– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter P ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Pp

 

Pe . Ph . Pi . Pl . Po . Pr . Ps . Pu . Py

 

Pace
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/pays/ – /peiːs/ –

Pack
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pæk/ – /pæk/ –

Package
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” is pronounced like the letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PæK-ih-dʒ//ˈpæk.ə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable –

Packaging
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PæK-ih.dʒing//ˈpæk.ə(ɪ).dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Packet
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/-kih[t]/ – /ˈpæ.kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Page
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /pay-dʒ/ – /peiː.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable –

Pageantry
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the “ea” combination turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /-dʒən-chree/ – /ˈpæ.dʒə(i)n.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pain
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/payn/ – /peiːn/ –

Painful (Pain-full)
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAYN-fəl/ – /ˈpeiːn.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Paint
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/payn[t]/ – /peiːn[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Paints
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/payn-ts/ – /peiːn.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Painter
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAYN-t’r/ – /ˈpeiːn.tɚ/ –the stress is on the first syllable –

Painting
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), , and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAYN-ting/ – /ˈpeiːn.tɪŋ/ –the stress is on the first syllable –

Pair
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/payr/ – /peɪɹ/ –

Palace
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/-lihs//ˈpæ.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Palaces
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /-lih-sihz/ – /ˈpæ.lə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Palazzo
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “zz” combination is pronounced like a “ts” combination, and the final “o” is long

/pə-LAH-tsoh//pə.ˈlɑ.tso/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Pale
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/payl//peɪl/

Pan
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/pæn//pæn/

Panel
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/-nəl//ˈPæ.nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pants
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/pæn-ts//pæn.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Paper
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/PAY-p’r/ – /ˈpeiː.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Parachute
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is a u-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “u” is long, the “t” is stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/PAYR-uh-shoo[t]//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).ʃu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Parachuting
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is a u-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “u” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAYR-uh-shoo-ding//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).ʃu.ɾɪŋ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Paradigm
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, and the “g” is silent

/PAYR-uh-daim//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).daiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Paradox
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, and the final “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/PAYR-uh-dah-ks//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).dɑ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Paragraph (para-Graph)
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the third “a” is short, and the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PAYR-uh-græf//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).gɹæf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Paraguay
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the letter “w”, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PAYR-uh-gwai//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).gwaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Parallel
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” is short

– /PAYR-uh-lehl//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).lɛl/ – Notice that the stress is on the first syllable –

Parameter (para-Meter)
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, and for the “-meter” suffix – the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the last “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /pə--mih-d’r//pə.ˈɹæ.mə(ɪ).ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Parameters (para-Meters)
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, for the “-meter” suffix – the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the last “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /pə--mih-d’r-z//pə.ˈɹæ.mə(ɪ).ɾɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Parameterization (para-Meter-ize-ation)
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, for the “-meter” suffix – the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the last “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the third “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /pə--mih-d’r-ai-ZAY-shuhn//pə.ˌɹæ.mə(ɪ).ɾɚ.aiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and the major stress is on the sixth syllable –

Paraplegic
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is a u-schwa, the “e” is long, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/payr-uh-PLEE-dʒih[k]//ˌpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).ˈpliː.dʒə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Parent
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PAYR-ihn[t]/ – /ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Parental
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/puh-REHN-təl/ – /pə(ʌ).ɹˈɛn.təl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Parents
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/PAYR-ihn-ts/ – /ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Park
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/pahr-[k]/ – /pɑɹ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts like a second syllable and that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Parked
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/pahr-[k]-t/ – /pɑɹ-[k].t/ – Notice that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Parliament
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “ia” combination turns into an true-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /PAHR-lə-mihn-[t]//ˈpɑɹ.lə.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Part
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pahr-[t]/ – /pɑɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Partake
 – For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/pahr-TAY[K]//pɑɹ.ˈteiː[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Partaking
 – For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pahr-TAY-king//pɑɹ.ˈteiː.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Participant
 – For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is often (stopped)

/pahr-TIH-sih-pihn-[t]//pɑɹ.ˈtɪ.sə(ɪ).pə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Participants
 – For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pahr-TIH-sih-pihn-ts//pɑɹ.ˈtɪ.sə(ɪ).pə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Participle
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” a flap-t, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa between the “p” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

– /PAHR-dih-sih-pəl/ – /ˈpɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ).sə(ɪ),pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Particular
 – For this word, the “a” disappears, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the last “a” disappears

– /p’r-TIHK-yoo-l’r//pɚ.ˈtɪk.ju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Particularly
 – For this word, the “a” disappears, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” disappears, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /p’r-TIHK-yoo-l’r-lee//pɚ.tɪk.ju.lɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Partly
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAHR-[t]-lee/ – /ˈpɑɹ.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Partner
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAHR[T]-n’r//ˈpɑɹ[t].nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Partnership
 – For this word, For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ship” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAHR[T]-n’r-shih[p]/ – /ˈpɑɹ[t].nɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Parts
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/pahr-ts/ – /pɑɹ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Party
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /PAHR-dee//ˈpɑɹ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pass
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/pæs//pæs/

Passage
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-sih-dʒ//ˈpæ.sə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Passe
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/pæ-SAY//pæ.ˈseiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Passed
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” is silent, and the “d” ending sounds like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /pæs-t//pæs.t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Passenger
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” ending is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-sihn-dʒɚ//ˈpæ.sə(ɪ)n.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Passing
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-sing//ˈpæ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Passion
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a true-schwa

– /-shən//ˈpæ.ʃən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Passionate
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “io” combination turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-shih-nih[t]//ˈpæ.ʃə(ɪ)nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Passport (Pass-Port)
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PæS-pohr[t]//ˈpæs.poɹ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Past
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/pæs[t]//pæs[t]/

Pasta
 – For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/PAHS-tuh//ˈpɑs.tə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Paste
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/PAYS-[t]//ˈpeiːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Pastries
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /PAYS-chreez/ – /ˈpeiːs.tʃɹiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pasture
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “e” is silent

/PæS-ch’r/ – /pæs.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pastures
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PæS-ch’r-z/ – /pæs.tʃɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Patch
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/-ch/ – /ˈpæ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ch” combination acts as a separate syllable –

Patches
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/-chihz/ – /ˈpæ.tʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Patent
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent, and the final “t” is also (usually) stopped

– /-[t]n[t]//ˈpæ.[t]ən[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Patented
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /-[t]n-tih[d]//ˈpæ.[t]ən.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Path
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/pæth//pæð/

Patience
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-scwha, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /PAY-shihn-s//ˈpeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Patient
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “t” is (often) stopped

– /PAY-shihn[t]//ˈpeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Patients
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

– /PAY-shihn-ts//ˈpeɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Patio
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “o” is long

