– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter S:  Su ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Su

 

Sa . Sc . Se . Sh . Si . Sk . Sl . Sm . Sn . So . Sp . Sq . St . Sw . Sy

Subdue
– For this word, the first “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is (usually) stopped, and the second “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/suh[b]-DOO//sə(ʌ)[b].ˈdu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Subdued
– For this word, the first “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the second “u” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “u” –the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/suh[b]-DOO-[d]//sə(ʌ)[b].ˈdu.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Subject (noun)
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/SUH[B]-dʒih[k]-t//ˈsʌ[b].dʒə(ɪ)[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Subject (verb)
–For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/suh[b]-dʒEH[K]-t//sʌ[b]ˈdʒɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Subjective
–For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh[b]-dʒEH[K]-tihv//sə(ʌ)[b]ˈdʒɛ[k].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Submit
– For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/suh[b]-MIH-[t]//sʌ[b].ˈmɪ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Submitted
– For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/suh[b]-MIH-dih-[d]//sʌ[b].ˈmɪ.ɾə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Sub-Orbital
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “O” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh[b]-OHR-bih-dəl//sə(ʌ)[b].ˈoɹ.bə(ɪ).ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Subordinate
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh-BOHR-dih-nih[t]//sə(ʌ).ˈboɹ.ɾə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Subordinates
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh-BOHR-dih-nih-ts//sə(ʌ).ˈboɹ.ɾə(ɪ).nə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Subprime
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/suh[b]-praim//sʌ[b].ˈpɹaɪm/ – Notice also that there is no discernible word-stressed –

 

Sub-Saharan
– For this word, for the “Sub-” prefix – the “u” is a u-schwa, and the “b” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this prefix in The Common Tongue), the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the third “a” turns into an i-schwa

/suh[b]-suh-HAYR-ihn//ˌsə(ʌ)[b].sə(ʌ).ˈheɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Subscribe
– For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is almost stopped, the “c” is hard, the “i” is long, the “b” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/suhb-SKRAI[B]//sə(ʌ)b.ˈskɹaiː[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Subscribers
– For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is almost stopped, the “c” is hard, the “i” is long, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/suhb-SKRAI-b’r-z//sə(ʌ)b.ˈskɹaiː.bɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Subsequent
– For this word, the “u” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/SUH[B]-sih-kwihn-[t]//ˈsʌ[b].sə(ɪ).kwə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Subsequently
– For this word, the “u” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, the “t” is (usually) “stopped”, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SUHB-sih-kwehn-[t]-lee//ˈsʌ[b].sə(ɪ).kwɛn.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Subsidiaries
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the first “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/suh[b]-SIH-dee-ayr-eez//sʌ[b].ˈsɪ.ɾiː.eɪɹ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Subsidies
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SUHB-sih-deez//ˈsʌ[b].sə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Subsidize
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SUHB-sih-daiz//ˈsʌ[b].sə(ɪ).ɾaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Subsidy
– for this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SUH[B]-sih-dee//ˈsʌ[b].sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Subsistence
– For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is almost stopped, the “i” is short, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh[b]-SIHS-tihn-s//sə(ʌ)[b].ˈsɪs.tə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the final “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Substance
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SU[B]-s-tihn-s//ˈsʌ[b].s.tə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the second and third letters “s” act as separate syllables

 

Substantial
– For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is almost stopped, the first “a” is short, and for the “tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh[b]-s-TæN-shəl//sə(ʌ)[b].s.ˈtæn.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the second letter “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Substantially
– For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the first “a” is short, for the “-tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combiantion, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “l” combines with the “-ly” suffix and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh[b]-s-TæN-shə-lee//sə(ʌ)[b].s.ˈtæn.sə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Substitute
– For this word, the first “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “u” is long, the third “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/SUH[B]-stih-too[t]//ˈsʌb.stə(ɪ).tu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Substituted
– For this word, the first “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “u” is long, the third “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/SUHB-stih-too-dih[d]//ˈsʌb.stə(ɪ).tu.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Suburb
– For this word, the first “u” is a u-schwa, the second “u” disappears, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/suh-B’R-[b]//sə(ʌ).ˈbɚ.[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Suburban
– For this word, the first “u” is a u-schwa, the second “u” disappears, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/suh-B’R-bihn//sə(ʌ).ˈbɚ.bə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Succeed
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the first “c” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “c” is soft, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/suh[k]-SEE[D]//sə(ʌ)[k].ˈsiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Succeeded
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the first “c” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “c” is soft, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/suh[k]-SEE-dih[d]//sə(ʌ)[k].ˈsiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Success
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the first “c” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “c” is soft, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/suh[k]-SEHS//sə(ʌ)[k].ˈsɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Successful
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the first “c” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “c” is soft, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh[k]-SEHS-f’əl//sə(ʌ)[k].ˈsɛs.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Successfully
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “c” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “c” is soft, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-fully” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə[k]-SEHS-fəl-lee//sə[k].ˈsɛs.fəl.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Succinct
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “c”, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “c” directly after it), and the third “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/sə-SING[K]-t//sə.ˈsɪŋ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Succinctly
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “c”, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “c” directly after it), the third “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-SING[K]-[t]-lee//sə.ˈsɪŋ[k].[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the letter “t” (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Succumb
– For this word, the first “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the second “u” is short, and the final “b” is silent

