– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter R ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Rr

 

Rea . Reb . Rec . Red . Ref . Reg . Reh . Rei . Rej . Rel . Rem . Ren . Reo . Rep . Req . Rer . Res . Ret . Reu . Rev . Rew . Rez . Rh . Ri . Ro . Ru . Ry

 

R
 – The name of the letter “R” is pronounced with the short “o” sound followed by the “r” sound

– /ahr//ɑɹ/

Rabies
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/RAY-beez//ˈɹeiː.biːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Race
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/rays/ – /ɹeiːs/ –

Racial
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RAY-shəl//ˈɹaiː.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Racing
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RAY-sing/ – /ˈreiː.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Racism
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RAY-si-zəm/ – /ˈɹeiː.sə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Racist
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “t” is (often) stopped

– /RAY-sihs-[t]//ˈɹeiː.sə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Racy
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/RAY-see//ˈɹeiː.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Radiant
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ant” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /RAY-dee-ihn-[t]//ˈɹe.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Radical
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-dih-kəl//ˈɹæ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Radio
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “o” is long

/RAY-dee-oh/ – /ˈɹe.ɾiː.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Raffle
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “ff” combination and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/-fəl//ˈɹæ.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Rail
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

/rayl/ – /ˈɹeɪl/ –– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Railroad
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), the “oa” combination is pronounced simply as the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) Stopped

/RAYL-roah[d]/ – /ˈɹeɪl.ɹo[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Railway
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it) and the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/RAYL-way/ – /ˈɹeɪl.weiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Rain
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/rayn/ – /ɹeiːn/ –

Rained
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/rayn-d//ɹeiːn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Raise
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “e” is silent

– /rayz/ – /ɹeiːz/ –

Raised
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /rayz-[d]//ɹeiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Raising
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /RAY-zing//ˈɹeiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Rampant
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/RæM-pihn[t]//ˈɹæm.pə(ɪ)n[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Range
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /rayn-dʒ/ – /ɹeiːn.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable –

Ranging
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /RAYNdʒ-ing//ˈɹeiːn.dʒɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Rank
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/ræng-k//ɹæŋ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Ranked
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/ræng-[k]t//ɹæŋ.[k]t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts at a second syllable

Rankings
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/RæNG-kings/ – /ˈɹæŋ.kɪŋ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as third syllable –

Rapid
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final is a flap-d but is “d” is (often) stopped

/-pih[d]/ – /ˈɹæ.pə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Rapidly
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-pih[d]-lee/ – /ˈɹæ.pə(ɪ)[ɾ].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Rapper
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /-p’r//ˈɹæ.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Rapport
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “t” is silent

/ruh-POHR//ɹə(ʌ).ˈpoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Rare
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “e” is silent

– /rayr//ˈɹeɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Rarely
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is silent,liː and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /RAYR-lee//ˈɹeɪɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Rate
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ray[t]/ – /ɹeiː[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Rather
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “th” combination is voiced, and the “e” disappears

/-th’r/ – /ræ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Rating
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RAY-ding//ˈɹe.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ravel
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “e’ turns into a true-schwa

/Ræ-vəl//ˈɹæ.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Raw
 – For this word, the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” or “saw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/raw/ – /ɹɔ/ –

Rea

Reach
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/ree-ch//ɹiː.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Reached
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the “ch” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /reech-t//ɹiːtʃ.t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

React
 – For this word, the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/ree-[K]-t/ – /ɹiː.ˈjæ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Reaction
 – For this word, the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “e” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ree-æK-shihn/ – /ɹiː.ˈæk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Reactive
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “a” is short, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “e” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ree-æK-tihv//ɹiː.æk.tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Read (past)
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /reh[d]/ – /ɹɛ[ɾ]/ –

Read (present)
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /ree[d]/ – /ɹiː[ɾ]/ –

Reader
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REE-d’r/ – /ˈɹiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Readily
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REH-dih-lee//ˈɹɛ.ɾə(ɪ).liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Reading
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REE-ding/ – /ˈɹiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ready
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/REH-dee/ – /ˈɹɛ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Real
 – For this word, the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

– /ree-əl/ – /ˈɹiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Realistic
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ree-ə-LIHS-tih[k]//ɹiː.ə.ˈlɪs.tɪ[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Reality
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “a” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ree-æ-lih-dee//ɹiː.ˈæ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Realize
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REE-uh-laiz//ˈɹiː.ə.laiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Really
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “a” turns into a true-schwa but almost disappears, the final “l” of the root-word combinations with the “-ly” suffix, “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /REE-[ə]-lee//ˈɹiː.[ə].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Rear
 – For this word, the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/REE-ɚ//ˈɹiː.ɚ/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Reason
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /REE-zihn//ˈriː.zə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Reasonable
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /REE-zih-uh-bəl/ – /ˈɹiː.zə(ɪ)n.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Reasoning
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /REE-zih-ning//ˈriː.zə(ɪ).nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Reasons
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the first “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “o” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /REE-z’n-z//ˈɹiː.zən.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Reassurance (re-Assurance)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ree-uh-SH’R-ihns//ɹiː.ə(ʌ).ˈʃɚ.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Reb