/-dee-oh/ – /ˈpæ.ɾiː.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Patriarchal
 – For this word, the first “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /pay-chree-AHR-kəl/ – /peiː.tʃɹiː.ˈɑɹ.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Patricia
 – For this name, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /puh-CHRIH-shuh//pə(ʌ).ˈtʃɹɪ.ʃə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Patriot
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PAY-chree-ih[t]/ – /ˈpeiː.tʃɹiː.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Patriotic
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard

/pay-chree-AH-dihk/ – /peiː.tʃɹiː.ˈɑ.ɾə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Patriotism (Patriot-ism)
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAY-chree-uh-tih-zəm/ – /ˈpeiː.tʃɹiː.ə(ʌ).tɪ.zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Patron
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /PAY-chrihn//ˈpeiː.tʃɹə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pattern
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

– /-d’rn//ˈpæ.ɾɚn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pause
– For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/pawz//pɔz/

Pavilion
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the second “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/puh-VIHL-ee-yihn//pə(ʌ).ˈvɪl.iː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Pavilions
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the second “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/puh-VIHL-ee-yihn-z//pə(ʌ).ˈvɪl.iː.jə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Pay
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pay//peiː/

Payment (Pay-ment)
– For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PAY-mihn-[t]//ˈpeiː.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pe

Peace
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/pees//piːs/

Peaceful (Peace-full)
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PEES-fəl//ˈpiːs.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Peak
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/pee[k]/ – /piː[k]/ –

Pear
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/payr//peɪɹ/

Peasant
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PEH-zihn-[t]//ˈpɛ.zihn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Peasantry
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PEH-zihn-chree//ˈpɛ.zihn.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pebble
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PEH-bəl//ˈpɛ.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pebbles
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PEH-bəl-z//ˈpɛ.bəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pecan
 – For this word, (though many people, especially in Great Britain and the southern United States pronounce this with the short “a” – in The Common Tongue...) the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/pee.kahn//piː.kɑn/ – Notice also that there is no discernible major stress, it can be equally on both, or either of the two –

Peculiar
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a”, and the “a” disappears

/pə-KYOO-lee-y’r//pə.ˈkju.liː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Peculiarities
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/pə-kyoo-lee-AYR-ih-deez//pə.ˌkju.liː.ˈeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the main stress is on the fourth syllable

Pedestrians
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/pə-DEHS-chree-ihn-z//pə.ˈdɛs.tʃɹiː.ə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Pedigree
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PEH-dih-gree/ – /ˈpɛ.ɾə(ɪ).gɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Peel
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and there is a phantom consonant letter “y” and a phantom-schwa in-between the second “e” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

– /PEE-yəl/ – /ˈpiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pen
– For this word, the “e” is short

/pehn//pɛn/

Pens
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/pehn-z//pɛn.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending is acts as a separate syllable

Pence
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /pehn-s//pɛn.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable –

Pencil
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “i” disappears

/pehn-sl//ˈpɛn.sl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pendulum
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the first “u” turns into a true-schwa, the second “u” is a u-schwa

/PEHN-dʒə-luhm/ – /ˈpɛn.dʒə.lə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Penny
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PEH-nee//ˈpɛ.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pension
 – For this word, the “e” is short, for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PEHN-shihn/ – /ˈpɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pensioner
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PEHN-shihn-‘r/ – /ˈpɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

People
 – For this word, the “eo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /PEE-pəl//ˈpiː.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pepper
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PEH-p’r//ˈpɛ.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Percent
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/p’r-SEHN-[t]/ – /pɚ.ˈsɛn[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Percentage
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-SEHN-tih-dʒ/ – /pɚ.ˈsɛn.tə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Percentile
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ile” suffix – the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-SEHN-tail/ – /pɚ.ˈsɛn.taiːl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Perceptive
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the second “p” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-SEH[P]-tihv//pɚ.ˈsɛ[p].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Perfect (adjective)
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/P’R-fih[ct]//ˈpɚ.fə(ɪ)[kt]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Perfect (verb)
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/p’r-FEH[KT]//pɚ.ˈfɛ[kt]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Perfectionist (Perfect-tion-ist)
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /p’r-FEHK-shihn-ihs-[t]//pɚ.ˈfɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n.ɪs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Perfectly
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the final “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/P’R-fih[kt]-lee//ˈpɚ.fə(ɪ)[kt]-lee/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Perform
– For this word, the “e” disappears, and the “o” is long

/p’r-FOHR-m//pɚ.ˈfoɹ.m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “m” ending acts as a second syllable

Performance
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, the “o” is long, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /p’r-FOHR-mihn-s//pɚɹ.ˈfoɹ.mə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Performances
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “o” is long, for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the joins with the “-es” ending and so turns into an i-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /p’r-FOHR-mihn-sihz//pɚ.foɹ.mə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Performer
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “o” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-FOHR-m’r//pɚ.ˈfoɹ.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Perfume
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you” and the final “e” is silent

– /p’r-FYOUM//pɚ.ˈfjum/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Perhaps
– For this word, the “e” disappears, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the “p” is (often) stopped

/p’r-HæP-s//pɚ.ˈhæp.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Period
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /PEE-ree-ih[d]//ˈpiːɹ.iː.ə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Periodically
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /peer-ee-AH-dih[k]-lee//piːɹ.iː.ˈɑ.ɾɪ[k].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable –

Peripheral
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “i” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard
pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-IH-f’r-əl//pɚ.ˈɪ.fɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Perishes
 – For this word, the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and the “e” of the “-es” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/PAYR-ih-shihz//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Perks
 – For this word, the “e” disappears

/p’r-ks//pɚ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

Permanent
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/P’R-mə-nihn-[t]//ˈpɚ.mə.nə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Permission
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the first “i” is short, the first “s” joins with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-MIH-shihn//pɚ.ˈmɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Permit (noun)
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/P’R-mih[t]//ˈpɚ.mə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Permit (verb)
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/p’r-MIH[T]//pɚ.ˈmɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Perpetrator
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “o” disappears

/P’R-pə-chray-d’r//ˈpɚ.pə.tʃɹeiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Perpetrators
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “o” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/P’R-pə-chray-d’rz//ˈpɚ.pə.tʃɹeiː.ɾɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Persevere
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” turns into a u-schwa, the third “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/p’r-suh-VEER//pɚ.sə(ʌ).ˈviːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Persistent
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “i” is short, ə ( ɪ )n[t] – , and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-SIHS-tihn-[t]//pɚ.ˈsɪs.tə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

Person
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, and the “o” turns into a true-schwa

/P’R-sən//ˈpɚ.sən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Personal
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, the “o” turns into a true-schwa,  and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /P’R-sə-nəl//ˈpɚ.sən.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Personality
– For this word, the “e” disappears, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-sən-æ-lih-dee//pɚ.sən.ˈæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that –

Personally
– For this word, the “e” disappears, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/P’R-sən-ə-lee//ˈpɚ.sən.ə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Personnel
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” is short

