– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter O ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Oo

 

Ob . Oc . Od . Oe . Of . Og . Oh . Oi . Oj . Ok . Ol . Om . On . Oo . Op . Oq . Or . Os . Ot . Ou . Ov . Ow . Ox . Oy . Oz

 

Ob

Obesity
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “e” is long, the “e” is long, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/oh-BEE-sih-dee/ – /o.ˈbiː.sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable – 

Obey
 – For this word, the “O” is long, and the “ey” combination is pronounced like the long letter “a”

/oh-BAY/ – /o.ˈbeiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Object
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/AH[B]-dʒeh[k]-t/ – /ˈɑ[b].dʒɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Objective
– For this word, the “O” turns into a true-schwa, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə[b].dʒEH[K]-tihv/ – /ə[b].ˈdʒɛ[k].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Objectives
– For this word, the “O” turns into a true-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /əb-dʒEHK-dihv-z//əb.ˈdʒɛk.də(ɪ)v.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Objectivity
– For this word, the “O” is short, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix– the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ah[b]-dʒeh[k]-TIH-vih-dee/ – /ˌɑ[b].dʒɛ[k].ˈtɪ.və(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that  the major stress is on the third syllable –

Obligatory (Oblige-atory)
– For this word, the “O” is long, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /oh-BLIHG-ə-toh-ree//o.ˈblɪ.gə.to.ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

Oblige
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “i” is long, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /oh-BLAIdʒ//ə(ʌ).blaiːdʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when it is not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Obliged
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “i” is long, the “g” is soft, and since the root word ends with the sound of the soft letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

– /oh-BLAI-dʒ-[d]//ə(ʌ).blaiː.dʒ.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the soft “g” and the “d” ending (when it is not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Obscene
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a u-schwa, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “sc” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”, the first “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/uh[b]-SEEN/ – /ə(ʌ)[b].siːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Observation
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “b” is (often) stopped, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” disappears, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ah[b]-z’r-VAY-shihn/ – /ɑ[b].zɚ.ˈveiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Observe
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a u-schwa, the “b” is (often) stopped, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the first “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/uh[b]-Z’RV/ – /ə(ʌ)[b].ˈzɚv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Obsessed
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a u-schwa, the “b” is (often) stopped the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /uh[b]-SEH-st/ – /ə(ʌ)[b].ˈsɛ.st/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable

Obstacle
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “b” is (often) stopped, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

– /AH[B]-stih-kəl//ˈɑ[b].stə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Obstacles
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “b” is (often) stopped, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l”, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/AH[B]-stih-kəl-z//ˈɑ[b].stə(ɪ).kəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Obtain
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a u-schwa, the “b” is (often) stopped, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/uh[b]-TAYN/ – /ə(ʌ)[b].ˈteiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Obvious
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “ous” suffix– the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AH[B]-vee-ihs/ – /ˈɑ[b].viː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Obviously
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, for the “ous” suffix– the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AH[B]-vee-ihs-lee/ – /ˈɑ[b].viː.ə(ɪ)s.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Oc

Occasion
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /oh-KAY-zhihn/ – /o-ˈkeiː.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Occasionally
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-sion” – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “o” turns into an i-schwa,  and for the “-ally” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /oh-KAY-zhin-əl-ee/ – /o-ˈkeiː.ʒə(ɪ)n.əl.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Occupancy
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ancy” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AH-kyoo-pihn-see//ˈɑ.kju.pə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Occupied
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply as the single hard letter “c”, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is long (not pronounced as an “ie” combination), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “i” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/AH-kyoo-pai[d]/ – /ˈɑ.kju.paiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Occupy
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply as the single hard letter “c”, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/AH-kyoo-pai/ – /ˈɑ.kju.paiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Occur
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, and the “u” disappears

/uh-K’R/ – /ə(ʌ).ˈkɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Occurred
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a u-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “u” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uh-K’R-‘[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈkəɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Ocean
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “ce” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /OH-shihn//ˈo.ʃɪn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

October
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the second “o” is long, and the “e” disappears

/ah[k]-TOH-b’r/ – /ɑ[k].ˈto.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Octopus
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the “u” turns into a true-schwa

/AHK-tuh-pəs//ˈɑk.tə(ʌ).pəs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Od

Odd
 – For this word, the “O” is short, and the “dd” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-d but is (usually) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ah[d]/ – /ɑ[ɾ]/ –

Oddly
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-d but is (usually) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is
the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AH[D]-lee/ – /ˈɑ[ɾ].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Oe

Oe

Of

Of
 – For this word, the “O” is pronounce like the short letter “u”, and the “f” is pronounced like the letter “v”

