– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter P:  Po ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Po

 

Pa . Pe . Ph . Pi . Pl . Pra . Pre . Pri . Pro . Pru-Pry . Ps . Pu . Py

 

Podcast
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but (often) stopped, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PAH[D]-kæs[t]//ˈpɑ[ɾ].kæs[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pocket
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PAH-kih[t]//ˈpɑ.kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Podium
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “u” is a u-schwa

/POH-dee-uhm//ˈpo.diː.ə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Poem
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” turns into a true-schwa but almost disappears

/POH-əm//ˈpo.əm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Poetry
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/POH-ih-chree//ˈpo.ə(ɪ).tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Poinsettia
– For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/poyn-SEH-dee-yuh//poiːn.ˈsɛ.ɾiː.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Point
– For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/poyn.[t]//poiːn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Pointed
– For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-words ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/POYN-tih[d]//ˈpoiːn.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Poise
– For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/poyz//poiːz./

 

Poised
– For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/poyz-[d]//poiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Poison
– For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

/POY-zihn//ˈpoiː.zə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Poisonous
– For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/POY-zih-nihs//ˈpoiːzə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Poke
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/po[k]//po[k]/

 

Poked
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/po[k]-t//po[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Pole
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/pohl//pol/

 

Police
– For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/puh-LEES//pə(ʌ).ˈliːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Policies
– For this word, the “o” is short, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PAH-lih-seez//ˈpɑ.lə(ɪ).siːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Policy
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PAH-lih-see//ˈpɑ.lə(ɪ).siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Polish (adjective)
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/POHL-ihsh//ˈpol-ə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Polish (verb)
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/PAH-lihsh//ˈpɑ.lə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Polished
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “sh” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (sometimes) stopped

/PAH-lihsh-[t]//ˈpɑ.lə(ɪ)ʃ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Polite
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ite” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/pə-LIGH[T]//pə.ˈlʌiː[t] / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Politely
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ite” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pə-LIGH[T]-lee//pə.ˈlʌiː[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Political
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pə-LIH-dih-kəl//pə.ˈlɪ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Politically
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pə-LIH-dihk-lee//pə.ˈlɪ.ɾə(ɪ)k.li ː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Politician
– For this word, the “o” is short, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, for the “-cian” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pah-lih-TIH-shən//pɑ.lə(ɪ).ˈtɪ.ʃən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Politicians
– For this word, the “o” is short, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, for the “-cian” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/pah-lih-TIH-shən-z//pɑ.lə(ɪ).ˈtɪ.ʃən.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Politics
– For this word, the “o” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAH-lih-tih-ks//ˈpɑ.lə(ɪ).tɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Polka
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “l” is almost silent, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/POHL-kuh//ˈpol.kə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Polluted
– For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/puh-LOO-dih-[d]//pə(ʌ).ˈlu.ɾə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Pollution
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pə-LOO-shihn//pə.ˈlu.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Pool
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pool//pul/

 

Poor
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pohr//poɹ/

 

Pop
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/pah[p]//pɑ[p]/

 

Popping
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAH-ping//ˈpɑ.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Popular
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “a” disappears

/PAHP-you-l’r//ˈpɑp.ju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Populated
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a TRUE Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is s flap-d but is (often) stopped

/PAH-pyou-lay-dih[d]//ˈpɑp.ju.le.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Population
– For this word, the “o” is shoret, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pah-pyou-LAY-shihn//pɑ.pju.ˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Populous
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAH-pyou-lihs//ˈpɑ.pju.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Porch
– For this word, the “o” is long

/pohr-ch//poɹ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Pornography (porno-Graph-y)
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the second “o” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a”turns into a true-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the final “y”

/pohr-NAH-grə-fee//poɹ.ˈnɑ.gɹə.fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Port
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pohr-[t]//poɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Portable
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/POHR-də-bəl//ˈpoɹ.də(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Portfolio
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the second “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “o” is long

/pohr[t]-FOH-lee-oh//poɹ[t].ˈfo.liː.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Portugal
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “r” is a flap-r (like a rolled “r” but rolled only once), the “u” is long, the “g” is hard, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o” (This word contains sounds which are not native to English, but in The Common Tongue, we pronounced Names of cities and countries and other “native” words as close as possible to the native pronunciation)

/pohr-too-GAHL//poɹ.tu.ˈgɑl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Portuguese
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “r” is a flap-r (like a rolled “r” but rolled only once), the “u” is long, the “g” is hard, the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/pohr-too-GEEZ//poɹ.tu.ˈgiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Pose
– For this word, the “o” is long, the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/pohz//poz/

 

Poser
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/POH-z’r//ˈpo.zɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Poses
– For this word, the “o” is long, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/pohz//poz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Posh
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/pahsh//pɑʃ/

 

Position
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is short, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the last “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pə-ZIH-shihn//pə.ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Positioned
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is short, for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/pə-ZIH-shihn-d//pə.ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

 

Positions
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is short, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the last “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/pə-ZIH-shuhnz//pə-ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)nz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Positive
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the first letter “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAH-zih-dihv//ˈpɑ.zə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Positively
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the first letter “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAH-zih-tihv//ˈpɑ.zə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Possess
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “ss” combination is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pə-ZEHS//pə.ˈzɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Possession
– For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “ss” combination is pronounced like the single letter “z”, the “e” is short, the second “ss” combinations with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-sion” combination – and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pə-ZEH-shihn//pə.ˈzɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Possibility
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pah-sih-BIH-lih-dee//ˌpɑ.sə(ɪ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the main stress is on the third syllable

 

Possible
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/PAH-sih-bəl//ˈpɑ.sə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Possibly
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAH-sih-blee//ˈpɑ.sə(ɪ).bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Post
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pohs-[t]//ˈpos.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Postponing
 – For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is (often) stopped, the second “o” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pohs-[t]-POH-ning//ˈpos.[t].ˈpo.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Posted
– For this word, the “o” is long, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/POH-stih[d]//ˈpo.stə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Poster
– For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/POHS-t’r//ˈpos.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Post-Graduate
– For this hyphenated compound word, the “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, then the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pohs[t]-GRæ-dʒoo-ih[t]//pos[t].ˈgɹæ.dʒu.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Postmark (post-Mark)
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/POHS[T]-mahr[k]//ˈpos[t].mɑɹ[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Postpone
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the second “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/pohs[t]-POHN//pos[t].ˈpon/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Postponed
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the second “o” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n”– the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/pohs[t]-POHN-d//pos[t].ˈpon.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Posture
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/PAHS-ch’r//ˈpɑs.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pot
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pah[t]//pɑt/

 

Potato
– For this word, the first “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the final “o” is long

/puh-TAY-doh//pə(ʌ).ˈte.ɾo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Potatoes
– For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “oe” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/puh-TAY-dohz//pə(ʌ).ˈte.ɾoz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Potential
– For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/puh-TEHN-shəl//pə(ʌ).ˈtɛn.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Pound
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “d” is (usually) stopped

/pown-[d]//pɑun.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Pour
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/pohr//poɹ/

 

Pouring
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pohr-ing//ˈpoɹ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Poverty
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PAH-v’r-dee//ˈpɑ.vɚ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Powder
– For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/POW-d’r//ˈpɑu.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Power
– For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/POW-‘r//ˈpɑu.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Powerful
– For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAH-w’r-fəl//ˈpɑ.wɚ.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter P ) –


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