– /p’r-sən-EHL/ – /pɚ.sən.ˈɛl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Perspective
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but it is (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /p’r-SPEHK-tihv//pɚ.ˈspɛk.də(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Persuade
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “su” combination is pronounced like an “sw” combination, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /p’r-SWAY[D]//pɚ.ˈsweiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Persuaded
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “su” combination is pronounced like an “sw” combination, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /p’r-SWAY-dih[d]/ – /pɚ.ˈsweiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Persuading
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, the “su” combination is pronounced like an “sw” combination, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /p’r-SWAY-ding//pɚ.ˈsweiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Persuasion
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, the “su” combination is pronounced like an “sw” combination, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced version of the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-SWAY-zhihn/ – /pɚ.ˈsweiː.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Persuasive
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “su” combination is pronounced like an “sw” combination, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /p’r-SWAY-sihv//pɚ.ˈsweiː.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Peru
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced like a True Long “A”, the “r” is a single “rolled” r (which sounds exactly like the flad-d or flap-t) and the “u” is long (This is NOT the standard pronunciation of this country-name in English, but one of the main principles of The Common Tongue is that – names of people, places, and things  – from other countries and cultures should be pronounced as closely to the way the natives of that culture pronounce it.)

– /pay-ROO/ – /pe.ˈɾu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Peruvian
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced likea True Long “A”, the “r” is a single “rolled” r (which sounds exactly like the flad-d or flap-t) and the “u” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (This is NOT the standard pronunciation of this country-name in English, but one of the main principles of The Common Tongue is that – names of people, places, and things  – from other countries and cultures should be pronounced as closely to the way the natives of that culture pronounce it.)

– /pay-ROO/ – /pe.ˈɾu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Pessimism
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” turns into an -i-schwa, and for the “-ism” suffix – and the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounce almost like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PEH-sə-mih-zəm//ˈpɛ.sə.mə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Pessimist
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix – and the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PEH-sə-muhs-[t]//ˈpɛ.sə.mə(ʌ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Pet
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/peh[t]//pɛ[t]/ – Notice also that –

Petrol
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “o” is long

/PEH-chrohl//ˈpɛ.tʃɹol/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Petroleum
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is long, the second “e” is long, and the “u” turns into a u-schwa

– /pih-TROH-lee-uhm//pə(ɪ).ˈtʃɹo.liː.ə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ph

Pharmaceutical
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” turns into a i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “eu” is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /fahrm-ih-SOO-dih-k’l//fɑɹ.mə(ɪ).ˈsu.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Pharmaceuticals
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” turns into a i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “eu” is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), And the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

– /fahrm-ih-SOO-dih-k’l-z//fɑɹ.mə(ɪ).ˈsu.ɾə(ɪ).kəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Phase
 – For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/fayz//feiːz/

Philippines
 – For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the third “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/FIH-lih-PEEN-z//ˈfɪ.lɪ.ˈpiːn.z/ – Notice also that the major stress can be on either the first or the third syllable but is not used on both; only one-or-the-other –

Philosophy
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-osophy” suffix – the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/fih-LAH-sə-fee//fə(ɪ).ˈlɑ.sə.fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Phobia
 – For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

/FOH-bee-uh//ˈfo.biː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Phone
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/fohn//fon/

Phoneme
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the first “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/FOH-neem//ˈfo.niːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Photo
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” is long

/FOH-doh//ˈfo.ɾo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Photocopier
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the third “o” is short, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and there is a phantom consonant letter “y” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/FOH-doh-kah-pee-y’r//ˈfo.ɾo.kɑ.piː.jɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Photocopy (photo-Copy)
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the third “o” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/FOH-doh-kah-pee//ˈfo.ɾo.kɑ.piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Photograph (photo-Graph)
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/FOH-də-græf//ˈfo.ɾə.ɡɹæf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Photographer (photo-Graph-er)
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into an u-schwa, the second “ph” combination also is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /fə-TAH-grə(ʌ)-f’r/ – /fə.ˈtɑ.ɡɹə(ʌ).fɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Photographers (photo-Graph-ers)
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into an u-schwa, the second “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/fə-TAH-grə(ʌ)-f’r-z/ – /fə.ˈtɑ.ɡɹə(ʌ).fɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Photographic (photo-Graph-ic)
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), , and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/foh-duh-GRæ-fihk/ – /fo.ɾə(ʌ).ˈgæ.fə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Photographing (photo-Graph-ing)
– For this word, the “ph” combination sounds like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ph” combination sounds like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FOH-duh-græ-fing/ – /ˈfo.ɾə(ʌ).gɹæ.fɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Photography (photo-Graph-y)
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” disappears, the second “o” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /f’-TAH-gruh-fee//fə.ˈtɑ.gɹə(ʌ).fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Phrase
 – For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/frayz/ – /fɹeiːz/ –

Phrases
 – For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /FRAY-zihz//ˈfɹeiː.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Physical
 – For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FIH-zih-kəl//ˈfɪ.zə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Physically
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is one of two standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FIH-zihk-lee//ˈfɪ.zə(ɪ)k.li ː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Physician
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “y” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/fə-ZIH-shihn//fə.ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Physics
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FIH-zih-ks//ˈfɪ.zə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable –

Pi

Pianist
 – For this word, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PEE-uh-nih-s[t]/ – /ˈpiː.ə(ʌ).nɪ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Piano
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is short, and the final “o” is long

– /pee-æ-noh//piː.ˈæ.no/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Pick
– For this word, “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pihk//pɪk/ – Notice also that –

Picked
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) however, in this word it is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/pih[k]-t//pɪ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Picnic
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the second “i” is short, and the final “c” is hard

/PIH[K]-nihk/ – /ˈpɪ[k].nɪk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Picture
– For this word, “i” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PIHK-ch’r//ˈpɪk.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Picturesque (Picture-esque)
– For this word, “i” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “e” combines with the “-esque” suffix, and for the “-esque” suffix – the “e” is short, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k” but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/pihk-ch’r-EHS-[k]//pɪk.tʃɚ.ˈɛs.[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Pie
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the singlelong letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /pai//paiː/

Piece
– For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/pees//piːs/ – Notice also that –

Pieces
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PEE-sihz/ – /ˈpiː.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pier
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/peer//piːɹ/

Pig
– For this word, “i” is short, and the “g” is hard

/pihg//pɪg/ – Notice also that –

Pile
– For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/PAI-y’l//ˈpaiː.jl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Piles
 – For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /PAI-yl’z//ˈpaiː.jlz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pilgrimage
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “g” is hard, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PIHL-grih-mihdʒ//ˈpɪl.gɹə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pill
– For this word, “i” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pihl//pɪl/

Pilot
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PAI-lih[t]//ˈpaiː.lə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Piloting
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAI-lih-ting//ˈpaiː.lə(ɪ).ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pin
– For this word, “i” is short

