– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter R:  Rec ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Rec

 

Ra . Rea . Reb . Red . Ref . Reg . Reh . Rej . Rel . Rem . Ren . Rep . Req . Res . Ret . Reu . Rev . Rew . Rh . Ri . Ro . Ru . Ry

 

Recall (noun) (re-Call)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/REE-kawl//ˈɹiː.kɔl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Recall (verb) (re-Call)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ree-KAWL//ɹiː.ˈkɔl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Receipt
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “p” is silent, and the “t” is (often) stopped

/rə-SEE[T]//rə.siː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Receive
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/rə-SEEV//ɹə.ˈsiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Received
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/rə-SEEV-[d]//ɹə.ˈsiːv.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Recent
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is
(often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REE-sihn-[t]//ˈɹiː.sə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Recently
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REE-sihn[t]-lee//ˈɹiː.sə(ɪ)n[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Receptacle
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/rə-SEH[P]-tih.kəl//ɹə.ˈsɛ[p].tə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Reception
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-SEH[P]-shihn//ɹə.ˈsɛ[p].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Receptionist
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ist” suffix – and the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-SEH[P]-shihn-ihs[t]//ɹə.ˈsɛ[p].ʃə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Recession
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/rə-SEH-shihn//ɹə.ˈsɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Recharge (re-Charge)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ree-CHAHR-dʒ//ɹiː.ˈtʃɑɹ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Rechargeable (re-Charge-able)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ree-CHAHR-dʒuh-bəl//ɹiː.ˈtʃɑɹ.dʒə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Recipe
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is long

/REH-sih-pee//ˈɹɛ.sə(ɪ).piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Recipes
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/REH-sih-peez//ˈɹɛ.sə(ɪ).piːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Reckon
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/REH-kihn//ˈɹɛ.kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Reckoned
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/REH-kihn-[d]//ˈɹɛ.kə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Reclaim
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/ree-KLAYM//ɹiː.ˈkleiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Recluse
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/REH-kloos//ˈɹɛ.klus/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Recognition (re-Cognition)
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “first “i” is short, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-ku[g]-NIH-shihn//ɹɛ.kə(ʌ)[g].ˈnɪ.ʃə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Recognize (re-Cognize)
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/REH-kih[g]-naiz//ˈɹɛ.kə(ɪ)[g].naiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Recognized (re-Cognized)
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/REH-kih[g]-naiz-[d]//ˈɹɛ.kə(ɪ)[g].naiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Recommend (re-Commend)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/reh-kə-MEHN-[d]//ˌɹɛ.kəˈmɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Recommendable (re-Commend-able)
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-kuh-MEHN-duh-bəl//ɹɛ.kə(ʌ).ˈmɛn.də(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Recommendation (re-Commend-ation)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-kə-mehn-DAY-shihn//ˌɹɛ.kə.mɛn.ˈdeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the first syllable

 

Recommendations (re-Commend-ations)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/reh-kə-mehn-DAY-shihn-z//ˌɹɛ.kə.mɛn.ˈdeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, the major stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a sixth syllable

 

Reconcile
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “c” is hard, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/REH-kihn-sail//ˈɹɛ.kə(ɪ)n.saiːl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Reconciliation
– For this word, the “e” is short, the first “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the first “i” is a short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-kən-sih-lee-AY-shihn//ɹɛ.kən.sɪ.liː.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fifth syllable

 

Reconsider (re-Consider)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and the second “e” disappears

/ree-kuhn-SIH-d’r//ɹiː.kə(ʌ)n.ˈsɪ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Reconstruct (re-Construct)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the second “c” is hard, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ree-kən-SCHRUHK-[t]//ˌɹiː.kən.ˈstʃɹʌk.[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Reconstruction (re-Construct-tion)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ree-kən-SCHRUHK-shihn//ˌɹiː.kən.ˈstʃɹʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Record (noun)
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” disappears, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/REH-k’r-[d]//ˈɹɛ.kɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Record (verb)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/rə-KOHR-[d]//ɹə.ˈkoɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Records
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” disappears, the “d” is is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/REH-k’r-[d]z//ˈɹɛ.kɚ.[d]z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ds” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Recording
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-KOHR-ding//ɹə.ˈkoɹ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Recordings
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/rə-KOHR-ding-z//ɹə.ˈkoɹ.ɾɪŋ.z/ – Noticed also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Recover (re-Cover)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “e” disappears

/rə-KUH-v’r//ɹə.ˈkʌ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Recovery (re-Cover-y)
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the second “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/rə-KUH-v’r-ee//ɹə.ˈkʌ.vɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Recruit
– For this word, the “e” turns into a trues-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/rə-KROO[T]//ɹə.ˈkɹu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Recruiters
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/rə-KROO-d’rz//ɹə.ˈkɹu.ɾɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Recruiting
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-KROO-ding//ɹə.ˈkɹu.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Recruitment
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-KROO[T]-mihn-[t]//ɹə.ˈkɹu[t].mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Rectangle
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, and the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “ng” combination), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “g” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/REH[K]-tæng-gəl//ˈɹɛ[k].tæŋ.gəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Rectangular
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, and the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “ng” combination), the “u” is pronounce like the pronoun “you”, and the second “a” disappears

/reh[k]-TæNG-gyoo-l’r//rɛ[k].ˈtæŋ.gju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Recuperate
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ree-KOO-p’r-ay[t]//ɹiː.ˈku.pɚ.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Recycle (re-Cycle)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the first “c” is soft, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the second “c” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/ree-SIGH-kəl//ɹiː.ˈsʌiː.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Recycled (re-Cycled)
– For this word, “e” is long, the first “c” is soft, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the second “c” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ree-SIGH-kəl-[d]//ɹiː.sʌiː.kəl-[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Recycling (re-Cycling)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the first “c” is soft, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ree-SIGH-kəl-ing//ɹiː.ˈsʌiː.kəl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter R ) –


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