– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter P ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Pp

 

Pe . Ph . Pi . Pl . Pm – Pz

 

Pace
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/pays/ – /peiːs/ –

Pack
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pæk/ – /pæk/ –

Package
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” is pronounced like the letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PæK-ih-dʒ//ˈpæk.ə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable –

Packaging
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PæK-ih.dʒing//ˈpæk.ə(ɪ).dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Packet
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/-kih[t]/ – /ˈpæ.kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Page
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /pay-dʒ/ – /peiː.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable –

Pageantry
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the “ea” combination turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /-dʒən-chree/ – /ˈpæ.dʒə(i)n.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pain
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/payn/ – /peiːn/ –

Painful (Pain-full)
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAYN-fəl/ – /ˈpeiːn.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Paint
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/payn[t]/ – /peiːn[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Paints
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/payn-ts/ – /peiːn.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Painter
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAYN-t’r/ – /ˈpeiːn.tɚ/ –the stress is on the first syllable –

Painting
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), , and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAYN-ting/ – /ˈpeiːn.tɪŋ/ –the stress is on the first syllable –

Pair
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/payr/ – /peɪɹ/ –

Palace
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/-lihs//ˈpæ.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Palaces
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /-lih-sihz/ – /ˈpæ.lə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Palazzo
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “zz” combination is pronounced like a “ts” combination, and the final “o” is long

/pə-LAH-tsoh//pə.ˈlɑ.tso/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Pale
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/payl//peɪl/

Pan
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/pæn//pæn/

Panel
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/-nəl//ˈPæ.nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pants
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/pæn-ts//pæn.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Paper
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/PAY-p’r/ – /ˈpeiː.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Parachute
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is a u-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “u” is long, the “t” is stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/PAYR-uh-shoo[t]//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).ʃu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Parachuting
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is a u-schwa, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “u” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAYR-uh-shoo-ding//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).ʃu.ɾɪŋ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Paradigm
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, and the “g” is silent

/PAYR-uh-daim//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).daiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Paradox
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “o” is short, and the final “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/PAYR-uh-dah-ks//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).dɑ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Paragraph (para-Graph)
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the third “a” is short, and the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PAYR-uh-græf//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).gɹæf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Paraguay
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the letter “w”, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PAYR-uh-gwai//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).gwaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Parallel
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” is short

– /PAYR-uh-lehl//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).lɛl/ – Notice that the stress is on the first syllable –

Parameter (para-Meter)
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, and for the “-meter” suffix – the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the last “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /pə--mih-d’r//pə.ˈɹæ.mə(ɪ).ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Parameters (para-Meters)
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, for the “-meter” suffix – the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the last “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /pə--mih-d’r-z//pə.ˈɹæ.mə(ɪ).ɾɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Parameterization (para-Meter-ize-ation)
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “a” is short, for the “-meter” suffix – the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the last “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, the third “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /pə--mih-d’r-ai-ZAY-shuhn//pə.ˌɹæ.mə(ɪ).ɾɚ.aiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and the major stress is on the sixth syllable –

Paraplegic
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “a” is a u-schwa, the “e” is long, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/payr-uh-PLEE-dʒih[k]//ˌpeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).ˈpliː.dʒə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Parent
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PAYR-ihn[t]/ – /ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Parental
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is short, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/puh-REHN-təl/ – /pə(ʌ).ɹˈɛn.təl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Parents
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/PAYR-ihn-ts/ – /ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Park
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/pahr-[k]/ – /pɑɹ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts like a second syllable and that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Parked
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/pahr-[k]-t/ – /pɑɹ-[k].t/ – Notice that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Parliament
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “ia” combination turns into an true-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /PAHR-lə-mihn-[t]//ˈpɑɹ.lə.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Part
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/pahr-[t]/ – /pɑɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Partake
 – For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/pahr-TAY[K]//pɑɹ.ˈteiː[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Partaking
 – For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pahr-TAY-king//pɑɹ.ˈteiː.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Participant
 – For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is often (stopped)