/pihn//pɪn/ – Notice also that –

Pine
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/pain//paiːn/ – Notice also that there is no discernible word-stress –

Pineapple
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

– /PAI-næ-pəl//ˈpaiː.næ.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pink
– For this word, “i” is short, and the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/ping-k//pɪŋ.k / – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Pint
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/pighn-[t]/ – /pɑ(ʌ)iːn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Pipe
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/pighp//ˈpʌiːp/

Piracy
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /PIGH-ruh-see//ˈpʌiː.rə(ʌ).siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pissy
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PIH-see//ˈpɪ.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pistachio
 – For this word, the first “i” disappears, the “a” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “o” is long

– /pih-STæ-shee-oh//pɪ.stæ.ʃiː.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Pitch
– For this word, “i” is short, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pih-ch//pɪ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Pitfall
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PIH[T]-fawl//ˈpɪ[t].fɔl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pity
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /PIH-dee//ˈpɪ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pivot
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

– /PIH-vih[t]//ˈpɪ.vɪ[t]/ –  Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pizza
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “zz” combination is pronounced like a “ts” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/PEE-tsuh//ˈpiː.tʃə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fist syllable

Pl

Place
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/plays//pleiːs/

Placed
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “c” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/PLAYS-[t]//ˈpleiːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Place-Mat
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, the “e” is silent, the second “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PLAYS-mæ[t]//ˈpleiːs.mæ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Plain
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/playn//pleiːn/

Plan
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/plæn//plæn/

Plane
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/playn//pleiːn/

Planet
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PLæ-nih[t]//ˈplæ.nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Planned
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /plæn-d//plæn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable –

Planning
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PLæ-ning//ˈplæ.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plant
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/plæn-[t]//ˈplæn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Plastic
– For this word, the “a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PLæ-stih[k]//ˈplæ.stə(ɪ)[k] / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plate
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/play'[t]/ – /pleiː[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Platform
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the “o” is long

/PLæ[T].fohr-m//ˈplæ[t].foɹ.m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “m” ending acts as a third syllable –

Play
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/play//pleiː/

Player
– For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition between one sound and the next), and the “e” disappears

/PLAY-y’r//ˈpleiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plays
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/play-z//pleiː.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

Pleasant
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PLEH-zihn-[t]//ˈplɛ.zə(ɪ)n.[t]/Notice also that the the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Please
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/pleez/ – /pliːz/ –

Pleased
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/pleez-[d]/ – /pliːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Pleasure
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the short letter “e”, and for the “-sure” suffix – the “s” is pronounced like voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PLEH-zh’r//ˈplɛ.ʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plenty
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PLEN-tee//ˈplɛn.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plot
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/plah[t]//plɑ[t]/

Plug
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “g” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /pluh[g]//plʌ[g]/

Plumber
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is silent, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PLUHM-‘r//ˈplʌm.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plummet
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PUH-mih[t]//ˈplʌ.mə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plummeted
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d (often) stopped

/PUH-mih-tih[d]//ˈplʌ.mə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plunge
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /pluhn-dʒ//plʌn.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable –

Plunging
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced normally (the placement of the letter “g” directly after it does not affect the pronunciation), the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PLUHN-dʒing//ˈplʌn.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plural
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PL’R-əl//ˈplɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Plus
 – For this word, the “u” is short

– /pluhs/ – /plʌs/ –

Po

Podcast
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but (often) stopped, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PAH[D]-kæs[t]/ – /ˈpɑ[ɾ].kæs[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pocket
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PAH-kih[t]//ˈpɑ.kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Podium
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “u” is a u-schwa

/POH-dee-uhm//ˈpo.diː.ə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Poem
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” turns into a true-schwa but almost disappears

/POH-əm//ˈpo.əm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Poetry
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/POH-ih-chree//ˈpo.ə(ɪ).tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Poinsettia
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/poyn-SEH-dee-yuh//poiːn.ˈsɛ.ɾiː.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Point
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/poyn.[t]//poiːn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Pointed
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-words ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/POYN-tih[d]//ˈpoiːn.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Poise
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/poyz//poiːz./

Poised
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/poyz-[d]//poiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Poison
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

/POY-zihn//ˈpoiː.zə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Poisonous
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/POY-zih-nihs//ˈpoiːzə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Poke
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/po[k]//po[k]/

Poked
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/po[k]-t//po[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Pole
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/pohl//pol/

Police
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /puh-LEES//pə(ʌ).ˈliːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Policies
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /PAH-lih-seez//ˈpɑ.lə(ɪ).siːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Policy
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PAH-lih-see//ˈpɑ.lə(ɪ).siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Polish (adjective)
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/POHL-ihsh//ˈpol-ə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Polish (verb)
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/PAH-lihsh//ˈpɑ.lə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Polished
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “sh” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (sometimes) stopped

/PAH-lihsh-[t]//ˈpɑ.lə(ɪ)ʃ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Polite
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ite” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/pə-LIGH[T]//pə.ˈlʌiː[t] / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Politely
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ite” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pə-LIGH[T]-lee//pə.ˈlʌiː[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Political
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pə-LIH-dih-kəl//pə.ˈlɪ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Politically
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pə-LIH-dihk-lee//pə.ˈlɪ.ɾə(ɪ)k.li ː/ – Notice also that –

Politician
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, for the “-cian” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /pah-lih-TIH-shən/ – /pɑ.lə(ɪ).ˈtɪ.ʃən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Politicians
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, for the “-cian” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /pah-lih-TIH-shən-z/ – /pɑ.lə(ɪ).ˈtɪ.ʃən.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Politics
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PAH-lih-tih-ks//ˈpɑ.lə(ɪ).tɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Polka
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “l” is almost silent, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/POHL-kuh//ˈpol.kə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pollution
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “u” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pə-LOO-shihn//pə.ˈlu.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Pool
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pool//pul/ – Notice also that –

Poor
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /pohr//poɹ/

Pop
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

– /pah[p]/ – /pɑ[p]/ –

Popping
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAH-ping//ˈpɑ.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Popular
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “a” disappears

– /PAHP-you-l’r//ˈpɑp.ju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Populated
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a TRUE Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is s flap-d but is (often) stopped

/PAH-pyou-lay-dih[d]/ – /ˈpɑp.ju.le.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Population
 – For this word, the “o” is shoret, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pah-pyou-LAY-shihn//pɑ.pju.ˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Populous
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAH-pyou-lihs//ˈpɑ.pju.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Porch
 – For this word, the “o” is long

/pohr-ch//poɹ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Pornography (porno-Graph-y)
– For this word, the first “o” is long, the second “o” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a”turns into a true-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the final “y”

/pohr-NAH-grə-fee/ – /poɹ.ˈnɑ.gɹə.fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Port
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pohr-[t]//poɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Portable
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/POHR-də-bəl//ˈpoɹ.də(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Portfolio
 – For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the second “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “o” is long