Rebate
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /REE-bay-[t]//ˈriː.beiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Rebellious
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-BEH-lee-ihs/ – /ɹə.ˈbɛl.iː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Rebuild (re-Build)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “i”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ree-BIHL-[d]//ɹiː.ˈbɪl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Rec

Recall (noun) (re-Call)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/REE-kawl//ˈɹiː.kɔl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Recall (verb) (re-Call)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ree-KAWL//ɹiː.ˈkɔl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Receipt
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “p” is silent, and the “t” is (often) stopped

– /rə-SEE[T]//rə.siː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Receive
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

– /rə-SEEV//ɹə.ˈsiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Received
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /rə-SEEV-[d]//ɹə.ˈsiːv.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Recent
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is
(often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REE-sihn-[t]//ˈɹiː.sə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Recently
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /REE-sihn[t]-lee//ˈɹiː.sə(ɪ)n[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Receptacle
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/rə-SEH[P]-tih.kəl//ɹə.ˈsɛ[p].tə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Reception
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-SEH[P]-shihn//ɹə.ˈsɛ[p].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Receptionist
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ist” suffix – and the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-SEH[P]-shihn-ihs[t]//ɹə.ˈsɛ[p].ʃə(ɪ)n.ə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Recession
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the second “e” is short, the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/rə-SEH-shihn//ɹə.ˈsɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Recharge (re-Charge)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ree-CHAHR-dʒ/ – /ɹiː.ˈtʃɑɹ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Rechargeable (re-Charge-able)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is soft, the second “e” is silent, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ree-CHAHR-dʒuh-bəl/ – /ɹiː.ˈtʃɑɹ.dʒə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Recipe
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is long

/REH-sih-pee//ˈɹɛ.sə(ɪ).piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Recipes
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “e” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /REH-sih-peez//ˈɹɛ.sə(ɪ).piːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Reckon
 – For this word,  the “e” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/REH-kihn/ – /ˈɹɛ.kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Reckoned
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/REH-kihn-[d]/ – /ˈɹɛ.kə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Recluse
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/REH-kloos/ – /ˈɹɛ.klus/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Recognition (re-Cognition)
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “first “i” is short, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-ku[g]-NIH-shihn//ɹɛ.kə(ʌ)[g].ˈnɪ.ʃə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Recognize (re-Cognize)
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /REH-kih[g]-naiz//ˈɹɛ.kə(ɪ)[g].naiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Recognized (re-Cognized)
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “i” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /REH-kih[g]-naiz-[d]/ – /ˈɹɛ.kə(ɪ)[g].naiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Recommend (re-Commend)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/reh-kə-MEHN-[d]//ˌɹɛ.kəˈmɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, the major stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Recommendable (re-Commend-able)
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /reh-kuh-MEHN-duh-bəl//ɹɛ.kə(ʌ).ˈmɛn.də(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Recommendation (re-Commend-ation)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-kə-mehn-DAY-shihn//ˌɹɛ.kə.mɛn.ˈdeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the first syllable –

Recommendations (re-Commend-ations)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/reh-kə-mehn-DAY-shihn-z//ˌɹɛ.kə.mɛn.ˈdeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, the major stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a sixth syllable –

Reconcile
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “c” is hard, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/REH-kihn-sail//ˈɹɛ.kə(ɪ)n.saiːl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Reconciliation
– For this word, the “e” is short, the first “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “c” is soft, the first “i” is a short, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-kən-sih-lee-AY-shihn//ɹɛ.kən.sɪ.liː.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fifth syllable –

Reconsider (re-Consider)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and the second “e” disappears

– /ree-kuhn-SIH-d’r//ɹiː.kə(ʌ)n.ˈsɪ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Reconstruct (re-Construct)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the second “c” is hard, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ree-kən-SCHRUHK-[t]//ˌɹiː.kən.ˈstʃɹʌk.[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllablethe major stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Reconstruction (re-Construct-tion)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “C” is hard, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ree-kən-SCHRUHK-shihn//ˌɹiː.kən.ˈstʃɹʌk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Record (noun)
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” disappears, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /REH-k’r-[d]//ˈɹɛ.kɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Record (verb)
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /rə-KOHR-[d]//ɹə.ˈkoɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Records
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” disappears, the “d” is is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/REH-k’r-[d]z/ – /ˈɹɛ.kɚ.[d]z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ds” ending acts as a third syllable

Recording
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-KOHR-ding//ɹə.ˈkoɹ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Recordings
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /rə-KOHR-ding-z//ɹə.ˈkoɹ.ɾɪŋ.z/ – Noticed also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Recover (re-Cover)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “e” disappears

– /rə-KUH-v’r//ɹə.ˈkʌ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Recovery (re-Cover-y)
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the second “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/rə-KUH-v’r-ee//ɹə.ˈkʌ.vɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Recruit
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a trues-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /rə-KROO[T]/ – /ɹə.ˈkɹu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Recruiters
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /rə-KROO-d’rz//ɹə.ˈkɹu.ɾɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Recruiting
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “ui” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-KROO-ding/ – /ɹə.ˈkɹu.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Rectangle
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, and the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “ng” combination), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “g” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/REH[K]-tæng-gəl//ˈɹɛ[k].tæŋ.gəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Rectangular
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the first “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, and the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “ng” combination), the “u” is pronounce like the pronoun “you”, and the second “a” disappears

