– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter S:  Se ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Se

 

Sa . Sc . Sh . Si . Sk . Sl . Sm . Sn . So . Sp . Sq . St . Su . Sw . Sy

Sea
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/see//siː/

 

Seal
– For this word, the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/SEE-əl//ˈsiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Search
– For this word, the “ea” combination disappears

/s’r-ch//sɚ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Searching
– For this word, the “ea” combination disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s’r-ching//sɚ.tʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Seaside
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/SEE-sai[d]//ˈsiː.saiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Season
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/SEE-zihn//ˈsiː.zə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Seasonal
– For this word, the “ea” is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEE-zihn-əl//ˈsiː.zə(ɪ)n.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Seasoned
– For this word, the “ea” is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/SEE-zihn-[d]//ˈsiː.zə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Seat
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/see[t]//siː[t]/

 

Seats
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/see-ts//siː.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Second
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/SEH-kihn-[t]//ˈsɛ.kə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Seconds
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/SEH-kihn-ts//ˈsɛ.kə(ɪ)n.ds/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Secondary
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-kihn-dayr-ee//ˈsɛ.kə(ɪ)n.deɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Secret
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/SEE-krih[t]//ˈsiː.kɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Secretary
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SEH-krə-tayr-ee//ˈsɛ.kɹə.teɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Section
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHK-shihn//ˈsɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sector
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the “o” disappears

/SEH[K]-t’r//ˈsɛ[k].tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Secular
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “a” disappears

/SEH-kyoo-l’r//ˈsɛ.kju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Secure
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/sə-KYOO-ər//sə.ˈkju.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Secured
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/sə-KYOO-ər-[d]//sə.ˈkju.ɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the secured syllable and that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Security
– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sih-KYOO-rih-dee//sə(ɪ).kju.ɹə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Sedentary
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-dihn-tayr-ee//ˈsɛ.ɾə(ɪ)n.teɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Seductive
– For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-DUHK-tihv//sə.ˈdʌk.tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

See
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/see//siː/

 

Seed
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is and flap-d but is (often) stopped

/see[d]//siː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Seek
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/see[k]//siː[k]/

 

Seem
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/seem//siːm/

 

Seemed
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/seem-[d]//siːm.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Seemingly
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEE-ming-lee//ˈsiː.mɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Seems
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/seem-z//siːm.z/ – Notice also that that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Segmentation
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sehg-mihn-TAY-shihn//seg.mə(ɪ)n.ˈtaiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Segregation
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “g” is hard, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/seh-grə.GAY-shihn//sɛ.gɹə.ˈgeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Seizures
– For this word, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “z” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, the second “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounce almost like the letter “z”

/SEE-zh’r-z//ˈsiː.ʒɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Select
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the “t” is almost stopped

/sə-LEH[K]-t//səˈlɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Selection
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-LEHK-shihn//sə.ˈlɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Self
– For this word, the “e” is short

/sehl-f//sɛl.f/ – Notice also that the “f” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Self-Sufficient
– For this term, the first “e” is short, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sehl-f-suh-FIH-shehn-[t]//ˌsɛlf-sʌ.ˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first word, that the major stress is on the second syllable of the second word, and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

Selfie
– For this word, the first “e” is short, and the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/SEHL-fee//ˈsɛl.fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sell
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/sehl//sɛl/

 

Seminar
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/SEH-mih-nahr//ˈsɛ.mə(ɪ).nɑɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Seminary
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SEH-mih-nayr-ee//ˈsɛ.mə(ɪ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Senate
– For this word, the first “e” is short, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the
final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-nih[t]//ˈsɛ.nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Senator
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHN-ə-t’r//ˈsɛ.nə.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Send
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/sehn-[d]//sɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Senior
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEEN-y’r//ˈsiːn.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sensationalism
– For this word, the “e” is short, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sehn-SAY-tion-əl.ih-zəm//sɛn.ˈseiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.əl.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Sense
– For this word, the first “e” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/sehn-s//sɛn.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Sensible
– For this word, the first “e” is short, and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHN-sih-bəl//ˈsɛn.sə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sensitive
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is
the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHN-sih-tihv//ˈsɛn.sə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sentence
– For this word, the first “e” is short, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHN-tihn-s//ˈsɛn.tə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “s” acts as a third syllable