/uhv/ – /ʌv/ –

Off
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/awf//ɔf/

Offence
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f”, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” is short, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uh-FEHN-s//ə(ʌ).ˈfɛn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

Offend
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uh-FEHN-[d]//ə(ʌ).ˈfɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that –

Offense – [sports]
 – For this word, the “O” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short,  and the final “e” is silent

– /AW-fehn-s//ˈɔ.fɛn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Offensive
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-FEHN-sihv//ə.ˈfɛn.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Offer
 –  For this word, the “O” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

– /AW-f’r//ˈɔ.fɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Office
 – For this word, the “O” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ice” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final
“e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AW-fihs//ˈɔ.fə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that –

Officer
 – For this word, the “O” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-ice” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” is combines with the “-er” suffix, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue),

/AW-fih-s’r//ˈɔ.fə(ɪ).sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Official
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, and for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-FIH-sh’l//ə.ˈfɪ.ʃ[ə]l/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Officially
 –For this word, the “O” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-FIH-shə-lee//ə.ˈfɪ.ʃə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Often
 – For this word, the “O” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “t” can be either silent or pronounced depending on preference, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

– /AWF-[t]ihn/ – /ˈɔf.[t]ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Og

Oh

Oh
 – For this word, the “O” is long, and the final “h” is silent

/oh//o/

Ohio
 – For this word the “O” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the “i” is long and the final “o” is long

– /oh-HAI-oh//o.haiː.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Oi

Oj

Oil
 – For this word, the “Oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and there is a phantom consonant letter “y” and a phantom-schwa in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next

/OY-yəl//ˈoiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ok

OK
 – For this (false) acronym, the “O” and the “K” are pronounced simply as the names of each letter

/oh-kay//o.ke/ – Notice also that there is no discernible word-stress –

Okay
 – For this word, the “O” is long, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/oh-kay//o.ke/ – Notice also that there is no discernible word-stress –

Ol

Old
 – For this word, the “O” is long, and the final “d” is a flap-d, but is (often) stopped

/ohl[d]/ – /ol[ɾ]/ –

Oleaginous
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “e” is long, the “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /oh-lee-æ-dʒih-nihs//o.liː.ˈæ.dʒə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Om

O’malley
 – For this name, the “O” is long, the “a” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is silent, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/o--lee/ – /o.ˈmæ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

On

On
 – For this word, the “O” is short

/ahn//ɑn/ – Notice also that –

Once
 – For this word, there is a phantom-W before the “O”, the “O” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /wuhn-s//wʌn.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable –

One
 – For this word, there is a phantom-W in front of the “O”, the “O” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

– /wuhn//wʌn/

Oncology
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ology” suffix – the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ahn-KAH-lə-dʒee//ɑn.ˈkɑ.lə.dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Onion
 – For this word, the “O” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/UHN-yihn//ˈʌn.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

On-Line
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/ahn-LAIN//ɑn.ˈlaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Only
 – For this word, the “O” is long, and for the “ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/OHN-lee/ – /ˈon.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Onto
 – For this word, the “O” is short, and the final “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/AHN-too//ˈɑn.tu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Oo

Op

Open
 – For this word, the “O” is long, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/OH-pihn//ˈo.pə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Opened
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /OH-pihn-[d]//ˈo.pə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Openly
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/OH-pihn-lee//ˈo.pə(ɪ)n.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Opera
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “e” disappears, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /AH-pruh//ˈɑp.ɹə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Operate
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually)
stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AH-p’r-ay[t]//ˈɑ.pɚ.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Operating
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “e” disappears, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” is dropped because of the addition of the “-ing” suffix – and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AH-p’r-ay-ding//ˈɑ.pɚ.eiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Operation
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “e” disappears, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “e” is dropped due to the addition of the “-tion” suffix – and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the last “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ah-p’r-AY-sh’n//ɑ.pɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Operations
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “e” disappears, for the “-ate” suffix– the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the last “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /ah-p’r-AY-sh’n-z//ɑ.pɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Operator
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “e” disappears, for the “-ate” suffix– the “a” is a True Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” (usually) turns into a flap-d, and the second “o” disappears

/AH-p’r-ay-d’r/ – /ˈɑ.pɚ.eiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Opinion
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the second “o” turns into a i-schwa

/ə-PIHN-yihn//ə.ˈpɪn.jɪn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Opponent
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a true-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is long, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-POH-nihn-[t]//ə.ˈpo.nə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Opportunities
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” disappears, the “u” is long, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final letter “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ah-p’r-TOO-nih-dees/ – /ˌɑ.pɚ.ˈtu.nə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Opportunity
 – For this word, the first “O” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” disappears, the “u” is long, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/ah-p’r-TOO-nih-dee//ˌɑ.pɚ.ˈtu.nə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Oppose
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a true-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z” and the final “e” is silent