/reh[k]-TæNG-gyoo-l’r//rɛ[k].ˈtæŋ.gju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Recycle (re-Cycle)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the first “c” is soft, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the second “c” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /ree-SIGH-kəl//ɹiː.ˈsʌiː.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Recycled (re-Cycled)
– For this word, “e” is long, the first “c” is soft, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “c” is hard,  there is a phantom-schwa in-between the second “c” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /ree-SIGH-kəl-[d]//ɹiː.sʌiː.kəl-[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Recycling (re-Cycling)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the first “c” is soft, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ree-SIGH-kəl-ing//ɹiː.ˈsʌiː.kəl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Red

Red
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/reh[d]//ɹɛ[ɾ]/

Reduce
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-DOOS//ɹə.ˈdus / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Reduced
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the “s” sound – the “e” of the “-ed” is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (sometimes) stopped

/rə-DOOS-[t]//ɹə.ˈdus.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts a third syllable –

Reduction
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ree-DUHK-shihn//ɹiː.dʌk.ˈʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Redundant
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “u” is short, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-DUHN-dihn[t]/ – /ɹə.ˈdʌn.də(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ree

Ref

Refer
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the second “e” disappears

– /rə-F’R//ɹə.ˈfɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the seond syllable

Reference
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft,
and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REH-frihn-s//ˈɹɛ.fɹə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

References
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears,for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft,
and the final “e” combines with the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue),  and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /REHF-rehn-sihz//ˈɹɛ.fɹə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Referendum
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, the third “e” is short, and the “u” turns into a true-schwa

/reh-f’r-EHN-dəm//ɹɛ.fɚ.ˈɛn.dəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Referral
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced almost like (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-F’R-rəl//ɹə.ˈfɚ.ɹəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Referrals
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/rə-F’R-əl-z//ɹə.ˈfɚ.əl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Refers
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/rə-F’R-z//ɹə.ˈfɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Refill (re-Fill)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ree-FIHL//ɹiː.ˈfɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Reflect
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/rə-FLEH[K]-t//ɹə.ˈflɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Reflection
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-FLEHK-shuhn//ɹə.ˈflɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice how the stress is on the second syllable

Reform (re-Form)
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “o” is long

/rə-FOHR-m//ɹə.ˈfoɹ.m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “m” ending acts as a third syllable

Refresh (re-Fresh)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

– /rə-FREHSH/ – /ɹə.ˈfɹɛʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Refreshing (re-Fresh-ing)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-FREH-shing/ – /ɹə.ˈfɹɛ.ʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Refreshingly (re-Fresh-ing-ly)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-FREH-shing-lee/ – /ɹə.ˈfɹɛ.ʃɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Refrigerator
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “e” disappears, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-FRIH-dʒ’r-ay-d’r/ – /ɹə.ˈfɹɪ.dʒɚ.e.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Refrigerators
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “e” disappears, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/rə-FRIH-dʒ’r-ay-d’rz/ – /ɹə.ˈfɹɪ.dʒɚ.e.ɾɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Refugees
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “u” if pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “g” is soft, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/REHF-yoo-dʒeez//ˈrɛf.ju.dʒiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Refund (re-Fund)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “u” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/REE-fuhn[d]//ˈɹiː.fʌn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress can be on the first or the second syllable

Refunded (re-Fund-ed)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/rə-FUHN-dih[d]//ɹə.ˈfʌn.də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress can be on the first or the second syllable

Refurbish
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” disappears, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the final “sh” combination is un-voiced

– /ree-F’R-bihsh/ – /ɹiː.ˈfəɹ.bə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Refurbishing
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” disappears, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ree-F’R-bih-shing/ – /ɹiː.ˈfəɹ.bə(ɪ).ʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Refusal (re-Fuse-al)
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-FYOO-zəl//ɹə.ˈfju.zəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Refuse (re-Fuse)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-FYOOZ//ɹə.ˈfjuz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Reg

Regard
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/rə-GAHR-[d]//ɹə.ˈgɑɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Regarded
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /rə-GAHR-dih[d]/ – /ɹə.ˈɡɑɹ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Regarding
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-GAHR-ding//ɹə.ˈgɑɹ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Regime
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

– /rə-ZHEEM//rə.ˈʒiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Region
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “g” is soft, the “io” combination turns into an i-schwa

– /REE-dʒihn//ˈɹiː.dʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Regional
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “g” is soft, the “io” combination turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REE-dʒihn-əl/ – /ˈɹiː.dʒə(ɪ)n.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Regions
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “g” is soft, the “io” combination turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/REE-dʒihn-z//ˈɹiː.dʒə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Register
 – For this word, the “e” is short,the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REH-dʒihs-t’r//ˈɹɛ.dʒə(ɪ)s.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Regret
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/rə-GREH[T]//ɹə.ˈgɹɛ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Regular
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “a” disappears