/pohr[t]-FOH-lee-oh//poɹ[t].ˈfo.liː.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Portugal
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “r” is a flap-r (like a rolled “r” but rolled only once), the “u” is long, the “g” is hard, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o” (This word contains sounds which are not native to English, but in The Common Tongue, we pronounced Names of cities and countries and other “native” words as close as possible to the native pronunciation)

– /pohr-too-GAHL//poɹ.tu.ˈgɑl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Portuguese
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “r” is a flap-r (like a rolled “r” but rolled only once), the “u” is long, the “g” is hard, the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /pohr-too-GEEZ//poɹ.tu.ˈgiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Pose
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/pohz//poz/ –

Poser
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /POH-z’r//ˈpo.zɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Poses
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/pohz//poz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Posh
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/pahsh//pɑʃ/

Position
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is short, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the last “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /pə-ZIH-shihn//pə.ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Positioned
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is short, for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/pə-ZIH-shihn-d//pə.ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Positions
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is short, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the last “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /pə-ZIH-shuhnz//pə-ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)nz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Positive
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the first letter “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PAH-zih-dihv//ˈpɑ.zə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Positively
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the first letter “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PAH-zih-tihv//ˈpɑ.zə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Possess
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “ss” combination is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /pə-ZEHS//pə.ˈzɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Possession
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “ss” combination is pronounced like the single letter “z”, the “e” is short, the second “ss” combinations with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-sion” combination – and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pə-ZEH-shihn//pə.ˈzɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Possibility
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pah-sih-BIH-lih-dee//ˌpɑ.sə(ɪ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the main stress is on the third syllable

Possible
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /PAH-sih-bəl//ˈpɑ.sə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Possibly
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAH-sih-blee//ˈpɑ.sə(ɪ).bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Post
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pohs-[t]//ˈpos.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Posted
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/POH-stih[d]//ˈpo.stə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Poster
– For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/POHS-t’r//ˈpos.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Post-Graduate
 – For this hyphenated compound word, the “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, then the “G” is hard, the “a” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /pohs[t]-GRæ-dʒoo-ih[t]//pos[t].ˈgɹæ.dʒu.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Postmark (post-Mark)
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/POHS[T]-mahr[k]/ – /ˈpos[t].mɑɹ[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Postpone
 – For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the second “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/pohs[t]-POHN/ – /pos[t].ˈpon/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Postponed
 – For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the second “o” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n”– the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/pohs[t]-POHN-d/ – /pos[t].ˈpon.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Posture
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/PAHS-ch’r//ˈpɑs.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pot
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pah[t]//pɑt/

Potato
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a u-schwathe “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the final “o” is long

/puh-TAY-doh//pə(ʌ).ˈte.ɾo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Potatoes
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwathe “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “oe” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /puh-TAY-dohz//pə(ʌ).ˈte.ɾoz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Potential
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /puh-TEHN-shəl/ – /pə(ʌ).ˈtɛn.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Pound
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “d” is (usually) stopped

/pown-[d]//pɑun.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Pour
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/pohr//poɹ/

Pouring
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pohr-ing//ˈpoɹ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Poverty
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /PAH-v’r-dee//ˈpɑ.vɚ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Powder
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/POW-d’r//ˈpɑu.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Power
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/POW-‘r//ˈpɑu.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Powerful
– For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAH-w’r-fəl//ˈpɑ.wɚ.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pr

Practical
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “c” is hard but almost disappears, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRæ[K]-tih-kəl//ˈpɹæ[k].tə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Practically
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “c” is hard but almost disappears, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRæK-tihk-lee/ – /ˈpɹæk.tə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Practice
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the first “c” is hard but almost disappears, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /PRæK-tihs//ˈpɹæk.tɪs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Practices
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the first “c” is hard but almost disappears, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PRæK-tih-sihz/ – /ˈpɹæk.tə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Practicing
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the first “c” is hard but almost disappears, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRæK-tihs-ing//ˈpɹæk.tə(ɪ).sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Praise
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/prayz//pɹez/

Praised
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” joins with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/prayz-[d]/ – /pɹez.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Praising
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” sounds like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PRAY-zing//ˈpɹe.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Prance
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/præn-s//pɹæn.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable –

Prancing
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRæN-sing//ˈpɹæn.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Prawn
 – For this word, the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” or “saw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prawn//pɹɔn/

Pray
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pray//pɹeiː/ – Notice also that –

Prayed
 – For this word, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like The True Long “A” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root word ends with the sound of the letter “a” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

– /pray[d]/ – /pɹe[ɾ]/

Prayer
 – For this word, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the sound of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAY-‘r//ˈpɹeɪ.ɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Precious
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PREH-shihs//ˈpɹɛ.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Precise
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/prih-SIGHS//pɹə(ɪ).ˈsʌiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Precisely
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pree-SIGHS-lee//pɹiː.ˈsʌiːs.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Precipice
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “c” is soft, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/PREH-sih-pihs//ˈpɹɛ.sə(ɪ).pə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Predict (pre-Dict)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/prih-DIH[K]-t//pɹə(ɪ).ˈdɪ[k].t/Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Predictability (pre-Dict-ability)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ability” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prih-dih[k]-tuh-BIH-lih-dee//pɹə(ɪ).ˌdɪ[k].tə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that there is a minor stress on the fourth syllable

Predicts (pre-Dict-s)
– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/prih-DIHK-ts/ – /pɹə(ɪ).ˈdɪ[k].ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Predominantly (pre-Dominant-ly)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prih-DAH-mih-nihn[t]-lee/ – /pɹə(ɪ).ˈdɑ.mə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)n[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Preemptively
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between both letters “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the second “e” is short, the “p” is (often) stopped, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pree-YEHM[P]-tihv-lee//pɹiːˈjɛm[p].tə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Prefabricated (pre-Fabricated)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the first “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/pree--brih-kay-dih[d]/ – /priː.ˈfæ.bɹɪ.keiː.ɾɪ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable 

Prefer
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prih-F’R//pɹə(ɪ).ˈfɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Preferable (Prefer-able)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PREH-fruh-bəl//ˈpɹɛ.fɹə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Preference
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft,
and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PREH-frihn-s//ˈpɹɛ.fɹə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable –

Preferred
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/pree-F’R[D]//pɹiːˈfɚ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Pregnancies
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PREH[G]-nihn-seez/ – /ˈpɹɛ[g].nə(ɪ)n.siːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Pregnancy
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PREH[G]-nihn-see/ – /ˈpɹɛ[g].nə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Pregnant
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “g” is hard, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PREHG-nihn-[t]//ˈpɹɛg.nə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Prejudice (pre-Judge-ice)
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent

– /PREH-dʒə-dihs//ˈpɹɛ.dʒə.dɪs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Preliminary
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /prə-LIH-mih-nayr-ee/ – /pɹə.ˈlɪ.mə(ɪ).neɪɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Premature (pre-Mature)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “a”turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

– /pree-muh-CH’R//pɹiː.mə(ʌ).tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Premises
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa

/PREH-mih-sihs//ˈpɹɛ.mə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Preparation
 – for this word, the “e” is short, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/preh-pə-RAY-shihn/ – /ˌpɹɛ.pə.ˈɹeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Prepare
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

– /pree-PAYR//pɹiː.ˈpeɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Prepared
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /pree-PAYR-[d]//pɹiː.ˈpeɪɹ.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Preparedness
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” combines with the “-ed” suffix and turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /pree-PAYR-ih[d]-nihs//pɹiː.ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)[d].nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Presence
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounces like the letter “z”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/PREH-zihn-s//ˈpɹɛ.zə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Present (adjective/noun)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PREH-zihn-[t]//ˈpɹɛ.zə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Present (verb)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /pree-ZEHN-[t]//pɹiː.zɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Presentable
– For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” is short, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /pree-ZEHN-tuh-bəl//pɹiː.zɛn.tə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Presentation
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Lng “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pree-zehn-TAY-shin//pɹiː.zɛn.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Presently
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PREH-zihn[t]-lee/ – /ˈpɹɛ.zə(ɪ)n[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Presents (noun)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the second “e” turns into an i-schwa

– /PREH-zihn-ts//ˈpɹɛ.zə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Preserve
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/pree-Z’R-v//pɹiː.ˈzɚ.v/ – Notice also that the “v” ending acts as a third syllable

Presidency
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PREH-zih-dihn-see/ – /ˈpɹɛ.zə(ɪ).də(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

President
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PREH-zih-dihn[t]//ˈpɹɛ.zə(ɪ).də(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Presidential
 –  for this word, the “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the first “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ent” suffix – the second “e” is short, and for the “tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/preh-zih-DEHN-shəl/ – /pɹɛ.zɪ.ˈdɛn.ʃəl/ –

Press
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prehs//pɹɛs/

Pressure
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/PREH-sh’r/ – /ˈpɹɛ.ʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Prestige
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “g” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

– /prehs-TEEZH//pɹɛs.ˈtiːʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Prestigious
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “g” is soft, the “i” is silent, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /prehs-TEE-dʒihs//pɹɛs.ˈtiː.dʒə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Presumably
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “u” is long, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pree-ZOO-muh-blee//pɹiː.ˈzu.mə(ʌ).bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Pretend
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, and the second “e” is short

/pree-TEHN-d//pɹiː.ˈtɛn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Pretexts
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/PREE-teks-ts//ˈpɹiː.tɛks.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending act as a third syllable –

Pretty
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply as the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PRHI-dee//pɹə(ɪ).ˈɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Prevail
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

– /prih-VAYL//pɹə(ɪ).ˈveɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Prevalent
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PREH-vuh-lihn-[t]/ – /ˈpɹɛ.və(ʌ).lə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Prevent
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pree-VEHN-[t]//pɹiː.ˈvɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Previous
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PREE-vee-ihs//ˈpɹiː.viː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Price
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/prighs//pɹʌiːs/

Prices
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PRIGH-sihz//ˈpɹʌiː.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pricey
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the “ey” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/PRIGH-see//ˈpɹʌiː.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pricing
 – For this word, the first “i” is pronounce like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRIGH-sing//ˈprʌiː.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pride
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/prai[d]//pɹaiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Priest
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pree-s[t]//pɹiː.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a second syllable

Primarily
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /prai-MAYR-ih-lee//pɹaiː.ˈmeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Primary
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PRAI-mayr-ee//ˈpɹaiː.meɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Prime
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /praim//pɹaiːm/

Prince
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /prihn-s//pɹɪn.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable –

Princess
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PRIHN-sehs//ˈpɹɪn.sɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Principle
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/PRIHN-sih-pəl//ˈpɹɪn.sə(ɪ).pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Print
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/prihn-[t]//ˈpɹɪn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Prints
 – For this word, the first “i” is short

/prihn-ts//ˈpɹɪn.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Printer
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRIHN-t’r//ˈpɹɪn.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Printing
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRIHN-ting//ˈpɹɪn.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Prior
 – For this word, the “i”is long, and the “o” disappears

– /PRAI-’r//ˈpɹaiː.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Prioritize
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, the first “o” is long, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /prai-OHR-ih-taiz//pɹaiː.ˈoɹ.ə(ɪ).taɪz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Prioritization
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, the first “o” is long, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /prai-ohr-ih-tai-ZAY-shin//pɹaiː.oɹ.ə(ɪ).taiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fifth syllable –

Priority
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, the “o” is long, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /prai-OHR-ih-dee//pɹaiː.oɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Prison
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /PRIH-zihn//ˈpɹɪ.zə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Prisoner
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “o” disappears, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRIHZ-n’r//ˈpɹɪz.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Privacy
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-acy” suffix – the second “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAI-və-see//ˈpraiː.və.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Private
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /PRAI-vih[t]//ˈpɹaiː.və(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Privatization
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is long, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prai-vih-tai-ZAY-shihn/ – /ˌpɹaiː.və(ɪ).taiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Prize
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/praiz//ˈpɹaiːz/

Proactive (pro-Active)
– For this word, the “o” is long, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “o” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” is short, the “c” is hard but (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /proh-Wæ[K]-dihv//pɹo.ˈwæ[k].də(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Probability
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prah-buh-BIH-lih-dee//pɹɑ.bə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Probable
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the second “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/PRAH-buh-bəl//ˈpɹɑ.bə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Probably
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PRAH-buh-blee//ˈpɹɑ.bə(ʌ).bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Problem
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into an u-schwa

– /PRAH-bluhm//ˈpɹɑ.blə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Problems
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into a u-schwa, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /PRAH-bluhm-z//ˈpɹɑ.blə(ʌ)m.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Procedure
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “e” is long, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/prə-SEE-dʒ’r//pɹə.ˈsee.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Procedures
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” is long, the “d” is pronounced like the soft “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “e” is silent, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /prə-SEE-dʒ’rz//pɹə.ˈsiː.dʒəɹz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Proceed
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/prə-SEE[D]//pɹə.ˈsiː[ɾ]/ –

Process
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” is short, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /PRAH-sehs//ˈpɹɑ.sɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Processed
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /PRAH-sehs-[t]//ˈpɹɑ.sɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Processes
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “c” is soft, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-es” ending – the “e” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /PRAH-sə-seez//ˈpɹɑ.sə.siːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Procession
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the second “o” turns into an i-schwa

/prə-SEH-shihn//prə.ˈsɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Procrastinate
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue) 

– /pruh-KRæS-tih-nay[t]//pɹə(ʌ).ˈkɹæs.tə(ɪ).ne[t]/ – Notice that the stress is on the second syllable –