/ə-POHZ//ə.ˈpoz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Opposed
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a true-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and because the root word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /ə-POHZ-[d]/ – /ə.ˈpoz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Opposing
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a true-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ə-POH-zing//ə.ˈpo.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Opposite
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /AH-poh-zih[t]//ˈɑ.pə(ʌ).zɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Opposition
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ah-puh-ZIH-shihn//ˈɑ.pə(ʌ).ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Optimism
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa , the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like
the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AH[P]-tə-mih.zəm/ – /ˈɑ[p].tə.mə(ɪ).səm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Optimist
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa , the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/AH[P]-tə-mihs-[t]/ – /ˈɑ[p].tə.mə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Optimistic
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/ah[p]-tih-MIHS-dih[k]/ – /ˌɑ[p].tə(ɪ).ˈmɪs.də(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress is on the first syllable and that  the major stress is on the third syllable –

Optimists
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa , the second “i” is an i-schwa

/AH[P]-tə-mihs-ts/ – /ˈɑ[p].tə.mə(ɪ)s.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” acts as a fourth syllable –

Optimize
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AH[P]-tih-maiz//ˈɑ[p].tə(ɪ).maiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Option
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “p” is (sometimes) stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AH[P]-shihn//ˈɑ[p].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Options
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “p” is (sometimes) stopped, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /AH[P]-shihn-z//ˈɑ[p].ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Oq

Or

Or
 – For this word, the “O” is long

/ohr//oɹ/

Orange
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/OHR-ihn-dʒ//ˈoɹ.ə(ɪ)n.dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Order
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this
suffix in The Common Tongue)

/OHR-d’r//ˈoɹ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ordinary
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/OHR-dih-nayr-ee//ˈoɹ.ɾə(ɪ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Organ
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “g” is hard, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/OHR-gihn//ˈoɹ.gə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Organization
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the first “i” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Dipthong, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ohr-gən-ai-ZAY-sh’n//ˌoɹ.gə(ɪ)n.aiː.zeiː.ʃən/ – Notice also that  there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Organize
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /OHR-gihn-aiz//ˈoɹ.gə(ɪ)n.aiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Organized
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is long, and since the word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /OHR-gihn-aiz-[d]//ˈoɹ.gə(ɪ)n.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Organizer
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /OHR-g’n-ai-z’r//ˈoɹ.gə(ɪ)n.aiː.zɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Organizing
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /OHR-gih-ai-zing/ – /ˈoɹ.gə(ɪ)n.aiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Orienteering
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ee” is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ohr-ee-ihn-TEER-ing//ˌoɹ.iː.ə(ɪ)n.ˈtiːɹ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that  the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Origin
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the second “i” is an i-schwa

/OHR-ih-dʒihn//ˈoɹ.ə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Original
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-RIH-dʒih-nəl//ˈə.ɹɪ.dʒə(ɪ)əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Originally
 – For this word, the “O” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ə-RIH-dʒih-nə-lee//ə.ɹɪ.dʒə(ɪ)nə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Orphanage
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “a” turns into an i-schwa, ə ( ɪ )d ʒ – , and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and
the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/OHR-fihn-idʒ//ˈoɹ.fə(ɪ)n.ɪdʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Os

Ot

Other
 – For this word, the “O” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” combination is voiced, and the “e” disappears

/UH-th’r//ˈʌ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Otherwise (Other-Wise)
– For this word, the “O” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” combination is voiced, the “e” disappears, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/UH-th’r-waiz//ˈʌ.ðɚ.waiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ottawa
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the single a flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /AH-də-wuh//ˈɑ.ɾə.wə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ou

Ouch
 – for this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination

/ow-ch//au.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable –

Ought
 – For this word, the “ough” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/aw[t]//ɔ[t]/

Ounce
 – For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “c” is soft, the “e” is silent

/own-s//ˈaun.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

Ounces
 – For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/OWN-siz//ˈaun.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Our
 – For this word, the “O” is short, and the “u” is pronounced like the letter “w”

/AH-w’r//ˈɑ.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ours
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the letter “w”, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/AH-w’rz//ˈɑ.wɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ourselves (our-Self-s)
– For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “e” is short, the second “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/ahr-SEHLV-z//ɑɹ.ˈsɛlv.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Out
 – For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ow[t]//ɑu[t]/ –

Outbreak (out-Break)
– For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like a single True Long “A”, and the final “k” is (sometimes) stopped

/OW[T]-brayk//ˈau[t].bɹek/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Outdoor (out-Door)
– For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/ow[t]-DOHR//au[t].ˈdoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Outdoors (out-Doors)
– For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/ow[t]-DOHR-z//au[t].ˈdoɹ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Outer
 – For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” disappears