 

Sentenced
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/SEHN-[t]ihn-s[t]//ˈsɛn.[t]ə(ɪ)n.s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable (even when the “t” is stopped)

 

Sentences
– For this word, the first “e” is short, for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” combines with the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/SEHN-tihn-sihz//ˈsɛn.tə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Separable
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “a” disappears, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-p’r-uh-bəl//ˈsɛ.pɚ.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Separate
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “a” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-prih[t]//ˈsɛ.pɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Separated
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “a” disappears, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-p’r-ay-dih[d]//ˈsɛ.pɚ.eɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Separately
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “a” disappears, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHP-rih[t]-lee//ˈsɛp.ɹə(ɪ)[t].liː/ – Notice also the stress is on the first syllable

 

Separation
– For this word, the “e” is short, the first “a” disappears, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/seh-p’r-AY-shihn//sɛ.pɚ.ˈe.ʃə(ɪ)n/ –Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

September
– For this word, the first “e” is short but almost turns into a schwa, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the second “e” is short, and the third “e” disappears

/seh[p]-TEHM-b’r//sɛ[p].ˈtɛm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Sequence
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEE-kwihn-s//ˈsiː.kwɪn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Series
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounce almost like the letter “z”

/SEER-eez//ˈsiːɹ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Serious
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEER-ee-yihs//ˈsiːɹ.iː.jə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Seriously
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEER-ee-yihs-lee//ˈsiːɹ.iː.jə(ɪ)s.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Servant
– For this word, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/S’R-vihn-[t]//ˈsɚ.və(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Serve
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/s’r-v//sɚ.v/ – Notice also that the “v” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Served
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is often stopped

/s’r-v-d//sɚ.v.d/ – Notice also that the “v” and the “d” ending act as separate syllables

 

Service
– For this word, the first “e” disappears, ə(ɪ)s – , and for the “-ice” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/S’R-vihs//ˈsɚ.və(ɪ)s/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Session
– For this word, the “e” is short, the first “s” combines with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-ssion” suffix – the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-shihn//ˈsɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Set
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/seh[t]//sɛ[t]/

 

Setting
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-ding//ˈsɛ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Settle
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

/SEH-dəl//ˈsɛ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Seven
– For this word, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” turns into an i-schwa

/SEH-vihn//ˈsɛ.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Seventeen
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-teen” suffix – the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination and this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/seh-vihn-TEEN//sɛ.və(ɪ)n.ˈtiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Seventh
– For this word, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/SEH-vihn-th//ˈsɛ.və(ɪ)n.θ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Seventy
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SEH-vihn-dee//ˈsɛ.və(ɪ)n.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Seventy-Seven
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the third “e” is short, and the forth “e” turns into an i-schwa

/seh-vihn-dee-SEH-vihn//sɛ.və(ɪ)n.ɾiː.ˈsɛ.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the forth syllable

 

Several
– For this word, the the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHV-rəl//ˈsɛv.ɹəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Severance
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHV-rihn-s//ˈsɛv.ɹə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Severe
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is long, and the last “e” is silent

/sə-VEER//sə.ˈviːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “r” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Severely
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is long, the third “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-VEER-lee//sə.ˈviːɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “r” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Severed
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/SEH-v’r-d//ˈsɛ.vɚ.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Sew
– For this word, the “ew” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “o”

/soh//so/

 

Sewing
– For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SOH-wing//ˈso.wɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sex
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/seh-ks//sɛ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Sexist
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHK-sihs-[t]//ˈsɛk.sə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Sexual
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ksh” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEK-shoo-əl//ˈsɛk.ʃu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sexualized
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ksh” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/SEK-shoo-əl-aiz-[d]//ˈsɛk.ʃu.əl.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter S ) –


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