– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter P:  Pu ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Pu

 

Pa . Pe . Ph . Pi . Pl . Po . Pra . Pre . Pri . Pro . Pru-Pry . Ps . Py

 

Pub
– For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “b” is (sometimes) stopped

/puh[b]//pʌ[b]/

 

Public
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/PUHB-lih[k]//ˈpʌb.lɪ[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Publication
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/puh-blih-KAY-shihn//ˌpʌ.blə(ɪ).ˈkeiː.shə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Publicity
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final”y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/puh-BLIH-sih-dee//pə(ʌ).ˈblɪ.sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Publicizing
– For this word, the “u” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PUH-blih-sai-zing//ˈpʌ.blə(ɪ).saiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Publicly
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is and i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PUH-blihk-lee//ˈpʌ.blə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Publish
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/PUH-blihsh//ˈpʌ.blə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Publishing
– For this word, the “u” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PUH-blih-shing//ˈpʌ.blə(ɪ).ʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Published
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and since the root-word ends with the “sh” sound – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/PUH-blihsh-[t]//ˈpʌb.lə(ɪ)ʃ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Puffiness
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PUH-fee-nis//ˈpʌ.fiː.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pull
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pəl//pəl/

 

Pulled
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l”, the “e” of the “”-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/pəl[d]//pəl[d]/ –

 

Pulling
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-ling//ˈpə.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pulmonary
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PəL-muh-nayr-ee//ˈpəl.mə(ʌ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pulse
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/puhl-s//pʌl.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pulses
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PUHL-sihz//ˈpʌl.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pulverize
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PUHL-v’r-aiz//ˈpə(ʌ)l.vɚ.aiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pulverized
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” disappears,for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the “e” combines with the “ed” ending (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/PUHL-v’r-aiz-[d]//ˈpə(ʌ)l.vɚ.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Pump
– For this word, the “u” is short, the second “p” is (often) stopped

/puhm-[p]//ˈpʌm.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Pumped
– For this word, the “u” is short, the second “p” is stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/PUHM[P]-t//ˈpʌm[p].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Punch
– For this word, the “u” is short

/puhn-ch//pʌn.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Punched
– For this word, the “u” is short, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “ch” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/PUHN-ch-t//ˈpʌn.tʃ.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Punctual
– For this word, the first “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the sound of the hard letter “c” directly after it), the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PUHNG[K]-choo-əl//ˈpʌŋ[k].tʃu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pundits
– For this word, the “u” is short, and the “i” is short

/PUHN-dih-ts//ˈpʌn.dɪ.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” combination acts as a separate syllable

 

Punish
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/PUH-nihsh//ˈpʌ.nə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Punishment
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PUH-nish-mihn[t]//ˈpʌ.nə(ɪ)ʃ.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pupil
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “i” turns into a true-schwa

/PYOO-pəl//ˈpju.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Puppy
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply as a single letter “p”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PUH-pee//ˈpʌ.piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Purchase
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/P’R-chihs//ˈpɚ.tʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Purchasing
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the “-ing” ending is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/P’R-chih-sing//ˈpɚ.tʃə(ɪ).sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Pure
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “e” is silent

/pyoor//pjuɹ/

 

Purely
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PYOOR-lee//ˈpjuɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Purer
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, there is a phantom letter “r” in-between the first “r” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next) and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PYOUR-rər//ˈpjuɹ.ɹɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Purify
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/PYOU-rih-fai//ˈpjuɹ.ɪ.faiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Purified
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “i”, and the final “d” is a flap-d

/PYOU-rih-fai[d]//ˈpjuɹ.ɪ.faiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Purity
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final”y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PYOU-rih-dee//ˈpjuɹ.ə(ɪ)ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Purple
– For this word, the “u” disappears, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/P’R-pəl//ˈpɚ.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Purpose
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the “e” is silent

/P’R-pihs//ˈpəɹ.pə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Purposes
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/P’R-pihs-ihz//ˈpəɹ.pə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Purse
– For this word, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/p’rs//pɚs/

 

Pursue
– For this word, the first “u” disappears, and the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/p’r-SOO//pɚ.ˈsu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Pursuing
– For this word, the first “u” disappears, the second “u” is long, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “u” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-SOO-wing//pɚ.ˈsu.wɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Push
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “book” or “foot”), and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/pəihsh//pəɪʃ/

 

Pushed
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “book” or “foot”), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “sh” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/pəihsh-[t]//pəɪʃ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Pushy
– For this word, the “u” is pronounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “book” or “foot”), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PəIH-shee//ˈpəɪ.ʃiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Put
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “book” or “foott”), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pəih[t]//pəɪ[t]/

 

Puzzle
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “zz” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “z” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/PUH-zəl//ˈpʌ.zəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Puzzled
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “zz” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “z” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/PUH-zəl[d]//ˈpʌ.zəl[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Puzzles
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “zz” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “z” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PUH-zəl-z//ˈpʌ.zəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter P ) –


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