– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter N ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Nn

 

Ne . Ni . No . Nu

 

Nag
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “g” is hard

/næg//næg/

Nail
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

/na-yl//ne.ɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Naive
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the letter “a” and the letter “i”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/nai-YEEV//naiː.ˈjiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Naked
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/NAY-kih[d]/ – /ˈneiː.kə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Name
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/naym/ – /neiːm/ –

Named
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /naym-[d]//neiːm.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Nantes
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, there is a phantom letter “l” in-between the “a” and the second “n” (this is due to the fact that it is the name of a French city and therefore should be pronounced as closely to the French as is possible for the person speaking), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is silent

/na[l]nt/ – /nɑ[l]nt/ –

Napoleon
 – For this name, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is long, the “e” is long, and the last “o” turns into a i-schwa

– /nuh-POH-lee-ihn//nə(ʌ).ˈpo.liː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Narrow
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o” – This is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/NAYR-oh/ – /ˈneɪɹ.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Narrowed
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o” – This is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “o” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/NAYR-oh-[d]/ – /ˈneɪɹ.o.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

NASA
 – For this acronym, the first “A”, is short, and the second “A” turns into a u-schwa

/-suh/ – /ˈnæ.sə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Nation
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/NAY-shihn/ – /ˈneiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

National
 – For this word, the “a” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/-shih-nəl/ – /ˈnæ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Nationalities
 – For this word, the “a” is short, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the second “a” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/næ-shihn--lih-deez/ – /næ.ʃə(ɪ).ˈnæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Native
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /NAY-dihv//ˈneiː.ɾɪv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Natural
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-ch’r-əl/ – /ˈnæ.tʃɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Naturalistic (Natural-ist-ic)
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is short (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common  Tongue), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/.ch’r.əl.IHS-tih[k]//ˌnæ.tʃɚ.əl.ˈɪs.tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Naturally
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/-chruh-lee/ – /ˈnæ.tʃɹə(ʌ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Nature
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly behind it)the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/NAY-ch’r//ˈneiː.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Naughty
 – For this word, the “augh” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/NAW-dee//ˈnɔ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Navy
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/NAY-vee/ – /ˈneiː.viː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ne

Near
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/neer/ – /niːɹ/ –

Nearby (Near-by)
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/neer-bai/ – /niːɹ.baiː/ – Notice also that since this word is pronounced as two separate words, there is no discernible word-stress –

Nearly (Near-ly)
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/NEER-lee/ – /ˈniːɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Neat
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/nee[t]/ – /niː[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Necessarily
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/neh-sə-SAYR-ih-lee/ – /nɛ.sə.ˈseɪɹ.ə(ɪ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Necessary
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /NEH-sə-sayr-ee/ – /ˈnɛ.sə.seɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Necessitate
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/nih-SEH-sih-tay[t]//nə(ɪ).ˈsɛ.sə(ɪ).teiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Necessities
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounce almost like the letter “z”

/nih-SEH-sih-deez/ – /nə(ɪ).ˈsɛ.sə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Necessity
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/nih-SEH-sih-dee//nə(ɪ).ˈsɛ.sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Neck
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ck” ending is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/nehk/ – /nɛk/ –

Necklace
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent

/NEHK-lihs/ – /ˈnɛk.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Need
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/nee[d]/ – /niː[ɾ]/ –

Needle
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “d” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

/NEE-dəl/ – /ˈniː.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Negative
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/NEH-guh-tihv/ – /ˈnɛ.gə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

-OR-

Negative
– For this word,the “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

– /NEH-guh-dihv//ˈnɛ.gə(ʌ).ɾə(ɪ)v/ – notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Negatively
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/NEH-guh-tihv-lee//ˈnɛ.gə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Negligible
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the first “g” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “g” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

/NEH-glih-dʒih-bəl/ – /ˈnɛ.glə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Negotiate
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “o” is long, the first “t” is pronounced like the “sh” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “i” directly after it), the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/nə-GOH-shee-ay[t]/ – /nə.ˈgo.ʃiː.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Negotiation
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “o” is long, the first “t” is pronounced like the “sh” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “i” directly after it), the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-
voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/nə-goh-shee-AY-shihn/ – /nə.ˌgo.ʃiː.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Negotiations
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “o” is long, the first “t” is pronounced like the “sh” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “i” directly after it), the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-
voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/nih-goh-shee-AY-shin-z/ – /nə(ɪ).ˌgo.ʃiː.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the main stress is on the fourth syllable –

Negotiators
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “o” is long, the first “t” is pronounced like the “sh” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “i” directly after it), the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is (often) stopped, the “o” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/nə-GOH-shee-ay-d’rz/ – /nə.ˈgo.ʃiː.e.ɾɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Neighbor
– For this word, the “eigh” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “o” disappears

