– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter P:  Pre ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Pre

 

Pa . Pe . Ph . Pi . Pl . Po . Pra . Pri . Pro . Pru-Pry . Ps . Pu . Py

Precious
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PREH-shihs//ˈpɹɛ.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Precipitous
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is
the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-SIH-pə-tihs//pɹə.ˈsɪ.pə.tə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Precise
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/prih-SIGHS//pɹə(ɪ).ˈsʌiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Precisely
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pree-SIGHS-lee//pɹiː.ˈsʌiːs.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Precipice
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “c” is soft, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/PREH-sih-pihs//ˈpɹɛ.sə(ɪ).pə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Predict (pre-Dict)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/prih-DIH[K]-t//pɹə(ɪ).ˈdɪ[k].t/Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Predictability (pre-Dict-ability)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ability” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prih-dih[k]-tuh-BIH-lih-dee//pɹə(ɪ).ˌdɪ[k].tə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that there is a minor stress on the fourth syllable

 

Predicts (pre-Dict-s)
– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/prih-DIHK-ts//pɹə(ɪ).ˈdɪ[k].ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Predominantly (pre-Dominant-ly)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prih-DAH-mih-nihn[t]-lee//pɹə(ɪ).ˈdɑ.mə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)n[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Preemptively
– For this word, the first “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between both letters “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the second “e” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pree-YEHM[P]-tihv-lee//pɹiːˈjɛm[p].tə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Prefabricated (pre-Fabricated)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the first “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/pree--brih-kay-dih[d]//priː.ˈfæ.bɹɪ.keiː.ɾɪ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Prefer
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prih-F’R//pɹə(ɪ).ˈfɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Preferable (Prefer-able)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PREH-fruh-bəl//ˈpɹɛ.fɹə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Preference
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft,
and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PREH-frihn-s//ˈpɹɛ.fɹə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Preferred
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/pree-F’R[D]//pɹiːˈfɚ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Pregnancies
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PREH[G]-nihn-seez//ˈpɹɛ[g].nə(ɪ)n.siːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Pregnancy
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PREH[G]-nihn-see//ˈpɹɛ[g].nə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Pregnant
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PREHG-nihn-[t]//ˈpɹɛg.nə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Prejudice (pre-Judge-ice)
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent

/PREH-dʒə-dihs//ˈpɹɛ.dʒə.dɪs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Preliminary
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-LIH-mih-nayr-ee//pɹə.ˈlɪ.mə(ɪ).neɪɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Premature (pre-Mature)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “a”turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/pree-muh-CH’R//pɹiː.mə(ʌ).tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Premises
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa

/PREH-mih-sihs//ˈpɹɛ.mə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Preparation
– for this word, the “e” is short, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/preh-pə-RAY-shihn//ˌpɹɛ.pə.ˈɹeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Prepare
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/pree-PAYR//pɹiː.ˈpeɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Prepared
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/pree-PAYR-[d]//pɹiː.ˈpeɪɹ.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Preparedness
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” combines with the “-ed” suffix and turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pree-PAYR-ih[d]-nihs//pɹiː.ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)[d].nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Presence
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounces like the letter “z”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/PREH-zihn-s//ˈpɹɛ.zə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Present (adjective/noun)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PREH-zihn-[t]//ˈpɹɛ.zə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Present (verb)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pree-ZEHN-[t]//pɹiː.zɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Presentable
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” is short, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pree-ZEHN-tuh-bəl//pɹiː.zɛn.tə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Presentation
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Lng “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pree-zehn-TAY-shin//pɹiː.zɛn.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Presently
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PREH-zihn[t]-lee//ˈpɹɛ.zə(ɪ)n[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Presents (noun)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the second “e” turns into an i-schwa

/PREH-zihn-ts//ˈpɹɛ.zə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Preserve
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/pree-Z’R-v//pɹiː.ˈzɚ.v/ – Notice also that the “v” ending acts as a third syllable

Presidency
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PREH-zih-dihn-see//ˈpɹɛ.zə(ɪ).də(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

President
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PREH-zih-dihn[t]//ˈpɹɛ.zə(ɪ).də(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Presidential
– for this word, the “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the first “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ent” suffix – the second “e” is short, and for the “tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/preh-zih-DEHN-shəl//pɹɛ.zɪ.ˈdɛn.ʃəl/

 

Press
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prehs//pɹɛs/

 

Pressure
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/PREH-sh’r//ˈpɹɛ.ʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Prestige
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “g” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/prehs-TEEZH//pɹɛs.ˈtiːʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Prestigious
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “g” is soft, the “i” is silent, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prehs-TEE-dʒihs//pɹɛs.ˈtiː.dʒə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Presumably
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “u” is long, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pree-ZOO-muh-blee//pɹiː.ˈzu.mə(ʌ).bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Pretend
– For this word, the first “e” is long, and the second “e” is short

/pree-TEHN-d//pɹiː.ˈtɛn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Pretexts
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/PREE-teks-ts//ˈpɹiː.tɛks.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending act as a third syllable

 

Pretty
– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply as the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PRHI-dee//pɹə(ɪ).ˈɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Prevail
– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

/prih-VAYL//pɹə(ɪ).ˈveɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Prevalent
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PREH-vuh-lihn-[t]//ˈpɹɛ.və(ʌ).lə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Prevent
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pree-VEHN-[t]//pɹiː.ˈvɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Previous
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PREE-vee-ihs//ˈpɹiː.viː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter P ) –


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