– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter P:  Pa ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue — a.k.a. — American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in The English Language, with more words added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of The English Language — both world-wide, and through-out America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Pa

 

Pe . Ph . Pi . Pl . Po . Pra . Pre . Pri . Pro . Pru-Pry . Ps . Pu . Py

 

 

Pace
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/pays//peiːs/

 

Pack
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pæk//pæk/

 

Package
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” is pronounced like the letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PæK-ih-dʒ//ˈpæk.ə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Packaging
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PæK-ih.dʒing//ˈpæk.ə(ɪ).dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Packet
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/-kih[t]//ˈpæ.kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Page
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/pay-dʒ//peiː.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Pageant
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the “ea” combination turns into an i-schwa, and the “t” is (usually) stoppped

/-dʒən[t]//ˈpæ.dʒə(i)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pageantry
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the “ea” combination turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/-dʒən-chree//ˈpæ.dʒə(i)n.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pago Pago
– For this name, both of the letters “a” are pronounced like the short letter “o”, both letters “g” are hard, and both letters “o” are long

/PAH-go PAH-go//ˈpɑ.goˈpɑ.go/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first and third syllable –  Take The TOEFL iBT Exam in Pago Pago

 

Pain
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/payn//peiːn/

 

Painful (Pain-full)
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAYN-fəl//ˈpeiːn.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Paint
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/payn[t]//peiːn[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Paints
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/payn-ts//peiːn.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Painter
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAYN-t’r//ˈpeiːn.tɚ/the stress is on the first syllable

 

Painting
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), , and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAYN-ting//ˈpeiːn.tɪŋ/the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pair
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/payr//peɪɹ/

 

Palace
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/-lihs//ˈpæ.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Palaces
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/-lih-sihz//ˈpæ.lə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Palazzo
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “zz” combination is pronounced like a “ts” combination, and the final “o” is long

/pə-LAH-tsoh//pə.ˈlɑ.tso/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Pale
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/payl//peɪl/

 

Pan
– For this word, the “a” is short

/pæn//pæn/

 

Panel
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/-nəl//ˈPæ.nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pants
– For this word, the “a” is short

/pæn-ts//pæn.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Paper
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/PAY-p’r//ˈpeiː.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Parachute
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is a u-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “u” is long, the “t” is stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/PAYR-uh-shoo[t]//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).ʃu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Parachuting
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is a u-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “u” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAYR-uh-shoo-ding//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).ʃu.ɾɪŋ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Paradigm
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, and the “g” is silent

/PAYR-uh-daim//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).daiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Paradox
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, and the final “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/PAYR-uh-dah-ks//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).dɑ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Paragraph (para-Graph)
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the third “a” is short, and the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PAYR-uh-græf//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).gɹæf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Paraguay
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the letter “w”, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PAYR-uh-gwai//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).gwaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Parallel
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” is short

/PAYR-uh-lehl//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).lɛl/ – Notice that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Parameter (para-Meter)
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, and for the “-meter” suffix – the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the last “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pə--mih-d’r//pə.ˈɹæ.mə(ɪ).ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Parameters (para-Meters)
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, for the “-meter” suffix – the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the last “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/pə--mih-d’r-z//pə.ˈɹæ.mə(ɪ).ɾɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Parameterization (para-Meter-ize-ation)
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, for the “-meter” suffix – the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the last “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the third “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pə--mih-d’r-ai-ZAY-shuhn//pə.ˌɹæ.mə(ɪ).ɾɚ.aiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and the major stress is on the sixth syllable

 

Paramount
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (ofte) stopped

/PAYR-uh-mown-[t]//ˈpeiːɹ.ə(ʌ).moun-[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Paraplegic
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is a u-schwa, the “e” is long, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/payr-uh-PLEE-dʒih[k]//ˌpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).ˈpliː.dʒə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Parent
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PAYR-ihn[t]//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Parental
– For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/puh-REHN-təl//pə(ʌ).ɹˈɛn.təl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Parents
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/PAYR-ihn-ts//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Park
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/pahr-[k]//pɑɹ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts like a second syllable and that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Parked
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/pahr-[k]-t//pɑɹ-[k].t/ – Notice that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Parliament
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “ia” combination turns into an true-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PAHR-lə-mihn-[t]//ˈpɑɹ.lə.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Part
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pahr-[t]//pɑɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Partake
– For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/pahr-TAY[K]//pɑɹ.ˈteiː[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Partaking
– For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pahr-TAY-king//pɑɹ.ˈteiː.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Partial
– For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/PAHR-shəl//ˈpɑɹ.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Participant
– For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is often (stopped)

/pahr-TIH-sih-pihn-[t]//pɑɹ.ˈtɪ.sə(ɪ).pə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable 