/NAY-b’r//ˈneiː.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Neighborhood
 – For this word, the “eigh” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the first “o” disappears, and for the “-hood” combination – the “oo” combination turns into a true-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/NAY-b’r-hə[d]//ˈneiː.bɚ.hə[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Neither
 – For this word, the “ei” combination is pronounce in two commonly accepted ways:  1.  it is pronounced like the single long letter “i”  2.  it is pronounce like the single long letter “e” (it is simply a matter of personal preference), the “th” combination is voiced, and the “e” disappears

/NAI-th’r//ˈnaiː.ðɚ/  – OR –  /NEE-th’r//ˈniː.ðɚ/ – Notice also that, in both pronunciations, the stress is on the first syllable

Nephew
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ew” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/NEH-fyou/ – /ˈnɛ.fju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Nephews
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination The Common Tongue), the “ew” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/NEH-fyouz/ – /ˈnɛ.fjuz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Nepotism
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and there is a true-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/NEH-puh-tih-zəm//ˈnɛ.pə(ʌ).tə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Nerve
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/n’r-v//nɚ.v/ – Notice also that the “v” ending acts as a second syllable

Nervous
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /N’R-vihs//ˈnɚ.və(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Nervousness
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /N’R-vihs-nihs//ˈnɚ.və(ɪ)s.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Nest
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/neh-s[t]//nɛ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “st” combination (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a second syllable

Nestle
 – For this name, the first “e” is short, the “t” is silent, and the final “e” is long

/NEHS-lee//ˈnɛs.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Net
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/neh[t]//nɛ[t]/

Netiquette
 – For this slang term, the first “e” is short, the first “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/NEH-dih-kih[t]//ˈnɛ.ɾə(ɪ).kɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Network
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “o” disappears, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/NEH[T]-w’r-[k]//ˈnɛ[t].wɚ.[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Networked
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “o” disappears, the “k” is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/NEH[T]-w’r-[k]-t//ˈnɛ[t].wɚ.[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “t” acts as a separate syllable –

Networking
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “o” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /NEH[T]-w’r-king//ˈnɛ[t].wɚ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Neuro-Psychological
 – For this word, for the “neuro-” prefix – the “eu” combination is turns into a true-schwa, and the “o” is long (this is the standard pronunciation of this prefix in The Common Tongue), for the “Psycho-” prefix – the “Ps” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “o” turns into a true-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this prefix in The Common Tongue), the third “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/nə-roh-sigh-kə-LAH-dʒih-kəl//ˌnə.ɹo.ˌsʌiː.kə.ˈlɑ.dʒə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that there are minor stresses on the first and third syllables and that the major stress is on the fifth syllable

Neutral
 – For this word, the “eu” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/NOO-chrəl/ – /ˈnu.tʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Never
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” disappears

/NEH-v’r//ˈnɛ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Nevertheless (never-the-less)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “th” combination is voiced, the third “e” turns into a u-schwa, the fourth “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/neh-v’r-thuh-LEHS//ˌnɛ.vɚ.ðə(ʌ).ˈlɛs/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the last syllable

New
 – For this word, the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/noo//nu/

New Hampshire
 – For the first name, the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” – then the “H” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the “i” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

– /noo-HæM[P]-sh’r//nu.ˈhæm[p].ʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable of the second word –

New York
 – For this name, the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” – then the “Y” takes the consonant sound, the “o” is long, and the final “k” is (sometimes) stopped

/noo-YOHR-[k]/ – /nu-ˈjor.[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Newly
 – For this word, the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue),

/NOO-lee//ˈnu.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

News
 – For this word, the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/noo-z//nu.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Newspaper
 – For this word, the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “e” disappears

/NOOZ-pay-p’r//ˈnuz.peiː.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Next
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /NEHK-s[t]//ˈnɛk.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a second syllable

Ni

Nibbling
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/NIH-bə-ling/ – /ˈnɪ.bə.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Nicaragua
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “c” is hard, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “r” is a flap-r (this means it is “rolled” but only once.  This is not a standard sound in English, but as this is the name of a country, it should be pronounced as closely as possible to the way the people of that country pronounce it.  This is one of the philosophies and practices of The Common Tongue.  The flap-r sound is made the same way as the flap-d and the flap-t), the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like a “w”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/nee-kuh-RAH-gwuh//ˌniː.kə(ʌ).ˈɾɑ.gwə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Nice
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/nighs//nʌiːs/

Niceties
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /NIGH-sih-teez//ˈnʌiː.sɪ.tiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Nicely
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/NIGHS-lee//ˈnʌiːs.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Niche
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

–  /neesh//niːʃ/

Niece
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /nees//niːs/

Nigeria
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “g” is soft, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” is pronounced like the short letter “u”

/nai-dʒEER-ee-yuh//naiː.ˈdʒiːɹiː.jʌ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Night
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is often Stopped

/nigh-[t]//nʌiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Nightclub
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words.  For the first word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is often stopped.  For the second word, the “c” is hard, the “u” is short, and the final “b” is (often) stopped.