/ow-d’r//ˈau.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Outfit
 – For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the first “t” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/OW[T]-fih[t]//ˈɑu[t].fə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Outgoing (out-Going)
– For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “g” is hard, the “o” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ow[t]-GOH-ing//au[t].ˈgo.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Outline (out-Line)
– For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/OW[T]-lain//ˈau[t].laiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Outlined (out-Lined)
– For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” is silent and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/OW[T]-lain-[d]/ – /ˈau[t].leiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Output (out-Put)
– For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/OW[T]-pə[t]//ˈau[t].pə[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Outrage (out-Rage)
– For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphtong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/OW[T]-raydʒ.d//ˈau[t].ɹaiːdʒ.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Outraged (out-Raged)
– For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphtong, the “g” is soft, and since the root word ends with the sound of the soft letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/OW[T]-raydʒ.d//ˈau[t].ɹaiːdʒ.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Outrageous
– For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “a” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, “g”  is soft, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ow[t]-RAY-dʒihs//ou[t].ˈɹeiː.dʒə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Outside (out-Side)
– For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “i” is long, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ow[t]-SAI[D]/ – /ɑu[t].ˈsaiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Outstanding (out-Standing)
– For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the first “t” is (often) stopped, the “a” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ow[t]-STæN-ding//ɑu[t].ˈstæn.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Outstandingly (out-Standing-ly)
– For this word, the “Ou” combination is pronounced like an “ow” combination, the first “t” is (usually) stopped, the “a” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /ow[t]-STæN-ding-lee//au[t].ˈs[t]æn.dɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ov

Oven
 – For this word, the “O” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/UH-vihn//ˈʌ.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Over
 – For this word, the “O” is long, and the “e” disappears

/OH-v’r//ˈo.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Overall (over-All)
– For this word, the “O” is long, the “e” disappears, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/oh-v’r-AHL//o.vɚ.ɔl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Overbearing
– For this word, the “O” is long, the “e” disappears, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/oh-v’r-BAYR-ing//o.vɚ.ˈbeɪɹ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Overcast
– For this word, the “O” is long, the “e” disappears, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/OH-v’r-kæs-[t]//ˈo.vɚ.kæs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Overcome (over-Come)
– For this word, the “O” is long, the “e” disappears, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/oh-v’r-KUHM//o.vɚ.ˈkʌm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Overdrawn (over-Drawn)
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” disappears, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/oh-v’r-dʒRAHN//ˌo.vɚ.ˈdʒɹɔn/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Overdue (over-Due)
– For this word, the “O” is long, and the first “e” disappears, and the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/oh-v’r-DOO//o.vɚ.ˈdu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Oversight (over-Sight)
– For this word, the “O” is long, the “e” disappears, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “night” (this is the standard pronunciation of the letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /OH-v’r-sigh[t]/ – /ˈo.vɚ.sʌɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Overview (over-View)
– For this word, the “O” is long, and the “e” disappears, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/OH-v’r-vyoo//ˈo.vɚ.vju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Overwhelmed
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the first “e” disappears, the “h” is silent, the second “e” is short, and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

– /oh-v’r-WEHLM-[d]//o.vɚ.ˈwɛlm.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Overwhelming
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the first “e” disappears, the “h” is silent, the second “e” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /oh-v’r-WEHL-ming//o.vɚ.ˈwɛl.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Overwhelmingly
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the first “e” disappears, the “h” is silent, the second “e” is short, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /oh-v’r-WEHL-ming-lee//o.vɚ.ˈwɛl.mɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Overwrought
 – For this word, the “O” is long, the “e” disappears, the “w” is silent, the “ough” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/oh-v’r-RAW[T]//o.vɚ.ˈɹɔ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Ow

Owe
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”), and the final “e” is silent

/oh//o/

Owed
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”), – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/oh-[d]/ – /o.[ɾ]/ –

Own
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

– /ohn//on/ –

Owned
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”), and since the root word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

– /ohn-[d]//on.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Owner
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)the “e” disappears

– /OH-n’r//o.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ownership
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”), the “e” disappears, and for the “-ship” suffix – the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /OH-n’r-shih[p]//o.nɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ox

Oxygen
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “y” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/AHK-sih-dʒihn//ˈɑk.sə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Oxygenate
 – For this word, the “O” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “y” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/AHK-sih-dʒih-nay[t]//ˈɑk.sə(ɪ).dʒə(ɪ).ne[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Oxymoron (oxy-Moron)
– For this word, the “O” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “o” is long, the third “o” is short

– /ahk-see-MOHR-ahn//ɑk.siː.ˈmoɹ.ɑn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter O ) –

 


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