– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter S:  Sp ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Sp

 

Sa . Sc . Se . Sh . Si . Sk . Sl . Sm . Sn . So . Sq . St . Su . Sw . Sy

Space
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/spays//speiːs/

 

Spacial
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPAY-shəl//ˈspeiː.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spain
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/spayn//speiːn/

 

Spam
– For this word, the “a” is short

/spæm//spæm/

 

Span
– For this word, the “a” is short

/spæn//spæn/

 

Spanish
– For this word, the “a” is short, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPæ-nihsh//ˈspæ.nə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spank
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/spæng-[k]//spæŋ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Spanking
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPæNG-king//ˈspæŋ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Spanning
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPæ-ning//ˈspæ.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spare
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/spayr//speɪɹ/

 

Sparse
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “e” is silent

/spahr-s//spɑɹ.s/ – Notice also that the second “s” acts as a second syllable

 

Sparsely
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPAHR-slee//ˈspɑɹ.sliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spawn
– For this word, the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/spawn//spɔn/

 

Spawned
– For this word, the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/spawn-[d]//spɔn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Speak
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “k” is (sometimes) stopped

/spee-[k]//spiː.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Speaker
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPEE-k’r//ˈspiː.kɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Speaking
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPEE-king//ˈspiː.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Special
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/SPEH-shəl//ˈspɛ.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Specialist
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPEH-shəl-ihs-[t]//ˈspɛ.ʃəl.ə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Specialize
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/SPEH-shəl-aiz//ˈspɛ.ʃəl.aiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Specialized
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/SPEH-shəl-aiz-[d]//ˈspɛ.ʃəl.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Specializes
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” combines with the “-es” ending, then second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/SPEH-shəl-ai-zihz//ˈspɛ.ʃəl.aiː.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Specializing
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the “e” is dropped, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/SPEH-shəl-ai-zing//ˈspɛ.ʃəl.aiːz.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Specially
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and final “l” of the root-word combines with the “-ly” suffix, then the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/SPEH-shə-lee//ˈspɛ.ʃə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Specific
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “c” is soft, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/spə-SIH-fih[k]//spə.ˈsɪ.fə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Specifically
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “c” is soft, the first “i” is short, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/spə-SIH-fihk-lee//spə.ˈsɪ.fə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Spectacular
– For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the first “c” is hard, the “a” is short, the second “c” is also hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ar” suffix – the “a” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/spehk-TæK-you-l’r//spɛk.ˈtæk.ju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Speech
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/spee-ch//spiː.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Speeches
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/spee-chihz//spiː.tʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Speed
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/spee[d]//spiː[d]/

 

Speeding
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPEE-ding//ˈspiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spell
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/spehl//sɛl/

 

Spelling
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/spehl//ˈsɛl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spells
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/spehl-z//spɛl.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Spend
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/spehn-[d]//spɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Spice
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/spighs//spʌiːs/

 

Spicy
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SPIGH-see//ˈspʌiː.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spider
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “e” disappears

/SPIGH-d’r//ˈspʌiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spike
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/s-bighk//sbʌiːk/

 

Spin
– For this word, the “i” is short

/spihn//spɪn/

 

Spinach
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/SPIHN-ihch//ˈspɪn.ə(ɪ)tʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spinning
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPIH-ning//ˈspɪ.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spiral
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPIGH-rəl//ˈspʌiː.ɹəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spiraling
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPIGH-rə-lihŋ//ˈspʌiː.ɹəl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spirit
– For this word, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/SPEER-ih[t]//ˈspiː.ɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spiritual
– For this word, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPEER-ih-chəl//ˈspiː.ɹə(ɪ).tʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spite
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/spigh[t]//spʌiː[t]/

 

Splash
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/splæ-sh//splæ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” combination acts as a second syllable

 

Split
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/splih[t]//splɪ[t]/

 

Splurge
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/spl’r-dʒ//spləɹ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Spoil
– For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” / phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/SPOY-yəl//ˈspoiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spoke
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “k” is (sometimes) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/spoh-k//spo.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Spoken
– For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPOH-kihn//ˈspo.kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sponsor
– For this word, the first “o” is short, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPAHN-s’r//ˈspɑn.sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sponsors
– For this word, the first “o” is short, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SPAHN-s’rz//ˈspɑn.sɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spontaneity
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/spahn-tih-NAY-ih-dee//spɑn.tə(ɪ).ˈneiː.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Spontaneous
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is long, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/spahn-TAY-nee-ihs//spɑn.teiː.niː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Spoon
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/spoon//spun/

 

Sport
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the “t” is (often) stopped

/spohr-[t]//spoɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Sports
– For this word, the “o” is long

/spohr-ts//spoɹ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Sporty
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SPOHR-dee//ˈspoɹ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Spot
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/spah[t]//spɑ[t]/ –

 

Spotted
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single “flap-t” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/SPAH-dih[d]//ˈspɑ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Spray
– For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-pray//s.pɹe/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

 

Spread
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/s-preh-[d]//s.pɹɛ.[d]/ – Notice also that the “S” and the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllable

 

Spreading
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-PREH-ding//ˈs.pɹɛ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Spring
– For this word, the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-pring//s.pɹɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter S ) –


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