– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter P: Pro ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Pro

 

Pa . Pe . Ph . Pi . Pl . Po . Pra . Pre . Pri . Pru-Pry . Ps . Pu . Py

 

Proactive (pro-Active)
– For this word, the “o” is long, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “o” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” is short, the “c” is hard but (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/proh-Wæ[K]-dihv//pɹo.ˈwæ[k].də(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Probability
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prah-buh-BIH-lih-dee//pɹɑ.bə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Probable
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the second “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/PRAH-buh-bəl//ˈpɹɑ.bə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Probably
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAH-buh-blee//ˈpɹɑ.bə(ʌ).bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Problem
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into an u-schwa

/PRAH-bluhm//ˈpɹɑ.blə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Problems
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into a u-schwa, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PRAH-bluhm-z//ˈpɹɑ.blə(ʌ)m.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Procedure
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “e” is long, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/prə-SEE-dʒ’r//pɹə.ˈsee.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Procedures
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” is long, the “d” is pronounced like the soft “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “e” is silent, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/prə-SEE-dʒ’rz//pɹə.ˈsiː.dʒəɹz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Proceed
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/prə-SEE[D]//pɹə.ˈsiː[ɾ]/

 

Process
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PRAH-sehs//ˈpɹɑ.sɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Processed
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/PRAH-sehs-[t]//ˈpɹɑ.sɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Processes
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “c” is soft, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-es” ending – the “e” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PRAH-sə-seez//ˈpɹɑ.sə.siːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Procession
– For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

/prə-SEH-shihn//prə.ˈsɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Procrastinate
– For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pruh-KRæS-tih-nay[t]//pɹə(ʌ).ˈkɹæs.tə(ɪ).ne[t]/ – Notice that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Procrastinating
– For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pruh-KRæS-tih-nay-ding//pɹə(ʌ).ˈkɹæs.tə(ɪ).ne.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Procrastinator
– For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” (usually) turns into a flap-d, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pruh-KRæS-dih-nay-d’r//pɹə(ʌ).ˈkɹæs.də(ɪ).ne.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Produce (noun)
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/PROH-doos//ˈpɹo.dus/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Produce (verb)
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/prə-DOOS//pɹə.ˈdus/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Produced
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/prə-DOOS-[t]//pɹə.ˈdus.[t]/– Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Producer
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-DOO-s’r//pɹə.ˈdu.sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Product
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/PRAH-duh[k]-t//ˈpɹɑ.də(ʌ)[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Production
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prə-DUH[K]-shihn//pɹə.ˈdʌ[k].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Productive
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-DUH[K]-tihv//pɹə.ˈdʌ[k].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Productivity
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final”y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/proh-duh[k]-TIH-vih-dee//ˌpɹo.də(ʌ)[k].ˈtɪ.və(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the main stress is on the third syllable

 

Products
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but (often) stopped

/PRAH-duh[k]-ts//ˈpɹɑ.ɾʌ[k].ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Profession
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination combines with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-FEH-shihn//pɹə.ˈfɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that –

 

Professional
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination combines with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-FEH-shih-nəl//pɹə.ˈfɛ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Professionalism
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination combines with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-FEH-shih-nəl-ih-zəm//pɹə.ˈfɛ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Professor
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-FEH-s’r//pɹə.ˈfɛ.sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Proficiency
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/prə-FIH-shihn-see//pɹə.ˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Proficient
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/prə-FIH-shihn[t]//pɹə.ˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Proficiently
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-FIH-shihn[t]-lee//pɹə.ˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Profile
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/PROH-fai-y’l//ˈpɹo.faiː.jl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Profit
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PRAH-fih[t]//ˈpɹɑ.fə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Profitable
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAH-fih-duh-bəl//ˈpɹɑ.fə(ɪ).də(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Profitability
– For this word, the “o” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final”y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prah-fih-duh-BIH-lih-dee//pɹɑ.fɪ.də(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Program
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “g” is hard, and the “a” is short

/PROH-græm//ˈpɹo.gɹæm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Progress (noun)
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “g” is hard, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PRAH-grehs//ˈpɹɑ.gɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Progress (verb)
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prə-GREHS//pɹə.ˈgɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Prohibit
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/proh-HIH-bih-[t]//pɹo.ˈhɪ.bə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Prohibited
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” (sometimes) turns into a flap-t, and since the root word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/proh-HIH-bih-dih[d]//pɹo.ˈhɪ.bɪ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Prohibition
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “h” is almost silent, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pro-[h]ə-BIH-shihn//ˌpɹo.[h]əˈbɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the major stress is on the third syllable and that there is a minor stress on the first syllable

 