/REH-gyoo-l’r//ɹɛ.ˈgju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Regularly
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” disappears, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /REHG-you-l’r-lee//ˈɹɛ.gju.lɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Regulate
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REH-gyou-lay[t]//ˈrɛ.gju.laiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Regulated
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped but with the addition of the “-ed” ending – the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” combines with the
“-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” (even if it’s stopped) – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this
is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REH-gyou-lay-dih[d]//ˈrɛ.gju.laiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Regulation
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-gyoo-LAY-shihn//ˌɹɛ.gju.ˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/– Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Regulations
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/reh-gyoo-LAY-shihn-z//ˌɹɛ.gju.ˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/– Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, the major stress is on the third syllable, and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Reh

Rehabilitated
 – For this word the first “e” is long, the “h” is (usually) silent, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “e” and the “a” (taking the place of the “h” if the “h” is not pronounced), the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /ree-yuh-BIHL-ih-tay-dih[d]//ɹiː.jə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lɪ.teiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice that the stress is on the third syllable

Rehydrate (re-Hydrate)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “H” is pronounced, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/ree-HIGH-dʒray[t]//ɹiːˈhʌiː.dʒɹeiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Rei

Rej

Reject
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/rə-JEH[K]-t// ɹə.ˈdʒɛ[k].t / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Rejected
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” of the “-ed” ending is a flap-d but is often stopped

/rə-JEH[K]-tih[d]// ɹə.ˈdʒɛ[k].tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

Rel

Relegated
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” is turns into a i-schwa, the “g” is hard, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/REH-lih-gay-dih-[d]//ˈɹɛ.lə(ɪ).ge.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Relatable
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ree-LAY-duh-bəl//ɹiː.ˈlaiː.d(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Relate
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-LAY[T]//ɹə.ˈle[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Relation
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into a i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-LAY-shihn//ɹə.ˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Relationship
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ship” suffix – the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is an
i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-LAY-shihn-shih[p]//ɹə.ˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Relative
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REH-luh-tihv//ˈɹɛ.lə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Relatively
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REH-luh-tihv-lee//ˈɹɛ.lə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Relax
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/rə--ks//ɹə.ˈlæ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable

Relaxation
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the first “a” is short, “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-læx-AY-shihn/ – /rə.læks.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Relaxed
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (usually) stopped

/rə--ks-[t]//ɹə.ˈlæ.ks.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that both the “ks” combination and the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Relaxing
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-Læk-sing//ɹə.ˈlæk.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Relay (noun)
– For this word, the “e” is long, and the final “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/REE-lay//ˈɹiː.leiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Relay (verb)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/rə-LAY//ɹə.ˈleiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Release
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-LEES//ɹə.ˈliːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Released
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final letter “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /rə-LEES-[t]//ɹə.ˈliːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Relegated
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/REH-lih-gay-dih[d]//ˈɹɛ.lə(ɪ).ge.ɾə(ɪ)ɾ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Relentless (Relent-less)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-less” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-LEHN[T]-lihs//ɹə.ˈlɛn[t].lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Relentlessly (Relent-less-ly)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, for the “-less” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-LEHN[T]-lihs-lee//ɹə.ˈlɛn[t].lə(ɪ)s.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Relevant
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/REH-lə-vihn-[t]//ˈɹɛ.lə.və(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Reliable
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a
phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-LAI-uh-bəl/ – /ɹə.ˈlaiː.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Reliability
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is long, and for the “-ability” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-lai-uh-BIH-lih-dee//ɹə.ˌlaiː.ə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Reliably
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, and for the “-ably” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-LAI-uh-blee//ɹə.ˈlaiː.ə(ʌ).bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Reliance
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-LAI-ihn-s//ɹə.ˈlaiː.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Relief
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/rə-LEEF//ɹə.ˈliːf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Religion
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “g” is soft, and the “io” combination turns into an i-schwa

– /rə-LIH-dʒihn//ɹə.ˈlɪ.dʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Religious
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “i” combines with the “-ous” suffix, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-LIH-dʒihs//ɹə.ˈlɪ.dʒə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Relocation
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the first “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ree-loh-KAY-shihn//ɹiː.lo.keiː.ˈʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Reluctant
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-LUH[K]-tihn-[t]//ɹə.ˈlʌ[k].tə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Rely
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

– /rə-LAI//ɹə.ˈlaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Rem

Remain
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Dipthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/rə-MAYN/ – /ɹə.meiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Remaining
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwaand the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Dipthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-MAY-ning//ɹə.ˈmeiː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Remains
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwaand the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Dipthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/rə-MAYN-z//ɹə.ˈmeiːn.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Remark
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/rə-MAHR-[k]//ɹə.ˈmɑɹ.[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts like a third syllable –

Remarkable (re-Mark-able)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-MAHR-kuh-bəl//ɹə.ˈmɑɹ.kə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Remedy
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” is an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/REH-mih-dee//ˈɹɛ.mə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Remember
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, and the third “e” disappears

/rə-MEHM-b’r//ɹə.ˈmɛm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Remind
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/rə-MAIN-[d]//ɹə.ˈmaiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Reminded
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/rə-MAIN-dih[d]//ɹə.ˈmaiːn.də(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Reminder (re-Mind-er)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-MAIN-d’r//ɹə.ˈmaiːn.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Remodelling (re-Model-ing)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-MAH-də-ling//ɹə.ˈmɑ.ɾə.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Remorse
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-MOHR-s/ – /ɹə.ˈmoɹ.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Remote
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is long, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-MOH-[t]/ – /ɹə.ˈmo.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Removal (re-Move-al)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-MOO-vəl//ɹə.ˈmu.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Remove (re-Move)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-MOOV//ɹə.ˈmuv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Removed (re-Moved)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /rə-MOOV-[d]//ɹə.ˈmuv.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Ren