Procrastinating
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwathe second “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /pruh-KRæS-tih-nay-ding//pɹə(ʌ).ˈkɹæs.tə(ɪ).ne.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice that the stress is on the second syllable –

Procrastinator
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the letter “d”, the “i” turns into an i-schwathe second “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” (usually) turns into a flap-d, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /pruh-KRæS-dih-nay-d’r//pɹə(ʌ).ˈkɹæs.də(ɪ).ne.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Produce (noun)
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/PROH-doos//ˈpɹo.dus/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Produce (verb)
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/prə-DOOS/ – /pɹə.ˈdus/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Produced
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/prə-DOOS-[t]//pɹə.ˈdus.[t]/– Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Producer
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-DOO-s’r//pɹə.ˈdu.sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Product
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/PRAH-duh[k]-t//ˈpɹɑ.də(ʌ)[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Production
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prə-DUH[K]-shihn//pɹə.ˈdʌ[k].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Productive
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-DUH[K]-tihv//pɹə.ˈdʌ[k].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Productivity
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final”y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/proh-duh[k]-TIH-vih-dee//ˌpɹo.də(ʌ)[k].ˈtɪ.və(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the main stress is on the third syllable

Products
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but (often) stopped

– /PRAH-duh[k]-ts//ˈpɹɑ.ɾʌ[k].ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Profession
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination combines with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-FEH-shihn//pɹə.ˈfɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that –

Professional
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination combines with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /prə-FEH-shih-nəl//pɹə.ˈfɛ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Professionalism
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination combines with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /prə-FEH-shih-nəl-ih-zəm//pɹə.ˈfɛ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Professor
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-FEH-s’r//pɹə.ˈfɛ.sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Proficiency
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/prə-FIH-shihn-see/ – /pɹə.ˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Proficient
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/prə-FIH-shihn[t]/ – /pɹə.ˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Proficiently
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-FIH-shihn[t]-lee//pɹə.ˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Profile
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/PROH-fai-y’l//ˈpɹo.faiː.jl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Profit
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /PRAH-fih[t]//ˈpɹɑ.fə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Profitable
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAH-fih-duh-bəl//ˈpɹɑ.fə(ɪ).də(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Profitability
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final”y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prah-fih-duh-BIH-lih-dee/ – /pɹɑ.fɪ.də(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable –

Program
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “g” is hard, and the “a” is short

/PROH-græm/ –/ˈpɹo.gɹæm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Progress (noun)
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “g” is hard, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /PRAH-grehs//ˈpɹɑ.gɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Progress (verb)
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /prə-GREHS//pɹə.ˈgɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Prohibit
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /proh-HIH-bih-[t]//pɹo.ˈhɪ.bə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Prohibited
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “h” is pronounced, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” (sometimes) turns into a flap-t, and since the root word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /proh-HIH-bih-dih[d]//pɹo.ˈhɪ.bɪ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Prohibition
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “h” is almost silent, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pro-[h]ə-BIH-shihn//ˌpɹo.[h]əˈbɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the major stress is on the third syllable and that there is a minor stress on the first syllable –

Project (noun)
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/PRAH-dʒeh[k]-t//ˈpɹɑ.dʒɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Project (verb)
– For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /prə-dʒE[K]-t//pɹə.dʒɛ[k]-t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Projects
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/PRAH-dʒeh[k]-ts//ˈpɹɑ.dʒɛ[k].ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Projector
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-dʒEH[K]-t’r//pɹə.ˈdʒɛ[k].tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Projectors
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/prə-dʒEH[K]-t’r-z//pɹə.ˈdʒɛ[k].tɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Prolific
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /proh-LIH-fihk//pɹo.ˈlɪ.fɪk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Prominent
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAH-mih-nihn-[t]//ˈpɹɑ.mə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “t” (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Promise
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/PRAH-mihs//ˈpɹɑ.mə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Promising
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAH-mih-sing//ˈpɹɑ.mə(ɪ).sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Promote
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/prə-MOH[T]//pɹə.ˈmo[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Promoted
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/prə-MOH-dih[d]/ – /pɹə.ˈmo.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Promotion
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prə-MOH-shihn//pɹə.ˈmo.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Promotions
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), then the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/prə-MOH-shihn-z//pɹə.ˈmo.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Prompt
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/prahm-[p][t]//pɹɑm.[p][t]/ – Notice also that the “pt” combination (regardless of which is stopped) acts as a second syllable

Promptly
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the “t” is (sometimes) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAHM-[p][t]-lee//ˈpɹɑm.[p][t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pronoun
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination

– /PROH-nown//ˈpɹo.naun/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pronounce
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent

– /prə-NOWN-s//pɹə.naun.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Pronunciation
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is a short, the “c” is soft, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prə-nuhn-see-AY-shihn/ – /prə.ˌnʌn.siː.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress is on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Proof
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/proof//pɹuf/

Propaganda
 – For this word, the first “o” is short, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the second “a” is short, and the third “a” turns into a u-schwa

/prah-puh-GæN-duh//prɑ.pə(ʌ).ˈgæn.də(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Proper
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAH-p’r/ – /ˈpɹɑ.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Properly
 – For this word, the “o” is short, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAH-p’r-lee//ˈpɹɑ.pɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Property
 – For this word, the first “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PRAH-p’r-dee//ˈpɹɑ.pɚ.ɾi ː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Proportion
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prə-POHR-shihn//pɹə.ˈpoɹ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Proposal
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə.POH-zəl//pɹə.ˈpo.zəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Propose
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/prə-POHZ//pɹə.ˈpoz / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Proposed
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /prə-POHZ-[D]//pɹə.ˈpoz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Prospect
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PRAHS-peh[k]-[t]//ˈpɹɑs.pɛ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Prospective
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-SPEHK-dihv//pɹə.spɛk.də(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Prosperity
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prahs-PAYR-ih-dee/ – /pɹɑs.peɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Prosperous
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PRAHS-p’r-ihs//ˈpɹɑs.pɚ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Protect
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/prə-TEH[K]-t//pɹə.ˈtɛ[k].t / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Protection
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/prə-TEH[K]-shihn//pɹə.ˈtɛ[k].ʃə(ɪ)n / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Protest
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PROH-tehs[t]//ˈpɹo.tɛs[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Protocol
 – For this word, the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the third “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination

/PROH-də.kawl//ˈpɹo.ɾə.kɔl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Prototype
 – For this word, the first “o” is long, the first “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” is long, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/PROH-doh-tigh[p]//ˈpɹo.ɾo.tʌiː[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Protruding
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-CHROO-ding//pɹə.ˈtʃɹu.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Proud
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/prow[d]//pɹɑu[ɾ]/ –