Project (noun)
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/PRAH-dʒeh[k]-t//ˈpɹɑ.dʒɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Project (verb)
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/prə-dʒE[K]-t//pɹə.dʒɛ[k]-t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Projects
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/PRAH-dʒeh[k]-ts//ˈpɹɑ.dʒɛ[k].ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Projector
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-dʒEH[K]-t’r//pɹə.ˈdʒɛ[k].tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Projectors
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/prə-dʒEH[K]-t’r-z//pɹə.ˈdʒɛ[k].tɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Prolific
– For this word, the “o” is long, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/proh-LIH-fihk//pɹo.ˈlɪ.fɪk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Prominent
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAH-mih-nihn-[t]//ˈpɹɑ.mə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “t” (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Promise
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/PRAH-mihs//ˈpɹɑ.mə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Promising
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAH-mih-sing//ˈpɹɑ.mə(ɪ).sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Promote
– For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/prə-MOH[T]//pɹə.ˈmo[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Promoted
– For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/prə-MOH-dih[d]//pɹə.ˈmo.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Promotion
– For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prə-MOH-shihn//pɹə.ˈmo.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Promotions
– For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), then the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/prə-MOH-shihn-z//pɹə.ˈmo.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Prompt
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/prahm-[p][t]//pɹɑm.[p][t]/ – Notice also that the “pt” combination (regardless of which is stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Promptly
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the “t” is (sometimes) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAHM-[p][t]-lee//ˈpɹɑm.[p][t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pronoun
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination

/PROH-nown//ˈpɹo.naun/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pronounce
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent

/prə-NOWN-s//pɹə.naun.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Pronunciation
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is a short, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prə-nuhn-see-AY-shihn//prə.ˌnʌn.siː.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress is on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Proof
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/proof//pɹuf/

 

Propaganda
– For this word, the first “o” is short, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the second “a” is short, and the third “a” turns into a u-schwa

/prah-puh-GæN-duh//prɑ.pə(ʌ).ˈgæn.də(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Proper
– For this word, the “o” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAH-p’r//ˈpɹɑ.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Properly
– For this word, the “o” is short, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAH-p’r-lee//ˈpɹɑ.pɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Property
– For this word, the first “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PRAH-p’r-dee//ˈpɹɑ.pɚ.ɾi ː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Proportion
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prə-POHR-shihn//pɹə.ˈpoɹ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Proposal
– For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə.POH-zəl//pɹə.ˈpo.zəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Propose
– For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/prə-POHZ//pɹə.ˈpoz / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Proposed
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/prə-POHZ-[D]//pɹə.ˈpoz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Prospect
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PRAHS-peh[k]-[t]//ˈpɹɑs.pɛ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Prospective
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-SPEHK-dihv//pɹə.spɛk.də(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Prosperity
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prahs-PAYR-ih-dee//pɹɑs.peɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Prosperous
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAHS-p’r-ihs//ˈpɹɑs.pɚ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Protect
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/prə-TEH[K]-t//pɹə.ˈtɛ[k].t / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Protection
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prə-TEH[K]-shihn//pɹə.ˈtɛ[k].ʃə(ɪ)n / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Protest
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PROH-tehs[t]//ˈpɹo.tɛs[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Protocol
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the third “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination

/PROH-də.kawl//ˈpɹo.ɾə.kɔl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Prototype
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the first “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” is long, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/PROH-doh-tigh[p]//ˈpɹo.ɾo.tʌiː[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Protruding
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-CHROO-ding//pɹə.ˈtʃɹu.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Proud
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/prow[d]//pɹɑu[ɾ]/

 

Proudest
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PROW-dihs-[t]//ˈpɹau.ɾə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when it is not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Proudly
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PROW-[d]-lee//ˈpɹau.[ɾ].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Prove
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/proov//pɹuv/

 

Proved
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and since the root word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/proov[d]//pɹuv.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Proven
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “e” turns into an i-schwa

/PROO-vihn//ˈpɹu.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Provide
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “e” is silent

/prə-VAI[D]//pɹə.ˈvaiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Provided
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/prə-VAI-dih[d]//pɹə.ˈvaiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ] / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

 

Providing
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-VAI-ding//pɹə.ˈvaiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Provision
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-VIH-zhihn//pɹə.ˈvɪ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Provisions
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/prə-VIH-zhihn-z//pɹə.ˈvɪ.ʒə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Provocative
– For this word, the first “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” (usually) is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pruh-VAH-kuh-dihv//pɹə(ʌ).ˈvɑ.kə(ʌ).ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Proximity
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prahk-SIH-mih-dee//pɹɑkˈsɪ.mə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Proxy
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PRAHK-see//ˈpɹɑk.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter P ) –


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