Renew (re-New)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-NOO//ɹə.ˈnu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Renewable (re-New-able)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-NOO-uh-bəl//ɹə.ˈnu.ə(ʌ)bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Renewal (re-New-al)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-NOO-əl//ɹə.ˈnu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Renovating
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /REH-nuh-vay-ding//ˈɹɛ.nə(ʌ).veiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Renovations
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /REH-nuh-vay-shihn-z//ˈɹɛ.nə(ʌ).veiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Renown
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word, and “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/rə-NOWN//ɹə.ˈnɑun/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Rent
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/rehn-[t]//ɹɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Rented
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/REHN-tih[d]//ˈɹɛn.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Reo

Rep

Repair
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/rə-PAYR//ɹə.ˈpeɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Repeat
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and  the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /rə-PEE[T]//ɹə.ˈpiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Repeated
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/rə-PEE-didh[d]//ɹə.ˈpiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Repeatedly
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single like the long letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” of the “-ed” combination turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-PEE-dih[d]-lee//ɹə.ˈpiː.ɾə(ɪ)[d].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Repel
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the second “e” is short

/rə-PEHL/ – /ɹə.ˈpɛl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Repelling
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-PEHL-ing/ – /ɹə.ˈpɛl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Repent
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/rə-PEHN-[t]//ɹə.ˈpɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Repetition
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-pə-TIH-shihn/ – /ˌɹɛ.pə.ˈtɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Rephrase (re-Phrase)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/ree-FRAYZ//ˈɹiː.fɹeiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Replace (re-Place)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-PLAYS//ɹə.ˈpleiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Reply
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/rə-PLAI//ɹə.ˈplaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Report
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /rə-POHR-[t]//ɹə.ˈpoɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Reports
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “o” is long

– /rə-POHR-ts//ɹə.ˈpoɹ.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Repossession (re-Possession)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “ss” combination is pronounced like the single letter “z”, the second “e” is short, the third “s” combines with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-ssion” suffix – the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced version of the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ree-poh-ZEH-shin//ˌɹiː.po.ˈzɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Repository
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the second “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long “e”

– /rə-PAH-zih-toh-ree//ɹə.ˈpɑ.zə(ɪ).toɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Represent (re-Present)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /reh-prə-ZEHN-[t]//ɹɛ.pɹə.zɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Representations (re-Present-ations)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the third “e” is short, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/reh-prə-sehn-TAY-shihn-z/ – /ɹɛ.pɹə.zɛn.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable –

Representative (re-Present-ative)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the third “e” is short, the first “t” is (often) silent, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-prə-ZEH-nə-tihv//ɹɛ.pɹə.ˈzɛ.nə.tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Represents (re-Presents)
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-prə-ZEHN-ts//ˌɹɛ.pɹə.ˈzɛn.ts/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Reprimand
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “a” is short

/REH-prih-mæn-d//ˈɹɛ.pɹə(ɪ).mæn.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Reprisal
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-PRAI-zəl//ɹə.ˈpɹaiː.zəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Reproduce (re-Produce)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/ree-prə-DOOS//ɹiː.pɹə.ˈdus/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Republic
 – For this word, the “e” is turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-PUHB-lih[k]//ɹə.ˈpʌb.lɪ[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Reputation
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-pyou-TAY-shihn/ – /ɹɛ.pju.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice that the stress is on the third syllable –

Req

Request (re-Quest)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/rə-KWEHS-[t]//ɹə.ˈkwɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts like a third syllable –

Require
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/rə-KWIGH-y’r//ɹə.ˈkwʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Required
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/rə-KWIGH-y’r-[d]//ɹə.ˈkwʌiː.jɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Requirement
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-KWIGH-y’r-mihn-[t]//ɹə.ˈkwʌiː.jɚ.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Requirements
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonat letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-KWIGH-yer-mihn-ts//ɹə.ˈkwʌiː.jɚ.mə(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts like a fifth syllable

Rer

Res

Reschedule (re-Schedule)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “ch” is pronounced like the single hard letter “c”, the second “e” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “u” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

– /ree-SKEH-dʒoo-əl//ɹiː.ˈskɛ.dʒu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Rescue
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and the “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

– /REHS-kyou//ˈɹɛs.kju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Rescued
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and the “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “u” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /REHS-kyou-[d]/ – /ˈɹɛs.kju.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Research (re-Search)
– for this word, the first “e” is long, and the “ea” combination disappears

– /REE-s’r-ch//ˈɹiː.sɚ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a third syllable –

Researchers (re-Search-ers)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ea” combination disappears, the second “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /REE-s’r-ch’r-z/ – /ˈɹiː.sɚ.tʃɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Reservation
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-z’r-VAY-shihn//ˌɹɛ.zɚ.ˈveiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Reserve
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-Z’R-v//ɹə.ˈzɚv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Reserved
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/rə-Z’RV-[d]//ɹə.ˈzɚv.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Reservoir
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the second “e” turns into a u-schwa, the second “r” (almost) disappears, and the “oi” combination is pronounced like a “wah” combination

