– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter S:  St ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

St

 

Sa . Sc . Se . Sh . Si . Sk . Sl . Sm . Sn . So . Sp . Sq . Su . Sw . Sy

Stability
– For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the
final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-tuh-BIH-lih-dee//s.ˈtə(ʌ).ɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stabilization
– For this word, the first “a” is a True Long “A”, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is long, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-tay-bəl-aiz-AY-shihn//s.te.bəl.aiːz.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fifth syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stabilize
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAY-bih-laiz//s.ˈte.bə(ɪ).laiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stabilized
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAY-bəl-aiz-[d]//s.ˈte.bəl.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Stable
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/s-TAY-bəl//s.ˈte.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stack
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” but at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tæ[k]//s.tæ[k]/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “k” ending (when not stopped) act as a separate syllables

 

Stacked
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) – however the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” pronounced like the letter “t” silent)

/s-tæ[k]-t//s.tæ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “t” ending act as a separate syllables

 

Stadium
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “u” is a u-schwa

/s-TAY-dee-uhm//s.ˈte.ɾiː.ə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Staff
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tæf//s.taf/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stage
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tay-dʒ//s.teiː.dʒ/ – Notice also the “s” & the soft “g” ending act as a separate syllables

 

Stagnate
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-[G]-nay[t]//s.ˈtæg.ne[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Stagnated
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-[G]-nay-dih[d]//s.ˈtæg.neiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stair
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/s-tayr//s.teɪɹ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stake
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “k” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tay[k]//s.te[k]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Staked
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/s-tay[k]-t//s.te[k].t/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “t” ending act as a separate syllables

 

Stall
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tawl//s.tɔl/ – and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

 

Stalled
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/s-tawl-[d]//s.tɔl.[d]/ – Notice also that the “s” & “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Stale
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/s-TAY-ihl//s.ˈte.ɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stalemate
– For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), the first “e” is silent, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/s-TAYL-may[t]//s.ˈteɪl.meiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stamp
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/s-tæm-[p]//s.tæm.[p]/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “p” ending (when not stopped) act as a separate syllables

 

Stand
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/s-tæn-[d]//s.tæn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as a second syllables

 

Standard
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” disappears, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/s-TæN-d’r-[d]//s.ˈtæn.dɚ.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Stapler
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, there is a true-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent

/STAY-pə-l’r//ˈste.pə.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Staples
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, there is a true-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/STAY-pəl-z//ˈste.pəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Star
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/s-tahr//s.tɑɹ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stare
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/s-tayr//s.teɪɹ/ – Notice also thatand that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Start
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/s-tahr-[t]//s.tɑɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as a separate syllables

 

Starter
For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAHR-d’r//s.ˈtɑɹ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stark
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “k” is (sometimes) stopped

/s-tahr-[k]//s.tɑɹ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “s” and the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

State
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tay[t]//s.te[t]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Statement
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is (usually) stopped, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAY[T]-mihn-[t]//s.ˈte[t].mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as a separate syllables

 

Statesman
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “e” is silent, and for the “-man” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAY-ts-mihn//s.ˈte.ts.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “ts” combination act as a separate syllables

 

Static
– For this word, the “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is
(often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s--dih[k]//s.ˈtæ.də(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stating
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAY-ding//s.ˈte.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Station
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAY-shihn//s.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Statistician
– For this word, the “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

/s--dihs-TIH-shihn//s.ˌtæ.ɾə(ɪ)s.ˈtɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress is on the second syllable, that the major stress is on the fourth syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Statistics
– For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard

/s-tuh-TIHS-tih-ks//s.tə(ʌ).ˈtɪs.tɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “s” & the “ks” ending act as a separate syllables

 

Statue
– For this word, the “a” is short, the second “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), and the “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/s--chyoo//sˈtæ.tʃju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Statuette
– For this word, the “a” is short, the second “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the first “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tæ-chyou-EH[T]//s.tæ.tʃju.ɛ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Status
– For this word, the “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

/s--dihs//ˈstæ.ɾ(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stay
– For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tay//s.teiː/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Steadily
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is a true-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TEH-də-lee//s.tɛˈɾə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Steady
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/s-DEH-dee//s.ˈdɛ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Steak
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/s-tay-k//s.teiː.k/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “k” ending act as separate syllables

 

Steal
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/s-teel//s.tiːl/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Steam
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/s-teem//s.tiːm/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Steel
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-teel//s.tiːl/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Steep
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and that the final “p” is (often) stopped

/s-tee[p]//s.tiː[p]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Steer
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-teer//s.tiːɹ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stellar
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “a” disappears

