– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter S:  Sh ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Sh

 

Sa . Sc . Se . Si . Sk . Sl . Sm . Sn . So . Sp . Sq . St . Su . Sw . Sy

Shade
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong , the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/shay[d]//ʃeiː[ɾ]/

 

Shadow
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/SHæ-doh//ˈʃæ.ɾo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shake
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/shay-k//ˈʃeiː.k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” acts as a separate syllable

 

Shaking
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHAY-king//ˈʃeiː.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shaky
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SHAY-kee//ˈʃeiː.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shall
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/shæl//ʃæl/

 

Shallow
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/SHæ-loh//ˈʃæ.lo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shame
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/shaym//ʃeiːm/

 

Shape
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/shay[p]//ʃe[p]/

 

Shaped
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending, is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/say[p]-t//ʃe[p].t / – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Shapers
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a True Long “A”, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SHAY-p’r-z//ˈʃe.pɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Share
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/shayr//ʃeɪɹ/

 

Shareholders
– This compound word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” is silent, the second “h” is pronounced, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SHAYR-hohl-d’r-z//ˈʃeɪɹ.hol.ɾɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Sharing
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHAYR-ing//ˈʃeɪɹ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shark
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/shahr-[k]//ʃɑɹ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Sharp
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/shahr-[k]//ʃɑɹ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Sharply
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “p” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHAHR-[p]lee//ˈʃɑɹ.[p]liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shatter
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the ‘tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/SHæ-d’r//ʃæ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shattered
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the ‘tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/SHæ-d’r-[d]//ʃæ.ɾɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Shave
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/shayv//ʃev/

 

She
– For this word, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and the final “e” is long

/shee//ʃiː/

 

Sheep
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/shee[p]//ˈʃiː[p]/

 

Sheet
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/shee[t]//ʃiː[t]/

 

Shelf
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is short

/shel-f//ʃɛl.f/ – Notice also that the “f” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Shell
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/shehl//ʃɛl/

 

Shelter
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” disappears

/SHEHL-t’r//ˈʃɛl.tɚ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shepherd
– For this word, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the first “e” is short, the “h” is silent, the second “e” disappears, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/SHEH-p’r-[d]//ˈʃɛ.pɚ.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Shift
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/shihf.[t]//ʃɪf.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Shifty
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SHIHF-tee//ˈshɪf.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shimmer
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the first “i” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/SHIH-m’r//ˈʃɪ.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shimmering
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the first “i” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHIH-m’r-ing//ˈʃɪ.mɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shine
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/shain//ʃaiːn/

 

Shiny
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SHAI-nee//ˈʃaiː.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Ship
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/shih[p]//ʃɪ[p]/

 

Shirt
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sh’r-[t]//ʃɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Shock
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (This is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/shahk//ʃɑk/

 

Shocked
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) however it is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/shah[k]-t//ʃɑ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Shocking
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHAH-king//ˈʃɑ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shoe
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, and the “oe” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/shoo//ʃu/

 

Shoes
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “oe” that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/shooz//ʃuz/

 

Shoot
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “oo” is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/shoo[t]//ʃu[t]/

 

Shooting
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “oo” is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a flap, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHOO-ding//ˈʃu.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shop
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short, and the final “p” is (usually) stopped

/shah-[p]//ʃɑ.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Shops
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short

/shah-ps//ʃɑ.ps/ – Notice also that the “ps” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Shopaholic
– For this ridiculous word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the first “o” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “o” pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/shah-puh-HAWL-ih[k]//ʃɑ.pə(ʌ).ˈhɔ.lə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Shopping
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHAH-ping//ˈʃɑ.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Short
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/shohr-[t]//ʃoɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Shorten
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is long, the “t” becomes into a glottal stop, and the first “e” disappears

/SHOHR-‘n//ˈʃoɹ.ʔ.n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “n”

 

Shortened
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is long, the “t” becomes into a glottal stop, the first “e” disappears, and since the root-word (+ the “-en” suffix) ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is often stopped

/SHOHR-‘n-[d]//ˈʃoɹ.ʔ.n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “n” and the “d” (when not stopped) acts as separate syllables

 

Shortly
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is long, the “t” becomes into a glottal stop, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHOHR-[t]-lee//ˈʃoɹ.ʔ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shot
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/shah[t]//ʃɑ[t]/

 

Shots
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short

/shah-ts//ʃɑ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Should
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “oul” combination is prounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/shəih[d]//ʃəɪ[ɾ]/

 

Shoulder
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o”, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHOHL-d’r//ˈʃol.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shouldn’t
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “oul” combination is prounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom i-schwa in-between the “d” and the “n” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/shəih-dihn-[t]//ʃəɪ.ɾə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “t” (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Shout
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/show-[t]//ʃɑ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Shouted
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/SHOW-dih-[d]//ˈʃau.ɾə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Shovel
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “e” disappears

/SHUH-v’l//ˈʃʌ.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Show
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/shoh//ʃo/

 

Shows
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/shoh-z//ʃo.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Showed
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “ow” is pronounced simply like the long letter “o”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “o” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) “stopped”

/shoh-[d]//ʃo.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Shower
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHAH-w’r//ˈʃɑ.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shrimp
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/shrihm-[p]//ʃɹɪm.[p]/ – Notice also that that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Shuffle
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “f” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/SHUH-fəl//ˈʃʌ.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shut
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/shuh-[t]//ʃʌ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Shut-Eye
– For this term, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “u” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “Eye” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/SHU-dai//ˈʃʌ.ɾaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Shy
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/shai//ʃaiː/

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter S ) –


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