– /REH-zuh-vwahr//ˈɹɛ.sə(ʌ).vwɑɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Reset (re-Set)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/rə-SEH[T]/ – /ɹə.ˈsɛ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Resident
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REH-zih-dihn-[t]//ˈɹɛ.zə(ɪ).də(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Residential
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the first “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” is short, the “t” combines with the “-tial” suffix, and for the “-tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-zih-DEHN-shəl/ – /ˌɹɛ.zə(ɪ).ˈdɛn.ʃəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Resign
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “i” is long, and the “g” is silent

/rə-ZAIN//ɹə.ˈzaiːn/ – Notice also that the the stress is on the second syllable

Resignation
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is (almost) stopped, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-zih[g]-NAY-shihn//ɹɛ.zə(ɪ)[g].ˈneiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Resigning
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the first “i” is long, the first “g” is silent, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ree-ZAIN-ing//ɹiː.ˈzaiː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Resist
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/rə-ZIHS-[t]//ɹə.ˈzɪs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and the the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Resistance
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “i” is short, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-ZIHS-tihn-s//ɹə.ˈzɪs.tə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Resolve (re-Solve)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-ZAWL-v//ɹə.ˈzɔl.v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Resolved (re-Solved)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /ree-ZAWL-v-[d]//ɹiː.zɔl.v.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable  –

Resonate
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /REH-zuh-nay[t]//ˈɹɛ.zə(ʌ)n.ei[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Resort
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/rə-ZOHR-[t]//ɹə.ˈzoɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Resource (re-Source)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/REE-sohr-s//ɹiː.ˈsoɹ.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Resources (re-Sources)
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, the “c” is soft, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/REE-sohr-sihz//ˈɹiː.soɹ.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Respect
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

– /rə-SPEH[K]-t/ – /ɹə.ˈspɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Respected
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /rə-SPEH[K]-tih[d]/ – /ɹə.ˈspɛ[k].tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Respecting
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-SPEH[K]-ting//ɹə.ˈspɛ[k].tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Respiratory
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for “-ory” suffix – the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REHS-pruh-tohr-ee//ˈɹɛs.pɹə(ʌ).toɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Respond
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/rə-SPAHN-[d]//ɹə.ˈspɑn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Response
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-SPAHN-s//ɹə.ˈspɑn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Responsibilities (Response-abilities)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the plural form of the “-ity” suffix – the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-spahn-sih-BIH-lih-deez//ɹə.ˌspɑn.sə(ɪ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiːz / – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Responsibility (Response-ability)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is short, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-spahn-sə-BIH-lih-dee//ɹə.ˌspɑn.sə.ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Responsible (Response-able)
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/rə-SPAHN-sih-bəl/ – /ɹə.ˈspɑn.sə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Rest
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/rehs-[t]/ – /ɹɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Restaurant
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the disappearance of the “au” combination, thus making sound of the letter “r” the next sound after the “t”), the “au” combination disappears, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/REHS-chrahn-[t]//ˈɹɛs.tʃɹɑn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Restful (Rest-full)
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REHS-[T]-fəl//ˈɹɛs.[t].fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Restore
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-STOHR//ɹə.ˈstoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Restrict
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/rə-SCHRIH[K]-[t]//ɹə.ˈstʃɹɪ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Restricted
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/rə-SCHRIH[K]-tih[d]//ɹə.ˈstʃɹɪ[k].tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Restriction
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-SCHRIH[K]-shihn//ɹə.ˈstʃɹɪ[k].ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Result
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ree-ZUHL-[t]//ɹiː.ˈzʌl.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable  and that the “t” ending acts as a thirds syllable

Results
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “u” is short

– /ree-ZUHL-ts//ɹiː.ˈzʌl-ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Resume
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like almost the letter “z”, the “u” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /rə-ZOOM//ɹə.ˈzum/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Résumé
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “u” is long, and the final “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/REH-zoo-may/ – /ˈɹɛ.zu.meiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ret

Retail
 – For this word, the “e” is long, and the “ai” combination is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

– /REE-tayl//ˈɹiː.teɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Retailer
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REE-tay-l’r-z/ – /ˈɹiː.teɪ.lɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Retailers
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/REE-tay-l’r-z/ – /ˈɹiː.teɪ.lɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Retain
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, and the “ai” combination is pronounce like the Long “A” / long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ree-TAYN//ɹe.ˈteiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Retaliation
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “a” is short, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə--lee-AY-shihn//ɹə.ˌtæ.liː.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Re-thinking
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ree-THING-king//ɹiː.ˈθɪŋ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Retinas
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ti” combination form a “glottal stop” (otherwise the “t” is standard and the “i” is an i-schwa), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/REH’-nuhz//ˈɹɛ.ʔnə(ʌ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Retire
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /rə-TIGH-y’r//ɹə.tʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Retired
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination,, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the second “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /rə-TIGH-y’r'[d]//ɹə.tʌiː.jɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Retiree
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e”

