– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter S:  Sa ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue — a.k.a. — American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in The English Language, with more words added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of The English Language — both world-wide, and through-out America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Sa

 

Sc . Se . Sh . Si . Sk . Sl . Sm . Sn . So . Sp . Sq . St . Su . Sw . Sy

 

 

 

Sabotage
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/-buh-tahzh//ˈsæ.bə(ʌ).tɑʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Saboteur
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “eu” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/sæ-bə-TOO-w’r//sæ.bə.ˈtu.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Saboteurs
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “eu” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/sæ-bə-TOO-w’r-z//sæ.bə.ˈtu.wɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Sack
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) but is (often) stopped

/sæ-[k]//sæ.[k]/

 

Sad
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/sæ[d]//sæ[ɾ]/

 

Sadly
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, liːand for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/[D]-lee//sæ[ɾ].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sadness
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/[D]-nihs//ˈsæ[ɾ].nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Safe
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/sayf//seiːf/

 

Safeguard
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is silent, the “g” is hard, the “ua” combination is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/SAYF-gahr-[d]//ˈseiːf.gɑɹ.[ɾ] / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Safely
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAYF-lee//ˈseiːf.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Safety
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is silent, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SAYF-tee//ˈseiːf.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Saharan
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the second “a” is Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the third “a” turns into an i-schwa

/suh-HAYR-ihn//sə(ʌ).ˈheɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Said
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) Stopped

/seh[d]//sɛ[ɾ]/

 

Sail
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

/sayl//seɪl/

 

Sailboat
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/SAYL-boh[t]//ˈseɪl.bo[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sailing
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAY-ling//ˈseɪ.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sailor
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and for the “-or” suffixthe “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAY-l’r//ˈseiː.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Saint
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sayn-[t]//seiːn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Salad
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/-lih[d]//ˈsæ.lə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Salary
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/-luh-ree//ˈsæ.lə(ʌ).ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sale
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “a” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/sayl//seɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sales
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), there is a phantom-schwa in between the “a” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/say-əl-z//seɪ.əl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Salesman
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), there is a phantom-schwa in between the “a” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-man” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAYL-z-mihn//ˈseɪl.z,mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” sound of the second “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Saleswoman
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), there is a phantom-schwa in between the “a” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-woman” suffix – the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAYL-z-wə.mihn//ˈseɪl.z.wə.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” sound of the second “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Salmon
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “l” is silent, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/-mihn//ˈsæ.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Salt
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sawl-[t]//sɔl.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Salty
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SAWL-tee//ˈsɔl.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Samaritan
– For this word, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the last “a” turns into an i-schwa

/suh-MAYR-ih-tihn//sə(ʌ).meɪɹ.ə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Same
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/saym//seiːm/

 

Sample
– For this word, the “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/SæM-pəl//ˈsæm.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Samples
– For this word, the “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SæM-pəl.z//ˈsæm.pəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

San Francisco
– For this city’s name, the first “a” is short, the second “a” is short, the “c” is soft, the “i” is short, the second “c” is hard, and the final “o” is long

/sæn-fræn-SIHS-koh//sæn fɹæn.ˈsɪs.ko/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Sand
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/sæn-[d]//sæn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Sandal
– For this word, the first “a” is short, and the second “a” disappears

/SæN-dəl//ˈsæn.dəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sandals
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SæN-dəl-z//ˈsæn.dəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Sang
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “ring”, “rang,” or “rung” (This is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/sæng//sæŋ/

 

Sanitarium
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “u” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “u” is a u-schwa

/sæ-nih-TAYR-ee-yuhm//sæ.nə(ɪ).ˈteɪɹ.iː.jə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Saskatchewan
– For this word, the first “a” turns into an i-schwa, the second “a” is short, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the third “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/sih-SKæ-chə-wahn//sə(ɪ).ˈskæ.tʃə.wɑn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Satin
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “i” is an i-schwa

/-[t]ihn//ˈsæ.[t]ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Satire
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r”, and the final “e” is silent

/-tigh-y’r//ˈsæ.tʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the phantom letter “y” & letter “r” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Satisfaction
– For this word, the first “s” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sæ-dihs-FæK-shihn//sæ.ɾə(ɪ)s.ˈfæk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Satisfied
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/-dihs-fai[d]//ˈsæ.ɾə(ɪ)s.faiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Satisfy
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/-dihs-fai//ˈsæ.ɾə(ɪ)s.faiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Satisfying
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-dihs-fai-ying//ˈsæ.ɾə(ɪ)s.faiː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Saturate
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, for the “-ate” suffixthe “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciations of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/-ch’r-ay[t]//ˈsæ.tʃɚ.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Saturated
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, for the “-ate” suffixthe “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/-ch’r-ay-tih[d]//ˈsæ.tʃɚ.e.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Saturation
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sæ-ch’r-AY-shihn//sæ.tʃɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Saturday
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is flap-t, the “u” disappears, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/-d’r-day//ˈsæ.ɾəɹ.ɾeɪ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sauce
– For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/saw-s//sɔ.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Saudi Arabia
– For the name of this country, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, then the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the third “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/sow-dee uh-RAY-bee-uh//ˌsau.diː ə(ʌ).ˈɹe.biː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Saudi Arabian
– For this term, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, then the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the third “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the third second “i” and the third “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the third “a” turns into an i-schwa

/sow-dee uh-RAY-bee-yihn//ˌsau.diː ə(ʌ).ˈɹe.biː.jɪ(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Sauna
– For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/SAW-nuh//ˈsɔ.nə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sausage
– For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/SAW-sih-dʒ//ˈsɔ.sə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Savasana
– For this word, the “S” is pronounced like the un-voiced “Sh” combination, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the third “a” disappears, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/shuh-VAHS-nuh//ʃə(ʌ).ˈvɑs.nə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Save
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/sayv//seiːv/

 

Saving
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAY-ving//ˈse.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Savvy
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “vv” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “v”, and the final letter “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/-vee//ˈsæ.viː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Saw
– For this word, the “aw” combination is pronounce like in the word “law” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/saw//sɔ/

 

Say
– For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/say//seiː/

 

Saying
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “y” takes the consonant sound, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAY-ying//ˈseiː.yɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Says
– For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the short letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/sehz//sɛz/

 

– ( American English PronunciationLetter S ) –


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