/pahr-TIH-sih-pihn-[t]//pɑɹ.ˈtɪ.sə(ɪ).pə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Participants
 – For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/pahr-TIH-sih-pihn-ts//pɑɹ.ˈtɪ.sə(ɪ).pə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Participle
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” a flap-t, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa between the “p” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

– /PAHR-dih-sih-pəl/ – /ˈpɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ).sə(ɪ),pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Particular
 – For this word, the “a” disappears, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the last “a” disappears

– /p’r-TIHK-yoo-l’r//pɚ.ˈtɪk.ju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Particularly
 – For this word, the “a” disappears, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the second “a” disappears, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /p’r-TIHK-yoo-l’r-lee//pɚ.tɪk.ju.lɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Partly
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAHR-[t]-lee/ – /ˈpɑɹ.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Partner
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAHR[T]-n’r//ˈpɑɹ[t].nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Partnership
 – For this word, For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ship” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAHR[T]-n’r-shih[p]/ – /ˈpɑɹ[t].nɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Parts
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/pahr-ts/ – /pɑɹ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Party
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /PAHR-dee//ˈpɑɹ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pass
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/pæs//pæs/

Passage
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-sih-dʒ//ˈpæ.sə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Passe
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/pæ-SAY//pæ.ˈseiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Passed
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” is silent, and the “d” ending sounds like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /pæs-t//pæs.t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Passenger
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” ending is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-sihn-dʒɚ//ˈpæ.sə(ɪ)n.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Passing
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-sing//ˈpæ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Passion
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a true-schwa

– /-shən//ˈpæ.ʃən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Passionate
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “io” combination turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-shih-nih[t]//ˈpæ.ʃə(ɪ)nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Passport (Pass-Port)
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PæS-pohr[t]//ˈpæs.poɹ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Past
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/pæs[t]//pæs[t]/

Pasta
 – For this word, the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/PAHS-tuh//ˈpɑs.tə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Paste
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/PAYS-[t]//ˈpeiːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Pastries
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /PAYS-chreez/ – /ˈpeiːs.tʃɹiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pasture
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “e” is silent

/PæS-ch’r/ – /pæs.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pastures
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PæS-ch’r-z/ – /pæs.tʃɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Patch
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/-ch/ – /ˈpæ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ch” combination acts as a separate syllable –

Patches
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/-chihz/ – /ˈpæ.tʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Patent
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent, and the final “t” is also (usually) stopped

– /-[t]n[t]//ˈpæ.[t]ən[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Patented
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /-[t]n-tih[d]//ˈpæ.[t]ən.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Path
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/pæth//pæð/

Patience
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-scwha, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /PAY-shihn-s//ˈpeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Patient
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “t” is (often) stopped

– /PAY-shihn[t]//ˈpeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Patients
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

– /PAY-shihn-ts//ˈpeɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Patio
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “o” is long

/-dee-oh/ – /ˈpæ.ɾiː.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Patriarchal
 – For this word, the first “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /pay-chree-AHR-kəl/ – /peiː.tʃɹiː.ˈɑɹ.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Patricia
 – For this name, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /puh-CHRIH-shuh//pə(ʌ).ˈtʃɹɪ.ʃə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Patriot
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PAY-chree-ih[t]/ – /ˈpeiː.tʃɹiː.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Patriotic
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard

/pay-chree-AH-dihk/ – /peiː.tʃɹiː.ˈɑ.ɾə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Patriotism (Patriot-ism)
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAY-chree-uh-tih-zəm/ – /ˈpeiː.tʃɹiː.ə(ʌ).tɪ.zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Patron
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /PAY-chrihn//ˈpeiː.tʃɹə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pattern
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

– /-d’rn//ˈpæ.ɾɚn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pause
– For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/pawz//pɔz/

Pavilion
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the second “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/puh-VIHL-ee-yihn//pə(ʌ).ˈvɪl.iː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Pavilions
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the second “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/puh-VIHL-ee-yihn-z//pə(ʌ).ˈvɪl.iː.jə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Pay
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pay//peiː/

Payment (Pay-ment)
– For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PAY-mihn-[t]//ˈpeiː.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pe