– /rə-TIGH-y’r-ee//ɹə.tʌiː.yɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Retirement
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the second “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-TIGH-y’r-mihn-[t]/ – /ɹə.tʌiːjɚ.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Retreat
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is often stopped

/rə-CHREE[T]//ɹə.ˈtʃɹiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Retrieve
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

– /ree-CHREEV//ɹiː.ˈtʃɹiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Retriever
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rih-CHREE-v’r/ – /ɹə(ɪ).ˈtʃɹiː.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Return
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “u” disappears

– /rə-T’R-n//ɹə.ˈtɚ.n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “n” ending acts as a third syllable –

Returned
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/rə-T’RN-[d]/ – /ɹə.ˈtɚn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Returns
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /rə-T’RN-z//ɹə.ˈtɚn.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Reu

Reunion (re-Union)
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the “o” turns into a u-schwa

– /ree-YOUN-yuhn/ – /riː.ˈjun.jə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Reusable
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “u” sounds like the pronoun “you”, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/ree-YOU-zuh-bəl//ɹiː.juzə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Rev

Reveal
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into a u-schwa

/rə-VEE-əl//ɹə.ˈviː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Revenge
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-VEHN-dʒ//ɹə.ˈvɛn.dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Revenue
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

– /REH-vih-noo//ˈɹɛ.və(ɪ).nu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Reverence
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft,
and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REHV-rihn-s//ˈɹɛv.ɹə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

Reverse
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-V’R-s/ – /ɹə.ˈvɚ.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

Review
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/rə-VYOO//ɹə.ˈvju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Revise
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “s”, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-VAIZ//ɹə.ˈvaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Revision
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-VIH-zhihn//ɹə.ˈvɪ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Revive
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/rih-VAIV//ɹə(ɪ).ˈvaiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Revoke
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a trues-schwa, the “o” is long, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/rə-VOH[K]//ɹə.ˈvo[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Revoked
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a trues-schwa, the “o” is long, the “k” is (usually) stopped, the final “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “k” (even if it is stopped) – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/rə-VOH[K]-t//ɹə.ˈvo[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a separate syllable

Revolution
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/reh-və-LOO-shihn//ˌɹɛ.və.ˈlu.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Rew

Reward
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/rə-WOHR-[d]//ɹə.ˈwoɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Rez

Rh

Rheumatism
 – For this word, the “Rh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “R”, the “eu” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ROO-muh-tih-zəm//ˈɹu.mə(ʌ).tə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Rhinitis
 – For this word, the “Rh” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “R”, the first “i” is long, the second “i” is pronounced like the ‘igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the third “i” is an i-schwa

/rai-NIGH-dis//ɹaiː.ˈnʌiː.ɾə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Rhythm
 – For this word, the “Rh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “R”, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “th” combination is voiced, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “th” combination and the letter “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/RIH-thəm//ˈɹɪ.ðəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ri

Rice
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c”‘ is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/righs//ɹʌiːs/ –

Rich
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/rih-ch//ɹɪ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a separate syllable

Rid
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/rih[d]//ɹɪ[ɾ]/

Ride
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “e” is silent

/raid//ɹaiːɾ/ –

Rider
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the final “e” of the root-word combines with the “-er” suffix, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this
suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rai-d’r//ˈɹaiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ridicule
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “e” is silent

/RIH-dih-kyool/ – /ˈɹɪ.ɾə(ɪ).kjul/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ridicules
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/RIH-dih-kyoul-z/ – /ˈɹɪ.ɾə(ɪ).kjul.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Ridiculous
 – For this word, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /rə-DIH-kyou-lihs//ɹə.ˈdɪ.kju.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Riding
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RAI-ding//ɹaiː.ˈɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Right
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “fight” or “night” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/righ[t]//ɹʌiː[t]/

Rightly
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “fight” or “night” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RIGH[T]-lee//ˈɹʌiː[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Rights
 – For this word, and the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “fight” or “night” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/righ[t]//ɹʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Rigorous
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard, the first “o” disappears, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RIH-g’r-ihs//ˈrɪ.gɚ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ring
 – For this word, and the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “fling” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/ring//ɹɪŋ/ –

Rinse
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “e” is silent

– /rihn-s//ɹɪn.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable –

Riot
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/RAI-ih[t]//ˈɹaiː.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Riots
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/RAI-ih-ts//ˈɹaiː.ə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Rioters
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/RAI-ih-d’r-z/ – /ˈɹaiː.ə(ɪ).dɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Rise
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/raiz/ – /ɹaiːz/ –

Rising
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RAI-zing//ˈɹaiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Risk
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/rih-sk//ɹɪ.sk/ – Notice also that the “sk” ending acts as a second syllable

Ritualistic
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/rih-choo-ə-LIHS-tihk//ˌɹɪ.tʃu.ə.ˈlɪs.tə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the main stress is on the first syllable

Rival
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/RAI-vəl//ˈɹaiː.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Rivals
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /RAI-vəl-s//ˈɹaiː.vəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

River
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “e” disappears

/RIH-v’r//ˈɹɪ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ro

Road
 – For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /roh-[d]//ɹo.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts like a second syllable –

Rob
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “b” is (sometimes) stopped

