– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter S:  Si ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Si

 

Sa . Sc . Se . Sh . Sk . Sl . Sm . Sn . So . Sp . Sq . St . Su . Sw . Sy

Sick
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) but here it is (often) stopped

/sih[k]//sɪ[k]/

 

Side
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/sai[d]//saiː[ɾ]/

 

Sideways
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/sai[d]-wayz//ˈsaiː[ɾ].weiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sieve
– For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the short letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/sihv//sɪv/

 

Sight
– For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night” or “fright” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sigh-[t]//sʌiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

-sightedness
– For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night” or “fright” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a flap-t, then for the “-ed” suffix – since the root-word ends in the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” suffix turns into an i-schwa and the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/sigh-dih[d]-nihs//sʌiː.t.ə(ɪ)[ɾ].nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Sight-Seeing
– This word is pronounced as two separate words. For the first word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night” or “fright” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped. For the second word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply as the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “ee” combination and the “i” of the “-ing” ending (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIGH-[T]-see-ying//ˈsʌiː.[t].siː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Sign
– For this word, the “i” is long, and the “g” is silent

/sain//saiːn/

 

Signage
– For this word, the “i” is long, the first “g” is silent, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAI-nih-dʒ//ˈsaiː.nə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Signal
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIH[G]-nəl//ˈsɪ[g].nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Signals
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like he letter “z”

/SIHG-nəl-z//ˈsɪg.nəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Signature
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIH[G]-nih-ch’r//ˈsɪ[g].nə(ɪ).tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Signed
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

/sain-d//saiːn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Significant
– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sih[g]-NIH-fih-kihn-[t]//sə(ɪ)[g].ˈnɪ.fə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Significantly
– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sih[g]-NIH-fih-kihn-[t]-lee//sə(ɪ)[g].ˈnɪ.fə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)n.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Silence
– For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAI-lihn-s//ˈsaiː.lə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Silent
– For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAI-lihn-[t]//ˈsaiː.lə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Silently
– For this word, the “i” is long,for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAI-lihn[t]-lee//ˈsaiː.lə(ɪ)n[t].liː/

 

Silk
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “k” ending is (sometimes) stopped

/sihl-[k]//ˈsɪl.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) act as a second syllble

 

Silky
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SIHL-kee//ˈsɪl.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Silver
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “e” disappears

/SIHL-v’r//ˈsɪl.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Similar
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into a true-schwa, and the “a” disappears

/SIH-mə-l’r//ˈsɪ.mə.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Similarities
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/sih-mə-LAYR-ih-deez//sɪ.mə.ˈleɪɹ.ɪ.ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Similarity
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sih-mə-LAYR-ih-dee//sɪ.mə.ˈleɪɹ.ɪ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Similarly
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” disappears, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIH-mə-l’r-ly//ˈsɪ.mə.lɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Simple
– For this word, the “i” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/SIHM-pəl//ˈsɪm.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Simplification
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sihm-plih-fih-KAY-shihn//ˌsɪ,plə(ɪ).fə(ɪ).ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Simplify
– For this word, the “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/SIHM-plih-fai//ˈsɪm.plə(ɪ).faiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Simply
– For this word, the “i” is short, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIHM-plee//ˈsɪm.pliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Simulate
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ate” suffix –, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIHM-yoo-lay[t]//ˈsə(ɪ)m.ju.le[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Simulating
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIHM-yoo-lay-ding//ˈsə(ɪ)m.ju.le.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Simulation
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh”combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sihm-yoo-LAY-shihn//sə(ɪ)m.ju.ˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n / – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Simulators
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “o” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SIHM-yoo-lay-d’rz//ˈsɪm.ju.le.ɾɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Simultaneously
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is long, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sai-məl-TAY-nee-uhs-lee//saiː.məl.ˈteiː.niː.ə(ɪ)s.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Since
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent

/sihns//sɪns/

 

Sincere
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/sihn-SEER//sə(ɪ)n.ˈsiːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Sincerely
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “e” is long, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sihn-SEER-lee//sə(ɪ)n.ˈsiːɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Sincerity
– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final”y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sihn-SAYR-ih-dee//sə(ɪ)n.ˈseɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Sinewy
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “ew” combination sounds like the pronoun “you”, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SIHN-you-ee//ˈsɪn.ju.iː/ – Notice that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Sing
– For this word, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/sing//sɪŋ/

 

Singer
– For this word, the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SING-’r//ˈsɪŋ.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Singers
– For this word, the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SING-’r-z//ˈsɪŋ.ɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Singing
– For this word, the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix)

/SING-ing//ˈsɪŋ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Single
– For this word, and the “-in” combination is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “g” is hard (it is pronounced separately from the “in” combination), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “g” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/SING-gəl//ˈsɪŋ.gəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sings
– For this word, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/sing-z//sɪŋ.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Singular
– For this word, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination, the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “in” combination, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “You”, and the “a” disappears

/SING-gyoo-l’r//ˈsɪŋ.gju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sink
– For this word, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly behind it), and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/sing-[k]//sɪŋ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Sinusitis
– For this word, the first “i” is long, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the last “i” is an i-schwa

/sai-nihs-IGH-dihs//ˌsaiː.nə(ɪ)s.ʌiː.ɾɪs/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Sir
– For this word, the “i” disappears

/d’r//sɚ/

 

Sister
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIHS-t’r//ˈsɪs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Sit
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sih[t]//sɪ[t]/

 

Site
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/sigh[t]//sʌiː[t]/

 

Sites
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “e” is silent

/sigh-ts//sʌiː.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Situation
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “u” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sih-choo-WAY-shihn//sɪ.tʃu.weiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Situations
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it) the “u” is long, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “u” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/sih-choo-AY-shihn//sɪ.tʃu.eiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Six
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/sih-ks//sɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Sixteen
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-teen” suffix – the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination and this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sih-ks-TEEN//sɪ.ks.ˈtiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Sixth
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/sih-ks-th//sɪ.ks.th/ – Notice also that the “ks” combination and the “th” ending act as separate syllables

 

Sixty
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SIH-ks-tee//ˈsɪ.ks.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” sound acts as a separate syllable

 

Sixty-Six
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “i” is short, and the final “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/sih-ks-tee-SIH-ks//sɪ.ks.tiː.ˈsɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and the that both “ks” sounds act as separate syllables

 

Size
– For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/saiz//saiːz/

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter S ) –


Jump To…

Aa . Bb . Cc . Dd . Ee . Ff . Gg . Hh . Ii . Jj . Kk . Ll . Mm . Nn . Oo . Pp . Qq . Rr . Ss . Tt . Uu . Vv . Ww . Xx . Yy . Zz
Numbers

 


 

Explore GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!

Leave a Reply

Yo!