/sə-KUHM//sə.ˈkʌm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Succumbed
– For this word, the first “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the second “u” is short, the “b” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/sə-KUHM-[d]//sə.ˈkʌm.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Succumbing
– For this word, the first “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the second “u” is short, the “b” is silent, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-KUH-ming//sə.ˈkʌ.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Such
– For this word, the “u” is short

/suhch//sʌtʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Suck
– For this word, the “u” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – however, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/suh[k]//sʌ[k]/

 

Sudden
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/SUH-dihn//ˈsʌ.ɾə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Suddenly
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) – However, here is is (usually) stopped, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SUH-[d]ihn-lee//ˈsʌ.[ɾ]ə(ɪ)n.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sue
– For this word, the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/soo//su/

 

Sued
– For this word, the “u” is long, and the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “u” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/soo-[d]//su.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Suffer
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/SUH-f’r//ˈsʌ.fɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Suffering
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SUH-f’r-ing//ˈsʌ.fɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Suffers
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SUH-f’rz//ˈsʌ.fɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Suffice
 – For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ice” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh-FIGHS//sə(ʌ).ˈfʌiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Sufficient
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sə-FIH-shihn-[t]//səˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.[t] / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Sufficiently
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-FIH-shihn-[t]-lee//səˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.[t].liː / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

 

Sugar
– For this word, the “S” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” turns into a true-schwa / Short “I” combination (like in the word “foot” or “put”), the “g” is hard, and the “a” disappears

/SHəih-g’r//ˈʃəɪ.gɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Suggest
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the second “g” is soft, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sə[g]-dʒEHS-[t]//sə[g].ˈdʒɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Suggestable
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the second “g” is soft, the “e” is short, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə[g]-dʒEHS-tuh-bəl//sə[g].ˈdʒɛs.tə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Suggests
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the second “g” is soft, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sə[g]-dʒEHS-ts//sə[g].ˈdʒɛs.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Suggestion
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the second “g” is soft, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “s” directly before it), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə[g]-dʒEHS-chihn//sə[g].ˈdʒɛs.tʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Suggestions
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the first “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the second “g” is soft, the “e” is short, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination sounds like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “s” directly before it), the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/suh[g]-dʒEHS-chihn-z//sə(ʌ)[g].ˈdʒɛs.tʃən.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Suit
– For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/soo[t]//su[t]/

 

Suitable
– For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SOO-duh-bəl//ˈsu.ɾə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Suitcase
– For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/SOO[T]-kays//ˈsu[t].keiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Suite
– For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced like a letter “w” / long “e” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/swee[t]//swiː[t]/

 

Suited
– For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/SOO-dih-[d]//ˈsu.ɾə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Suits
– For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/soo-ts//su.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Sum
– For this word, the “u” is short

/suhm//sʌm/

 

Summarize
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SUH-muh-raiz//ˈsʌ.mə(ʌ).ɹaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Summary
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SUH-m’r-ee//ˈsʌ.mɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Summer
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/SUH-m’r//ˈsʌ.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sun
– For this word, the “u” is short

/suhn//sʌn/

 

Sun-Bathing
– For this compound-word, the “u” is short, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “th” is voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SUHN-bay-thing//ˈsʌn.beiː.ðɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sun-Burnt
– For this compound-word, the first “u” is short, the second “u” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/SUHN-b’rn-[t]//ˈsʌn.bɚn.[t] / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Sunday
– For this word, the “u” is short, and for the “-day” suffix – the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SUHN-day//ˈsʌn.deiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sunk
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/sung-k//sʌŋ.k/

 

Sunny
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SUH-nee//ˈsʌ.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Sunset
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/SUHN-seh[t]//ˈsʌn.sɛt/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Super
– For this word, the “u” is long, and the “e” disappears

/SOO-p’r//ˈsu.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Superficial
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “e” disappears, the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/soo-p’r-FIH-shəl//ˌsu.pɚ.ˈfɪ.ʃəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Superior
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-PEER-ee-y’r//sə.ˈpiːɹ.iː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Supermarket
– For this word, the “u” is long, the first “e” disappears, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/SOO-p’r-mahr-kih[t]//ˈsu.pɚ.mɑɹ.kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Supersede
– For this word, the “u” is long, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/soo-p’r-SEE-[d]//ˌsu.pɚˈsiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Superstar
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “e” disappears, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/SOO-p’r-s-tahr//ˈsu.pɚ.s.tɑɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the second letter “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Superstition
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “e” disappears, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/soo-p’r-s-TIH-shihn//ˌsu.pɚ.s.ˈtɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the major stress is on the third syllable and that the second letter “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Supervisor
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “e” disappears, the “i” is long, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SOO-p’r-vai-z’r//ˈsu.pɚ.vaiː.zɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Supervisors
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “e” disappears, the “i” is long, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SOO-p’r-vai-z’r-z//ˈsu.pɚ.vaiː.zɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Supplement
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the
final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SUH-plə-mihn-[t]//ˈsʌ.plə.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Supplementary
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “a” disappears, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/suhp-lə-MEHN-tə-ree//sʌ.plə.ˈmɛn.tɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Supply
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i” (this is not pronounced as an “-ly” suffix)

