Move-ment)
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOOV-mihn-[t]//ˈmuv.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Movie
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/MOO-vee//ˈmu.viː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Moving
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MOO-ving//ˈmu.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mozart
 – For this name, the “o” is long, the “z” is pronounced like a “ts” combination, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

– /MOHTS-ahr-[t]/ – /ˈmots.ɑɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Mr.
 – This abbreviation is pronounced as the word “Mister”

/MIH-st’r//ˈmɪs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mrs.
 – This abbreviation is pronounced…  “Misses”

/MIH-sihz//ˈmɪ.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ms.
 – This abbreviation is pronounced…  “Miz”

/mihz//ˈmɪz/

 

Mu

Much
 – For this word, the “u” is short

/muh-ch//mʌ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Mud
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/muh-[d]//mʌ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Mugged
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” but is (often) stopped (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root word ends with the letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/muh[g]-d/ – /mʌ[g].d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable –

Mugging
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muh-ging/ – /mʌ.gɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable –

Muggy
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MUH-gee//ˈmʌ.giː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Multi-
 – For this prefix, the “u” is short, and the “i” is long

/MUHL-tai//ˈmʌl.taiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Multi-Lateral
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is long, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/muhl-tai--d’r-əl//ˌmʌl.taiː.ˈlæ.ɾɚ.əl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Multi-Media
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the first “i” is long, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/muhl-tai-MEE-dee-yuh//ˌmʌl.taiː.ˈmiː.ɾiː.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Multi-National
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is long, the “a” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/məl-tai--shih-nəl//ˌmʌl.taiː.ˈnæ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Multiple
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /MUHL-tih-pəl/ – /ˈmʌl.tə(ɪ).pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Multiply
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i” (this is not standard pronunciation of the “ly” ending)

/MUHL-tih-plai//ˈmʌl.tə(ɪ).plaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mum
 – For this word, the “u” is short

/muh-m//ˈmʌ.m/ – Notice also that the “m” ending acts as a second syllable

Mundane
 – For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/muhn-DAYN//mʌn.ˈdeiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Municipality
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /myou-nih-sih--lih-dee//ˌmju.nɪ.cɪ.ˈpæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that  the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Mural
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MYOO-rəl/ – /ˈmju.ɹəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Murder
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the d is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /M’R-d’r//ˈmɚ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Muscle
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “sc” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “sc” combination and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” silent

/MUH-səl//ˈmʌ.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Muscles
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “sc” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “sc” combination and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /MUH-səl-z//ˈmʌ.səl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Muscular
 – For this word, the first “u” is short, the “c” is hard, the second “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “a” disappears

/MUHS-kyou-l’r/ – /ˈmʌs.kju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Museum
 – For this word, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” is long, and the second “u” is a u-schwa

/myoo-ZEE-uhm//mju.ˈziː.ə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Museums
 – For this word, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” is long, the second “u” is a u-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/myoo-ZEE-uhm-z//mju.ˈziː.ə(ʌ)m.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Music
 – For this word, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MYOO-zih[k]//ˈmju-zə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Musical
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MYOO-zih-kəl/ – /ˈmju.zə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Musician
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /myoo-ZIH-shin//mju.ˈzɪ.ʃɪn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Musicians/‘s/s’
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /myoo-ZIH-shin-z//mju.zɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Muslim
 – There are two common pronunciations for this word:  1. The “u” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “i” turns into an i-schwa.  2. The “u” turns into a true-schwa, and the “i” turns into an i-schwa

– /MUHZ-lihm//ˈmʌz.lə(ɪ)m/  –  Or  –  /MOOS-lihm//ˈmus.lə(ɪ)m/ – Notice also that, in both version, the stress is on the first syllable

Mussel
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

– /MUH-səl//ˈmʌ.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Mussels
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /MUH-səl-z//ˈmʌ.səl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Must
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/muh-s[t]//ˈmʌ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Mustang
 – For this word, the “u” us short, the “a” is short, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MUHS-tæng/ – /ˈmʌs.tæŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Mustard
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “a” disappears, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/MUHS-t’r-[d]//ˈmʌs.tɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “d” (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Mutation
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination sounds like the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /myooTAY-shihn//mju.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Mutual
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/MYOO-choo-əl//ˈmju.tʃu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

My

My
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/mai//maiː/

Myriad
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/MEER-ee-ih[d]//ˈmiːɹ.iː.ə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Myself (My-Self)
– For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, and the “e” is short

/mai-SEHL-f//maiː.ˈsɛl.f/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Mysterious
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is
the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/mih-STEER-ee-ihs//mɪ.ˈstiːɹ.iː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Mystery
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/MIH-st’r-ee//ˈmɪ.stɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Myth
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounce like the short letter “i”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/mih-th//mɪ.th/ – Notice that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Myths
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/mih-ths//mɪ.ths/ – Notice also that the “ths” ending acts as a second syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter M ) –


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