/s-TEH-l’r//s.ˈtɛ.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Step
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/s-teh[p]//s.tɛ[p]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stereotype
– For this word, the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” is long, the “o” is long, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/s-TAYR-ee-oh-tigh-[p]//s.ˈteɪɹ.iː.o.tʌiː.[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “p” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Stereotypes
– For this word, the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” is long, the “o” is long, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the third “e” is silent

/s-TAYR-ee-oh-tigh-ps//s.ˈteɪɹ.iː.o.tʌiː.ps/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the first “s” & the “ps” ending act as separate syllables

 

Stern
– For this word, the “e” disappears

/s-t’rn//s.tɚn/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stew
– For this word, and the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/s-too//s.tu/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stick
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – but at the end of a word, is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tih[k]//s.tɪ[k]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Sticker
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix, the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tih-k’r//s.tɪ.kɚ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stickler
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – and the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TIHK-l’r//s.ˈtɪk.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stiff
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tihf//s.tɪf/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stifle
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “f” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/s-TIGH-fəl//s.ˈtʌiː.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stilettos
– For this word, the “i” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the single flap-t, the “o” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/s-tə-LEH-dohz//s.tə.ˈlɛ.ɾoz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Still
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tihl//s.tɪl/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stimulate
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TIHM-you-lay[t]//s.ˈtɪm.ju.le[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stimulus
– For this word, the “i” is short, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the second “u” turns into an i-schwa

/s-TIHM-you-lihs//s.ˈtɪm.ju.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Sting
– For this word, the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-ting//s.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stir
– For this word, the “i” disappears

/s-t’r//s.tɚ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stock
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tahk//s.tɑk/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stocks
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tah-ks//s.tɑ.ks/ – Notice also that the “s” and the “ks” ending act as a separate syllables

 

Stodgy
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/s-TAH-dʒee//s.ˈtɑ.dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stoic
– For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TOH-ihk//s.ˈto.ə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stoically
– For this word, the “o” is long, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-TOH-ihk-lee//s.ˈto.ə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stoicism
– For this word, the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is soft, and for the “ism” suffix – the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TOH-ih-sih-zəm//s.ˈto.ə(ɪ).sɪ.zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stole
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tohl//s.tol/ – and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

 

Stolen
–For this word, the “o” is long, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/s-TOH-lihn//s.ˈto-lə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stomach
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”

/s-TUH-mihk//s.ˈtʌ.mə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stone
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tohn//s.ton/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stop
– For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/s-tah[p]//s.tɑ[p]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stops
– For this word, the “o” is short

/s-tah-ps//s.tɑ.ps/ – Notice also that the first “s” and the “ps” ending act as a separate syllables

 

Stopped
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/s-tah[p]-t//s.tɑ[p].t/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “t” ending act as separate syllables

 

Store
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tohr//s.toɹ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stored
– For this word, the “o” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r”– the “e” is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/s-tohr-[d]//s.toɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “s” and the “d” ending act as separate syllables

 

Storm
– For this word, the “o” is long

/s-tohr-m//s.toɹ.m/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “m” ending act as separate syllables

 

Story
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/s-TOHR-ee//s.ˈtoɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stove
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tohv//s.tov/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Straight
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “gh” combination is silent, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/s-chray[t]//s.tʃɹeiː[t]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Strain
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/s-chrayn//s.tʃɹeiːn/ – Notice also that and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Strange
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/s-trayn-dʒ//s.tʃɹeiːn.dʒ/ – Notice also that the “s” & the soft “g” ending act as separate syllables

 

Strangely
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRAYN-dʒ-lee//s.ˈtʃɹeiːn.dʒ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the soft “g” act as separate syllables

 

Stranger
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRAYN-dʒ’r//s.ˈtʃɹeiːn.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Strategic
– For this word, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-chruh-TEE-dʒihk//s.tʃɹə(ʌ).ˈtiː.dʒə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Strategies
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/s-CHRæ-dih-dʒee-z//s.ˈtʃɹæ.ɾə(ɪ).dʒiː.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the first “s” & the “z” ending act as separate syllables

 

Strategy
– For this word, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/s-CHRæ-dih-dʒee//s.ˈtʃɹæ.ɾə(ɪ).dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Strawberry
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/s-CHRAW-bayr-ee//s.ˈtʃɹɔ.beɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stream
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/s-chreem//s.tʃɹiːm/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Streamlined
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “i” is long, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “final “d” is (often) stopped

/s-CHREEM-lain-[d]//s.ˈtʃɹiːm.laɪn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Street
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is stopped