/NIGHT-[T]//ˈnʌiː.[t].klʌ[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable, and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Nightmare
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the final “t” is often Stopped, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/NIGH[T]-mayr//nʌiː[t].meɪɹ/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Nikon
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “o” is short

/NIGH-kahn//ˈnʌiː.kɑn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Nine
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “e”

/nain//naiːn/

Nineteen
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-teen” suffix the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/nain-TEEN//naiːn.ˈtiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Nineties
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/NAIN-deez//ˈnaiːn.ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ninety
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/NAIN-dee//ˈnaiːn.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ninety-One
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, the “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “O” is pronounced like a letter “w” and short letter “u” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/nain-dee-WUHN//naiːn.ɾiː.ˈwʌn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Ninth
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/nain-th//naiːn.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Nit-Wit
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “t” is (usually) stopped, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/NIH[T]-wih[t]/ – /ˈnɪ[t].wə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

No

No
 – For this word, the “o” is long

/noh//no/

Nobody (no-Body)
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/NOH-buh-dee/ – /ˈno.bə(ʌ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Nod
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/nah[d]//ˈnɑ[ɾ]/

Nodding
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply as the single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/NAH-ding//ˈnɑ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Noise
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/noyz//noiːz/

Noises
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/NOY-zihz/ – /ˈnoiː.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Noisy
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/NOY-zee//ˈnoiː.ziː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

None
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/nuhn//nʌn/

Non-Sense
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the first “e” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/NAHN-sehn-s//ˈnɑn.sɛn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

Noodle
 – For this word, “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “d” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

– /NOO-dəl//ˈnu.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Noodles
 – For this word, “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “d” and the “l”, the “e” is silent, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /NOO-dəl-z//ˈnu.ɾəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Nor
 – For this word, the “o” is long

/nohr//noɹ/

Normal
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/NOHR-məl//ˈnoɹ.məl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Normally
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is
pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /NOHR-məl-ee//ˈnoɹ.məl.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

North
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/nohr-th//noɹ.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Northern
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-ern” suffix – the “e” disappears

/NOHR-th’rn//ˈnoɹ.ðɚn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Nose
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/nohz//noz/

Nostalgia
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the first “a” is short, the “g” is soft, and the “ia” combination turns into a u-schwa

/nuh-STæL-dʒuh/ – /nə(ʌ).ˈstæl.dʒə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Not
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /nah[t]//nɑ[t]/

Notably
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ably” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/NOH-duh-blee//ˈno.ɾə(ʌ).bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Note
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/noh[t]//no[t]/

Notes
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the “e” is silent

/noh-ts//no.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Nothing (no-Thing)
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/NUH-thing//ˈnʌ.θɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Notice
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /NOH-dihs//ˈno.ɾə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Noticeable (Notice-able)
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft and the first “e” is silent, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/NOH-dihs-uh-bəl//ˈno.ɾə(ɪ).sə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Noticed
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and since the root word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /NOH-dihs-[t]//ˈno.ɾə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Notified
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is long (it is not pronounced in conjunction with the letter “e” as a traditional “ie” combination), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “i” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is

/NOH-dih-fai[d]//ˈno.ɾə(ɪ).faiːɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Noun
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination

/nown//nɑun/

Novel
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the “e” disappears

/NAH-v’l//ˈnɑ.vl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Novels
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /NAH-v’lz/ – /ˈnɑ.vlz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

November
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the first “e” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/noh-VEHM-b’r//no.ˈvɛm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Novices
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/NAH-vih-sihz//ˈnɑ.və(ɪ).sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Now
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “cow” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/now//nɑu/

Nowadays
 – For this pseudo-word, the “o” is pronounced like in the “ow” combination (separate from the letter “w” which is pronounced as normal), the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/NOW-wuh-dayz//ˈnɑu.wə(ʌ).deiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Nowhere (no-Where)
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “h” is silent, the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

– /NOH-wayr//ˈno.weɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Nu

Nuances
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “c” is soft, and the “e” of the “-es” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/NOO-ahn-sihz//ˈnu.ɑn.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Nuclear
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “c” is hard, and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/NOO-kleer//ˈnu.kliːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Numb
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “b” is silent

/nuhm//nʌm/

Number
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the “e” disappears

/NUHM-b’r//ˈnʌm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Numbers
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/NUHM-b’rz//ˈnʌm.bɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Numerous
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/NOO-m’r-ihs//ˈnu.mɚ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Nurse
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/n’rs//nɚs/

Nursing
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/N’R-sing//ˈnɚ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Nurture
 – For this word, the first “u” disappears, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the second “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/N’R-ch’r//ˈnɚ.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Nut
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/nuh[t]//nʌ[t]/

Nutty
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/NUH-dee//ˈnʌ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Nutrition
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after directly after it), the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/noo-CHRIH-shihn//nu.ˈtʃɹɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Nuts
 – For this word, the “u” is short

/nuh-ts//nʌ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter N ) –


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