– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter R:  Rep ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Rep

 

Ra . Rea . Reb . Rec . Red . Ref . Reg . Reh . Rej . Rel . Rem . Ren . Req . Res . Ret . Reu . Rev . Rew . Rh . Ri . Ro . Ru . Ry

 

Repair
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/rə-PAYR//ɹə.ˈpeɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Repeat
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/rə-PEE[T]//ɹə.ˈpiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Repeated
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/rə-PEE-didh[d]//ɹə.ˈpiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Repeatedly
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single like the long letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” combination turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-PEE-dih[d]-lee//ɹə.ˈpiː.ɾə(ɪ)[d].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Repel
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the second “e” is short

/rə-PEHL//ɹə.ˈpɛl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Repelling
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-PEHL-ing//ɹə.ˈpɛl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Repent
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/rə-PEHN-[t]//ɹə.ˈpɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Repetition
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-pə-TIH-shihn//ˌɹɛ.pə.ˈtɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Rephrase (re-Phrase)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/ree-FRAYZ//ˈɹiː.fɹeiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Replace (re-Place)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-PLAYS//ɹə.ˈpleiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Replacement
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-PLAYS-mihn-[t]//ɹə.ˈpleiːs.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Reply
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/rə-PLAI//ɹə.ˈplaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Report
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/rə-POHR-[t]//ɹə.ˈpoɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Reports
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “o” is long

/rə-POHR-ts//ɹə.ˈpoɹ.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Repossession (re-Possession)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “ss” combination is pronounced like the single letter “z”, the second “e” is short, the third “s” combines with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-ssion” suffix – the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced version of the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ree-poh-ZEH-shin//ˌɹiː.po.ˈzɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Repository
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long “e”

/rə-PAH-zih-toh-ree//ɹə.ˈpɑ.zə(ɪ).toɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Represent (re-Present)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-prə-ZEHN-[t]//ɹɛ.pɹə.zɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Representations (re-Present-ations)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the third “e” is short, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/reh-prə-sehn-TAY-shihn-z//ɹɛ.pɹə.zɛn.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Representative (re-Present-ative)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the third “e” is short, the first “t” is (often) silent, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-prə-ZEH-nə-tihv//ɹɛ.pɹə.ˈzɛ.nə.tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Represents (re-Presents)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-prə-ZEHN-ts//ˌɹɛ.pɹə.ˈzɛn.ts/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Reprimand
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “a” is short

/REH-prih-mæn-d//ˈɹɛ.pɹə(ɪ).mæn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Reprisal
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-PRAI-zəl//ɹə.ˈpɹaiː.zəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Reproduce (re-Produce)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ree-prə-DOOS//ɹiː.pɹə.ˈdus/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Republic
– For this word, the “e” is turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-PUHB-lih[k]//ɹə.ˈpʌb.lɪ[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Reputation
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-pyou-TAY-shihn//ɹɛ.pju.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice that the stress is on the third syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter R ) –


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