Peace
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/pees//piːs/

Peaceful (Peace-full)
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PEES-fəl//ˈpiːs.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Peak
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/pee[k]/ – /piː[k]/ –

Pear
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/payr//peɪɹ/

Peasant
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PEH-zihn-[t]//ˈpɛ.zihn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Peasantry
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PEH-zihn-chree//ˈpɛ.zihn.tʃɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pebble
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PEH-bəl//ˈpɛ.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pebbles
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PEH-bəl-z//ˈpɛ.bəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pecan
 – For this word, (though many people, especially in Great Britain and the southern United States pronounce this with the short “a” – in The Common Tongue...) the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/pee.kahn//piː.kɑn/ – Notice also that there is no discernible major stress, it can be equally on both, or either of the two –

Peculiar
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a”, and the “a” disappears

/pə-KYOO-lee-y’r//pə.ˈkju.liː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Peculiarities
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is pronounced like The Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/pə-kyoo-lee-AYR-ih-deez//pə.ˌkju.liː.ˈeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the main stress is on the fourth syllable

Pedestrians
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/pə-DEHS-chree-ihn-z//pə.ˈdɛs.tʃɹiː.ə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Pedigree
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PEH-dih-gree/ – /ˈpɛ.ɾə(ɪ).gɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Peel
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and there is a phantom consonant letter “y” and a phantom-schwa in-between the second “e” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

– /PEE-yəl/ – /ˈpiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pen
– For this word, the “e” is short

/pehn//pɛn/

Pens
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/pehn-z//pɛn.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending is acts as a separate syllable

Pence
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /pehn-s//pɛn.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable –

Pencil
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “i” disappears

/pehn-sl//ˈpɛn.sl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pendulum
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the first “u” turns into a true-schwa, the second “u” is a u-schwa

/PEHN-dʒə-luhm/ – /ˈpɛn.dʒə.lə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Penny
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PEH-nee//ˈpɛ.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pension
 – For this word, the “e” is short, for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PEHN-shihn/ – /ˈpɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pensioner
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PEHN-shihn-‘r/ – /ˈpɛn.ʃə(ɪ)n.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

People
 – For this word, the “eo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /PEE-pəl//ˈpiː.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pepper
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PEH-p’r//ˈpɛ.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Percent
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/p’r-SEHN-[t]/ – /pɚ.ˈsɛn[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Percentage
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-SEHN-tih-dʒ/ – /pɚ.ˈsɛn.tə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Percentile
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ile” suffix – the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is the product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-SEHN-tail/ – /pɚ.ˈsɛn.taiːl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Perceptive
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the second “p” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-SEH[P]-tihv//pɚ.ˈsɛ[p].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Perfect (adjective)
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/P’R-fih[ct]//ˈpɚ.fə(ɪ)[kt]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Perfect (verb)
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/p’r-FEH[KT]//pɚ.ˈfɛ[kt]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Perfectionist (Perfect-tion-ist)
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /p’r-FEHK-shihn-ihs-[t]//pɚ.ˈfɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n.ɪs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Perfectly
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the final “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/P’R-fih[kt]-lee//ˈpɚ.fə(ɪ)[kt]-lee/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Perform
– For this word, the “e” disappears, and the “o” is long

/p’r-FOHR-m//pɚ.ˈfoɹ.m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “m” ending acts as a second syllable

Performance
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, the “o” is long, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /p’r-FOHR-mihn-s//pɚɹ.ˈfoɹ.mə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Performances
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “o” is long, for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the joins with the “-es” ending and so turns into an i-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /p’r-FOHR-mihn-sihz//pɚ.foɹ.mə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Performer
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “o” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-FOHR-m’r//pɚ.ˈfoɹ.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Perfume
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you” and the final “e” is silent

– /p’r-FYOUM//pɚ.ˈfjum/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Perhaps
– For this word, the “e” disappears, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is short, and the “p” is (often) stopped

/p’r-HæP-s//pɚ.ˈhæp.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Period
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /PEE-ree-ih[d]//ˈpiːɹ.iː.ə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Periodically
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /peer-ee-AH-dih[k]-lee//piːɹ.iː.ˈɑ.ɾɪ[k].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable –

Peripheral
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “i” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard
pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-IH-f’r-əl//pɚ.ˈɪ.fɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Perishes
 – For this word, the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and the “e” of the “-es” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/PAYR-ih-shihz//ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Perks
 – For this word, the “e” disappears

/p’r-ks//pɚ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

Permanent
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/P’R-mə-nihn-[t]//ˈpɚ.mə.nə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Permission
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the first “i” is short, the first “s” joins with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-MIH-shihn//pɚ.ˈmɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Permit (noun)
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/P’R-mih[t]//ˈpɚ.mə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Permit (verb)
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/p’r-MIH[T]//pɚ.ˈmɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Perpetrator
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “o” disappears

/P’R-pə-chray-d’r//ˈpɚ.pə.tʃɹeiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Perpetrators
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “o” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/P’R-pə-chray-d’rz//ˈpɚ.pə.tʃɹeiː.ɾɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Persevere
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” turns into a u-schwa, the third “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/p’r-suh-VEER//pɚ.sə(ʌ).ˈviːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Persistent
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “i” is short, ə ( ɪ )n[t] – , and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-SIHS-tihn-[t]//pɚ.ˈsɪs.tə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

Person
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, and the “o” turns into a true-schwa

/P’R-sən//ˈpɚ.sən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Personal
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, the “o” turns into a true-schwa,  and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /P’R-sə-nəl//ˈpɚ.sən.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Personality
– For this word, the “e” disappears, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-sən-æ-lih-dee//pɚ.sən.ˈæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that –

Personally
– For this word, the “e” disappears, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/P’R-sən-ə-lee//ˈpɚ.sən.ə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Personnel
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” is short

– /p’r-sən-EHL/ – /pɚ.sən.ˈɛl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Perspective
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but it is (often) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /p’r-SPEHK-tihv//pɚ.ˈspɛk.də(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Persuade
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “su” combination is pronounced like an “sw” combination, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /p’r-SWAY[D]//pɚ.ˈsweiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Persuaded
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “su” combination is pronounced like an “sw” combination, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /p’r-SWAY-dih[d]/ – /pɚ.ˈsweiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Persuading
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, the “su” combination is pronounced like an “sw” combination, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /p’r-SWAY-ding//pɚ.ˈsweiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Persuasion
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, the “su” combination is pronounced like an “sw” combination, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced version of the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/p’r-SWAY-zhihn/ – /pɚ.ˈsweiː.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Persuasive
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, the “su” combination is pronounced like an “sw” combination, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /p’r-SWAY-sihv//pɚ.ˈsweiː.sə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Peru
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced like a True Long “A”, the “r” is a single “rolled” r (which sounds exactly like the flad-d or flap-t) and the “u” is long (This is NOT the standard pronunciation of this country-name in English, but one of the main principles of The Common Tongue is that – names of people, places, and things  – from other countries and cultures should be pronounced as closely to the way the natives of that culture pronounce it.)

– /pay-ROO/ – /pe.ˈɾu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Peruvian
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced likea True Long “A”, the “r” is a single “rolled” r (which sounds exactly like the flad-d or flap-t) and the “u” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (This is NOT the standard pronunciation of this country-name in English, but one of the main principles of The Common Tongue is that – names of people, places, and things  – from other countries and cultures should be pronounced as closely to the way the natives of that culture pronounce it.)

– /pay-ROO/ – /pe.ˈɾu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Pessimism
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” turns into an -i-schwa, and for the “-ism” suffix – and the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounce almost like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PEH-sə-mih-zəm//ˈpɛ.sə.mə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Pessimist
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix – and the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PEH-sə-muhs-[t]//ˈpɛ.sə.mə(ʌ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Pet
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/peh[t]//pɛ[t]/ – Notice also that –

Petrol
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “o” is long

/PEH-chrohl//ˈpɛ.tʃɹol/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Petroleum
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is long, the second “e” is long, and the “u” turns into a u-schwa

– /pih-TROH-lee-uhm//pə(ɪ).ˈtʃɹo.liː.ə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ph