/suh-PLAI//sə(ʌ).ˈplaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Support
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/suh-POHR-[t]//sə(ʌ).ˈpoɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Supporter
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh-POHR-d’r//sə(ʌ).ˈpoɹ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Supportive
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh-POHR-dihv//sə(ʌ).ˈpoɹ.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Supportively
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh-POHR-dihv-lee//sə(ʌ).ˈpoɹ.ɾə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Suppose
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/suh-POHZ//sʌ.ˈpoz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Supposedly
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh-POH-zih[d]-lee//sʌ.ˈpo.zə(ɪ)[d].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Sure
– For this word, the “S” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/sh’r//ʃɚ/

 

Sure-Fire
– For this term, the “S” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, the first “e” is silent, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/SH’R-figh-y’r//ˈʃɚ.fʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Surely
– For this word, the “S” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SH’R-lee//ˈʃɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Surf
– For this word, the “u” disappears

/s’rf//sɚf/

 

Surfer
– For this word, the “u” disappears, and the “e” disappears

/S’R-f’r//ˈsɚ.fɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Surfs
– For this word, the “u” disappears

/s’r-fs//sɚ.fs/ – Notice also that the “fs” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Surface
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent

/S’R-fihs//ˈsɚ.fə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Surge
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/s’r-dʒ//sɚ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft letter “g” acts a second syllable

 

Surgeon
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “g” is soft, and the “eo” combination turns into an i-schwa

/S’R-dʒihn//sɚ.dʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Surgery
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “g” is soft, the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/S’R-dʒ’r-ee//ˈsɚ.dʒɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Surname
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/S’R-naym//ˈsɚ.neiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Surpass
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “a” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s’r-PæS//sɚ.ˈpæs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Surpassed
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (sometimes) stopped

/s’r-PæS-[t]//sɚ.ˈpæs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Surplus
– For this word, the first “u” disappears, and the second “u” turns into an i-schwa

/S’R-plihs//ˈsɚ.plə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Surprise
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “r” is almost silent, the “i” is long, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/sə[r]-PRAIZ//sə[ɹ].ˈpɹaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Surprised
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “r” is almost silent, the “i” is long, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /sə[r]-PRAIZ-[d]/ – /sə[ɹ].ˈpɹaiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Surprising
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “r” is almost silent, the first “i” is long, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix)

/sə[r]-PRAI-zing//sə[ɹ].ˈpɹaiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Surprisingly
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “r” is almost silent, the first “i” is long, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə[r]-PRAI-zing-lee//sə[ɹ].ˈpɹaiː.zɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Surround
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/s’r-OWN-[d]//sɚ.ˈɑun.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Surrounding
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s’r-OWN-ding//sɚ.ˈɑun.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Surroundings
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/s’r-OWN-ding-z//sɚ.ˈɑun.dɪŋ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Surveillance
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s’r-VAY-lihn-s//sɚ.ˈveiː.lə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Survey
– For this word, the “u” disappears, and the “ey” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/S’R-vay//ˈsɚ.veiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Surveyed
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “ey” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “a” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/S’R-vay[d]//ˈsɚ.veiː[d] / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Surveys
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “ey” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/S’R-vayz//ˈsɚ.veiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Survival
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “i” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s’r-VAI-vəl//sɚ.ˈvaiː.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Survive
– For this word, the “u” disappears, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/s’r-VAIV//sɚ.ˈvaiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Susceptible
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “sc” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (the “c” is silent), the “e” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/sə-SEH[P]-tih-bəl//sə.sɛ[p].tə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Suspect (noun)
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/SUHS-peh[k]-[t]//ˈsʌs.pɛ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Suspect (verb)
– For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/suhs-PEH[K]-[t]//sə(ʌ)s.ˈpɛ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Suspense
– For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the first “e” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/suhs-PEHN-s//sə(ʌ)s.ˈpɛn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Suspicion
– For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/suh-SPIH-shihn//sə(ʌ).ˈspɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Suspicious
– For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suhs-PIH-shihs//sə(ʌ)sˈpɪ.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Sussex
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/SUH-sih-ks//ˈsʌ.sə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Sustainability
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-ability” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is
pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/səs-tayn-ə-BIH-lih-dee//səs.ˌteiːnə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ). ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

 

Sustainable
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to
the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/səs-TAYN-uh-bəl//səs.teiː.nə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter S ) –


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