/rah[b]//ɹɑ[b]/

Robbed
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” but is almost stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root word ends with the letter “b” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/rah[b]-d//ˈɹɑ[b].d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable –

Robber
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RAH-b’r//ˈɹɑ.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Robbery
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/RAH-b’r-ee//ˈɹɑ.bɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Robin
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the “i” turns into an i-schwa

– /RAH-bihn//ˈɹɑ.bə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Robust
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/roh-BUHS-[t]//ɹo.ˈbʌs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Rock
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/rahk//ɹɑk/

Rocks
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /rah-ks/ – /ɹɑ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable –

Role
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/rohl//ɹol/

Roles
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the final “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/rohl-z//ɹol.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Roll
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/rohl//ɹol/

Roll-Out
 – For this word, the first “o” is long, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “Ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ROH-low[t]//ˈɹo.lɑu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Roman
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-man” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ROH-mihn//ˈɹo.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Romania
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/roh-MAY-nee-uh//ɹo.ˈmeiː.niː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Romanian
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into an i-schwa

/roh-MAY-nee-ihn//ɹo.ˈmeiː.niː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Romans/’s
 – For these words, the “o” is long, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /ROH-mihn-z//ˈɹo.mə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Romantic
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the ‘a” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is
(sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rə-MæN-tih[k]//ɹə.ˈmæn.tə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Roof
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/roof//ɹuf/

Room
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/room//ɹum/

Root
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/roo[t]//ɹu[t]/ – Notice also that –

Rope
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “p”  (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/roh[p]//ɹo[p]/

Rough
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”, and the “gh” combination is pronounced like the letter “f”

/ruhf//ɹʌf/ – Notice also that –

Rougher
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”, the “gh” combination is pronounced like the letter “f”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RUH-f’r//ˈɹʌ.fɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Roughly
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”, the “gh” combination is pronounced like the letter “f”, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RUHF-lee//ˈɹʌf.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Round
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/rown-[d]//ɹɑun.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Rounded
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/ROWN-dih[d]//ˈɹɑun.də(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Route
 – There are two common pronunciations of this word in The Common Tongue:  In one pronunciation, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) – in the other pronunciation, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the simply like the long letter “u” – and in both pronunciations, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/row[t]/ – /ɹɑu[t]/ –  -Or-  – /roo[t]/ – /ɹu[t]/ –

Router
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ROW-d’r/ – /ˈrɑu.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Routine
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/roo-TEEN//ɹu.ˈtiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Row
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/roh//ɹo/

Royal
 – For this word, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “toy” or “annoy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ROY-əl//ˈɹoiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Ru

Rub
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the “b” is (often) stopped

/ruh[b]//ɹʌ[b]/

Rubber
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RUH-b’r//ˈɹʌ.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Rubbish
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RUH-bihsh//ˈɹʌ.bə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ruble
 – For this word, the “u” is long, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/ROO-bəl//ˈru.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Rubles
 – For this word, the “u” is long, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ROO-bəl-z//ˈru.bəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Rubrics
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard

/ROO-brih-ks//ˈɹu.bɹə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable –

Rude
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/roo[d]//ɹu[ɾ]/

Rudely
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ROO[D]-lee//ˈɹʌ[ɾ].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Rugged
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “g” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /RUH-gih-[d]//ˈɹʌ.gə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable

Ruin
 – For this word, the “u” is long, and the “i” is an i-schwa

/ROO-ihn//ˈɹu.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ruined
 – For this word, the “u” is long, and the “i” is an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/ROO-ihn-[d]//ˈɹu.ə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Ruins
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/ROO-ihn-z//ˈɹu.ɪn.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Ruler
 – For this word, the “u” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this
suffix in The Common Tongue)

/ROO-l’r//ˈɹu.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Ruling
 – For this word, the “u” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /ROO-ling//ˈɹu.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Rumor
 – For this word, the “u” is long, and the “o” disappears

– /ROO-m’r/ – /ˈɹu.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Rumors
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “o” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /ROO-m’r-z/ – /ˈɹu.mɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Run
 – For this word, the “u” is short

– /ruhn//ɹʌn/

Runner
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RUH-n’r//ˈɹʌ.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Running
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /RUH-ning//ˈɹʌ.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Rural
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /RəR-uhl//ˈɹə.ɹə(ʌ)l/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Rush
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/ruh-sh//ɹʌ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” combination acts as a second syllable

Russia
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “ia” combination turns into a u-schwa

– /RUH-shuh//ˈɹʌ.ʃə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Russian
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “ia” combination turns into an i-schwa

– /RUH-shihn//ˈɹʌ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Russians
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “ia” combination turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /RUH-shihn-z//ˈɹʌ.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Rust
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/ruhs-[t]//rʌs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a separate syllable

Ry

Rye
 – For this word, the “ye” combination is pronounced like the long letter “i”

– /rai//ɹaiː/

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter R ) –


Jump To…

Aa . Bb . Cc . Dd . Ee . Ff . Gg . Hh . Ii . Jj . Kk . Ll . Mm . Nn . Oo . Pp . Qq . Rr . Ss . Tt . Uu . Vv . Ww . Xx . Yy . Zz
Numbers

 


 

Explore GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!

Leave a Reply

Yo!