Pharmaceutical
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” turns into a i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “eu” is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /fahrm-ih-SOO-dih-k’l//fɑɹ.mə(ɪ).ˈsu.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Pharmaceuticals
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “a” turns into a i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “eu” is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), And the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

– /fahrm-ih-SOO-dih-k’l-z//fɑɹ.mə(ɪ).ˈsu.ɾə(ɪ).kəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Phase
 – For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/fayz//feiːz/

Philippines
 – For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the third “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/FIH-lih-PEEN-z//ˈfɪ.lɪ.ˈpiːn.z/ – Notice also that the major stress can be on either the first or the third syllable but is not used on both; only one-or-the-other –

Philosophy
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-osophy” suffix – the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/fih-LAH-sə-fee//fə(ɪ).ˈlɑ.sə.fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Phobia
 – For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

/FOH-bee-uh//ˈfo.biː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Phone
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/fohn//fon/

Phoneme
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the first “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/FOH-neem//ˈfo.niːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Photo
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” is long

/FOH-doh//ˈfo.ɾo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Photocopier
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the third “o” is short, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and there is a phantom consonant letter “y” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/FOH-doh-kah-pee-y’r//ˈfo.ɾo.kɑ.piː.jɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Photocopy (photo-Copy)
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the third “o” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/FOH-doh-kah-pee//ˈfo.ɾo.kɑ.piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Photograph (photo-Graph)
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is short, and the final the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/FOH-də-græf//ˈfo.ɾə.ɡɹæf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Photographer (photo-Graph-er)
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into an u-schwa, the second “ph” combination also is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /fə-TAH-grə(ʌ)-f’r/ – /fə.ˈtɑ.ɡɹə(ʌ).fɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Photographers (photo-Graph-ers)
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into an u-schwa, the second “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/fə-TAH-grə(ʌ)-f’r-z/ – /fə.ˈtɑ.ɡɹə(ʌ).fɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Photographic (photo-Graph-ic)
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), , and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/foh-duh-GRæ-fihk/ – /fo.ɾə(ʌ).ˈgæ.fə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Photographing (photo-Graph-ing)
– For this word, the “ph” combination sounds like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is short, the “ph” combination sounds like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /FOH-duh-græ-fing/ – /ˈfo.ɾə(ʌ).gɹæ.fɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Photography (photo-Graph-y)
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “o” disappears, the second “o” is short, the “g” is hard, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /f’-TAH-gruh-fee//fə.ˈtɑ.gɹə(ʌ).fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Phrase
 – For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/frayz/ – /fɹeiːz/ –

Phrases
 – For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the first “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

– /FRAY-zihz//ˈfɹeiː.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Physical
 – For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FIH-zih-kəl//ˈfɪ.zə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Physically
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is one of two standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FIH-zihk-lee//ˈfɪ.zə(ɪ)k.li ː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Physician
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “y” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/fə-ZIH-shihn//fə.ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Physics
– For this word, the “Ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/FIH-zih-ks//ˈfɪ.zə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable –

Pi

Pianist
 – For this word, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PEE-uh-nih-s[t]/ – /ˈpiː.ə(ʌ).nɪ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Piano
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is short, and the final “o” is long

– /pee-æ-noh//piː.ˈæ.no/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Pick
– For this word, “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pihk//pɪk/ – Notice also that –

Picked
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) however, in this word it is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/pih[k]-t//pɪ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Picnic
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the second “i” is short, and the final “c” is hard

/PIH[K]-nihk/ – /ˈpɪ[k].nɪk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Picture
– For this word, “i” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PIHK-ch’r//ˈpɪk.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Picturesque (Picture-esque)
– For this word, “i” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the “e” combines with the “-esque” suffix, and for the “-esque” suffix – the “e” is short, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k” but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/pihk-ch’r-EHS-[k]//pɪk.tʃɚ.ˈɛs.[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Pie
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the singlelong letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /pai//paiː/

Piece
– For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/pees//piːs/ – Notice also that –

Pieces
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “c” is soft, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/PEE-sihz/ – /ˈpiː.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pier
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/peer//piːɹ/