 

Participants
– For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pahr-TIH-sih-pihn-ts//pɑɹ.ˈtɪ.sə(ɪ).pə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fifth syllable 

 

Participated
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/pahr-TIH-sih-pay-dih[d]//pɑɹ.ˈtɪ.sə(ɪ).peiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Participative
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pahr-TIH-sih-puh-tihv//pɑɹ.ˈtɪ.sə(ɪ).pə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Participle
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” a flap-t, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa between the “p” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

/PAHR-dih-sih-pəl//ˈpɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ).sə(ɪ),pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Particular
– For this word, the “a” disappears, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the last “a” disappears

/p’r-TIHK-yoo-l’r//pɚ.ˈtɪk.ju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Particularly
– For this word, the “a” disappears, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” disappears, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-TIHK-yoo-l’r-lee//pɚ.tɪk.ju.lɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Partition
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pahr-TIH-shihn//pɑɹ.ˈtɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Partly
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAHR-[t]-lee//ˈpɑɹ.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Partner
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-er” suffix the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAHR[T]-n’r//ˈpɑɹ[t].nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Partnership
– For this word, For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, for the “-er” suffix the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ship” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAHR[T]-n’r-shih[p]//ˈpɑɹ[t].nɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Parts
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/pahr-ts//pɑɹ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Party
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PAHR-dee//ˈpɑɹ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pass
– For this word, the “a” is short

/pæs//pæs/

 

Passage
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-sih-dʒ//ˈpæ.sə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Passe
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/pæ-SAY//pæ.ˈseiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Passed
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” is silent, and the “d” ending sounds like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/pæs-t//pæs.t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Passenger
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” ending is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-sihn-dʒɚ//ˈpæ.sə(ɪ)n.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Passing
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-sing//ˈpæ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Passion
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a true-schwa

/-shən//ˈpæ.ʃən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Passionate
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “io” combination turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-shih-nih[t]//ˈpæ.ʃə(ɪ)nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Passport (Pass-Port)
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PæS-pohr[t]//ˈpæs.poɹ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Past
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/pæs[t]//pæs[t]/

 

Pasta
– For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/PAHS-tuh//ˈpɑs.tə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Paste
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/PAYS-[t]//ˈpeiːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Pastries
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PAYS-chreez//ˈpeiːs.tʃɹiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pasture
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “e” is silent

/PæS-ch’r//pæs.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pastures
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PæS-ch’r-z//pæs.tʃɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Patch
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/-ch//ˈpæ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ch” combination acts as a separate syllable

 

Patches
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/-chihz//ˈpæ.tʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Patent
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent, and the final “t” is also (usually) stopped

/-[t]n[t]//ˈpæ.[t]ən[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Patented
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/-[t]n-tih[d]//ˈpæ.[t]ən.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Path
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/pæth//pæð/

 

Pathological
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “th” combination is un-voiced, the first “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pæ-thuh-LAH-dʒih-kəl//pæ.θə(ʌ).ˈlɑ.dʒə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Patience
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-scwha, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/PAY-shihn-s//ˈpeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Patient
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “t” is (often) stopped

/PAY-shihn[t]//ˈpeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Patients
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/PAY-shihn-ts//ˈpeɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Patio
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “o” is long

/-dee-oh//ˈpæ.ɾiː.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Patriarchal
– For this word, the first “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pay-chree-AHR-kəl//peiː.tʃɹiː.ˈɑɹ.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Patricia
– For this name, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/puh-CHRIH-shuh//pə(ʌ).ˈtʃɹɪ.ʃə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Patriot
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PAY-chree-ih[t]//ˈpeiː.tʃɹiː.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Patriotic
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard

/pay-chree-AH-dihk//peiː.tʃɹiː.ˈɑ.ɾə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Patriotism (Patriot-ism)
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAY-chree-uh-tih-zəm//ˈpeiː.tʃɹiː.ə(ʌ).tɪ.zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Patron
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/PAY-chrihn//ˈpeiː.tʃɹə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pattern
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/-d’rn//ˈpæ.ɾɚn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Patronizing
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAY-chruh-nai-zing//ˈpe.tʃɹə(ʌ).naiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pause
– For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/pawz//pɔz/

 

Pavilion
– For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the second “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/puh-VIHL-ee-yihn//pə(ʌ).ˈvɪl.iː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Pavilions
– For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the second “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/puh-VIHL-ee-yihn-z//pə(ʌ).ˈvɪl.iː.jə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Pay
– For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pay//peiː/

 

Payment (Pay-ment)
– For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PAY-mihn-[t]//ˈpeiː.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English PronunciationLetter P ) –


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