Proudest
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PROW-dihs-[t]/ – /ˈpɹau.ɾə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when it is not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Proudly
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PROW-[d]-lee//ˈpɹau.[ɾ].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Prove
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/proov//pɹuv/ –

Proved
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and since the root word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/proov[d]//pɹuv.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Proven
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “e” turns into an i-schwa

/PROO-vihn//ˈpɹu.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Provide
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “e” is silent

/prə-VAI[D]//pɹə.ˈvaiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Provided
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/prə-VAI-dih[d]//pɹə.ˈvaiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ] / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Providing
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-VAI-ding//pɹə.ˈvaiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Provision
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prə-VIH-zhihn//pɹə.ˈvɪ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Provisions
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/prə-VIH-zhihn-z//pɹə.ˈvɪ.ʒə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable  –

Provocative
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” (usually) is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pruh-VAH-kuh-dihv/ – /pɹə(ʌ).ˈvɑ.kə(ʌ).ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Proximity
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/prahk-SIH-mih-dee//pɹɑkˈsɪ.mə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Proxy
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /PRAHK-see//ˈpɹɑk.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Prudent
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PROO-dihn[t]//ˈpru.ɾə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pry
– For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/prai//pɹaiː/

Ps

Psychiatrist
 – For this word, the “P” is silent, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “i” is long, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the last “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /sai-KAI-uh-chrihs-[t]//saiː.ˈkaiː.ə(ʌ).tʃɹə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Psychological
 – For this word, the “P” is silent, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “o”turns into a u-schwa, the second “o”is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /sigh-kuh-LAH-dʒih-kəl/ – /sʌiː.kə(ʌ).lɑ.dʒə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Psychologist
 – For this word, the “P” is silent, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sai-KAH-luh-dʒɪs-[t]//saiː.ˈkɑ.lə(ʌ).dʒɪs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Psychology
 – For this word, the “P” is silent, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is soft, the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/sai-KAH-luh-dʒee//saiː.ˈkɑ.lə(ʌ).dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Psychopaths
 – For this word, the “P” is silent, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “o” is long, the “a” is short, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/SIGH-koh-pæ-ths//ˈsʌiː.ko.pæ.θs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pu

Pub
– For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “b” is (sometimes) stopped

/puh[b]//pʌ[b]/

Public
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /PUHB-lih[k]//ˈpʌb.lɪ[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Publication
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/puh-blih-KAY-shihn//ˌpʌ.blə(ɪ).ˈkeiː.shə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Publicity
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final”y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /puh-BLIH-sih-dee//pə(ʌ).ˈblɪ.sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Publicizing
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PUH-blih-sai-zing//ˈpʌ.blə(ɪ).saiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Publicly
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is and i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PUH-blihk-lee//ˈpʌ.blə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Publish
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/PUH-blihsh//ˈpʌ.blə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Publishing
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PUH-blih-shing//ˈpʌ.blə(ɪ).ʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Published
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and since the root-word ends with the “sh” sound – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /PUH-blihsh-[t]//ˈpʌb.lə(ɪ)ʃ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Puffiness
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PUH-fee-nis//ˈpʌ.fiː.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pull
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pəl//pəl/

Pulled
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l”, the “e” of the “”-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /pəl[d]/ – /pəl[d]/ –

Pulling
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-ling/ – /ˈpə.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pulmonary
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PəL-muh-nayr-ee//ˈpəl.mə(ʌ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pulse
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/puhl-s//pʌl.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pulses
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PUHL-sihz//ˈpʌl.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pulverize
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PUHL-v’r-aiz//ˈpə(ʌ)l.vɚ.aiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pulverized
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” disappears,for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the “e” combines with the “ed” ending (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /PUHL-v’r-aiz-[d]//ˈpə(ʌ)l.vɚ.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Pump
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the second “p” is (often) stopped

/puhm-[p]//ˈpʌm.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Pumped
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the second “p” is stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/PUHM[P]-t//ˈpʌm[p].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Punch
 – For this word, the “u” is short

/puhn-ch//pʌn.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Punched
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “ch” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/PUHN-ch-t//ˈpʌn.tʃ.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Punctual
 – For this word, the first “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the sound of the hard letter “c” directly after it), the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PUHNG[K]-choo-əl//ˈpʌŋ[k].tʃu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pundits
– For this word, the “u” is short, and the “i” is short

/PUHN-dih-ts//ˈpʌn.dɪ.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” combination acts as a separate syllable

Punish
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/PUH-nihsh//ˈpʌ.nə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Punishment
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PUH-nish-mihn[t]//ˈpʌ.nə(ɪ)ʃ.mə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pupil
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “i” turns into a true-schwa

/PYOO-pəl//ˈpju.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Puppy
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply as a single letter “p”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PUH-pee/ – /ˈpʌ.piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Purchase
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/P’R-chihs//ˈpɚ.tʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Purchasing
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the “-ing” ending is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/P’R-chih-sing//ˈpɚ.tʃə(ɪ).sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pure
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “e” is silent

/pyoor//pjuɹ/

Purely
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PYOOR-lee//ˈpjuɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Purer
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, there is a phantom letter “r” in-between the first “r” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next) and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PYOUR-rər/ – /ˈpjuɹ.ɹɚ/ – Notice also  that the stress is on the first syllable –

Purify
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

– /PYOU-rih-fai//ˈpjuɹ.ɪ.faiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Purified
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “i”, and the final “d” is a flap-d

– /PYOU-rih-fai[d]//ˈpjuɹ.ɪ.faiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Purity
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final”y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PYOU-rih-dee//ˈpjuɹ.ə(ɪ)ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Purple
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/P’R-pəl//ˈpɚ.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Purpose
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the “e” is silent

– /P’R-pihs//ˈpəɹ.pə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Purposes
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /P’R-pihs-ihz/ – /ˈpəɹ.pə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Purse
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/p’rs/ – /pɚs/ –

Pursue
 – For this word, the first “u” disappears, and the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/p’r-SOO/ – /pɚ.ˈsu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Pursuing
 – For this word, the first “u” disappears, the second “u” is long, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “u” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-SOO-wing/ – /pɚ.ˈsu.wɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Push
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “book” or “foot”), and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/pəihsh//pəɪʃ/

Pushed
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “book” or “foot”), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “sh” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/pəihsh-[t]/ – /pəɪʃ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Pushy
 – For this word, the “u” is pronounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “book” or “foot”), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PəIH-shee//ˈpəɪ.ʃiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Put
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “book” or “foott”), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pəih[t]/ – /pəɪ[t]/ –

Puzzle
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “zz” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “z” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /PUH-zəl//ˈpʌ.zəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Puzzled
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “zz” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “z” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /PUH-zəl[d]//ˈpʌ.zəl[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Puzzles
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “zz” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “z” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /PUH-zəl-z//ˈpʌ.zəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Py

Pyramid
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/PEER-uh-mih[d]//ˈpiːɹ.ə(ʌ).mə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter P ) –


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