Pig
– For this word, “i” is short, and the “g” is hard

/pihg//pɪg/ – Notice also that –

Pile
– For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/PAI-y’l//ˈpaiː.jl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Piles
 – For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /PAI-yl’z//ˈpaiː.jlz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pilgrimage
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “g” is hard, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PIHL-grih-mihdʒ//ˈpɪl.gɹə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pill
– For this word, “i” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pihl//pɪl/

Pilot
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PAI-lih[t]//ˈpaiː.lə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Piloting
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PAI-lih-ting//ˈpaiː.lə(ɪ).ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pin
– For this word, “i” is short

/pihn//pɪn/ – Notice also that –

Pine
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/pain//paiːn/ – Notice also that there is no discernible word-stress –

Pineapple
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

– /PAI-næ-pəl//ˈpaiː.næ.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pink
– For this word, “i” is short, and the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/ping-k//pɪŋ.k / – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Pint
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/pighn-[t]/ – /pɑ(ʌ)iːn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Pipe
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/pighp//ˈpʌiːp/

Piracy
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /PIGH-ruh-see//ˈpʌiː.rə(ʌ).siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pissy
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PIH-see//ˈpɪ.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pistachio
 – For this word, the first “i” disappears, the “a” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “o” is long

– /pih-STæ-shee-oh//pɪ.stæ.ʃiː.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Pitch
– For this word, “i” is short, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/pih-ch//pɪ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Pitfall
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/PIH[T]-fawl//ˈpɪ[t].fɔl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Pity
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /PIH-dee//ˈpɪ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pivot
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

– /PIH-vih[t]//ˈpɪ.vɪ[t]/ –  Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Pizza
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “zz” combination is pronounced like a “ts” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/PEE-tsuh//ˈpiː.tʃə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fist syllable

Pl

Place
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/plays//pleiːs/

Placed
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the soft letter “c” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/PLAYS-[t]//ˈpleiːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Place-Mat
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, the “e” is silent, the second “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PLAYS-mæ[t]//ˈpleiːs.mæ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Plain
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/playn//pleiːn/

Plan
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/plæn//plæn/

Plane
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/playn//pleiːn/

Planet
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PLæ-nih[t]//ˈplæ.nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Planned
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /plæn-d//plæn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable –

Planning
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PLæ-ning//ˈplæ.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plant
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/plæn-[t]//ˈplæn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Plastic
– For this word, the “a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PLæ-stih[k]//ˈplæ.stə(ɪ)[k] / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plate
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/play'[t]/ – /pleiː[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Platform
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the “o” is long

/PLæ[T].fohr-m//ˈplæ[t].foɹ.m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “m” ending acts as a third syllable –

Play
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/play//pleiː/

Player
– For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition between one sound and the next), and the “e” disappears

/PLAY-y’r//ˈpleiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plays
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like The Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/play-z//pleiː.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

Pleasant
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PLEH-zihn-[t]//ˈplɛ.zə(ɪ)n.[t]/Notice also that the the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Please
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/pleez/ – /pliːz/ –

Pleased
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/pleez-[d]/ – /pliːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Pleasure
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the short letter “e”, and for the “-sure” suffix – the “s” is pronounced like voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PLEH-zh’r//ˈplɛ.ʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plenty
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/PLEN-tee//ˈplɛn.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plot
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/plah[t]//plɑ[t]/

Plug
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “g” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /pluh[g]//plʌ[g]/

Plumber
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is silent, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /PLUHM-‘r//ˈplʌm.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plummet
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/PUH-mih[t]//ˈplʌ.mə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plummeted
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d (often) stopped

/PUH-mih-tih[d]//ˈplʌ.mə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plunge
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /pluhn-dʒ//plʌn.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable –

Plunging
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced normally (the placement of the letter “g” directly after it does not affect the pronunciation), the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing”, or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PLUHN-dʒing//ˈplʌn.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Plural
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/PL’R-əl//ˈplɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Plus
 – For this word, the “u” is short

– /pluhs/ – /plʌs/ –

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter P ) –


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