/s-chree[t]//s.tʃɹiː[t]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Strength
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “e” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, the “g” is pronounced like the letter “k” (this is due to the placement of the letter un-voiced “th” combination directly after it), and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/s-chrehŋ-kth//s-tʃɹɛŋ.kθ/ – Notice also that the the first “s” & the “kth” ending act as separate syllables

 

Strengthen
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “e” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, the “g” is pronounced like the letter “k” (this is due to the placement of the letter un-voiced “th” combination directly after it), the “th” combination is un-voiced, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHREHNG-k-thihn//s-tʃɹɛŋ.k.θə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the the first “s” & the “kth” ending act as separate syllables

 

Strenuous
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “e” is short, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHREHN-you-ihs//s.ˈtʃɹɛn.ju.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stress
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-chehs//s.tʃɹɛs/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stressed
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/s-chrehs-[t]//s.tʃɹɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Stressful
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard
pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHREHS-fəl//s.ˈtʃɹɛs.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stretch
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “e” is short, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-chreh-ch//s.tʃɹɛ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “ch” ending act as separate syllables

Stretching
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHREH-ching//s.ˈtʃɹɛ.tʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Strict
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/s-chrih[k]-[t]//s.tʃɹɪ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “t” ending (whn not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Strictly
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is almost stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRIH[K]-[t]//s.ˈtʃɹɪ[k].t.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “t” act as separate syllables

 

Strike
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “k” is (sometimes) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/s-chrigh-[k]/// – Notice also that the letter “s” & the “k” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Striking
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRIGH-king//s.ˈtʃɹʌiː.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

String
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-chring//s.tʃɹɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stringent
– For this word, The “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRIHN-dʒə(ɪ)n-[t]//s.ˈtʃɹə(ɪ)n.dʒə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Strip
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/s-chrih[p]//s.tʃɹɪ[p]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stripe
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “p” is often stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/s-chrigh[p]//ˈs.tʃɹʌiː[p]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Striped
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “p” is almost stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/s-CHRIGH[P]-t//s,ˈtɹʌiː[p].t/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “t” ending act as separate syllables

 

Strive
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/s-CHRIAV//s.ˈtʃɹaiːv/ – Notice also that the “S” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stroke
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/s-chrohk//s.tʃɹok/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stroll
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “o” is long, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-chrohl//s.tʃɹol/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Strong
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the “ing” combination

/s-chrawng//s.tʃɹɔŋ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Structural
– For this word, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the second “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRUH[K]-ch’r-əl//s.ˈtʃɹʌ[k].tʃɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Structure
– For this word, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRUH[K]-ch’r//s.ˈtʃɹʌ[k].tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Structured
– For this word, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRUHK-ch’r-[d]//s.ˈtʃɹʌk.tʃɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Struggle
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “g” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/s-CHRUH-gəl//s.ˈtʃɹʌ.gəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Struggling
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “g” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRUH-gə-ling//s.ˈtʃɹʌ.gə.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Student
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TOO-dihn-[t]//s.ˈtu.də(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Students
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TOO-dihn-ts//s.ˈtu.də(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “ts” ending act as separate syllables

 

Studied
– For this word, the “u” is short, the first “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “e”– the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/s-TUH-dee-[d]//s.ˈdʌ.ɾiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” & the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Studies
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/s-TUH-deez//s.ˈtʌ.ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Studio
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “o” is long

/s-TOO-dee-oh//s.ˈtu.ɾiː.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Study
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/s-TUH-dee//s.ˈtʌ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Studying
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TUH-dee-ying//s.ˈtʌ.ɾiː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stuff
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tuhf//s.tʌf/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stuffed
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “f” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/s-tuhf-t//s.tʌf.t/ – Notice also that the the “s” &”t” ending act as separate syllables

 

Stuffy
– For this word, the “u” is short,the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/s-TUH-fee//s.ˈtʌ.fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stunned
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/s-tuhn-[d]//s.tʌn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “s” &the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Stunt
– For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/s-tuhn[t]//s.tʌn[t]/ – Notice also that the “s” &the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Stupid
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/s-TOO-pih[d]//s.ˈtu.pə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Style
– For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” / phantom-schwa combination in-between the “y” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/s-TAI-yəl//ˈstaiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Stylish
– For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” / phantom-schwa combination in-between the “y” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAI-yəl-ihsh//s.ˈtaiː.jəl.ə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter S ) –


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Aa . Bb . Cc . Dd . Ee . Ff . Gg . Hh . Ii . Jj . Kk . Ll . Mm . Nn . Oo . Pp . Qq . Rr . Ss . Tt . Uu . Vv . Ww . Xx . Yy . Zz
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