– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter S ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Ss

 

Sa – Sm . Sn . So . Sp . Squ . St . Su . Sw . Sy

Sn

Snack
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of The Common Tongue)

– /snæk/ – /snæk/ –

Snake
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

– /snayk//sneiːk/

Snatch
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/snæ-ch//snæ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “tch” ending acts as a second syllable

Snore
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/snohr//snoɹ/

Snoring
– For this word, the “o” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SNOHR-ing//ˈsnoɹ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Snorkeling
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SNOHR-kə-ling//ˈsnoɹ.kə.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Snow
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation)

/snoh//sno/

Snowing
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SNOH-wing/ – /ˈsno.wɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Snow-Mobile
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation), the second “o” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “e” is silent

/SNOH-moh-beel//ˈsno.mo.biːl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Snowy
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “w” is pronounced normally (it is not pronounced in combination with the letter “o”), and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SNOH-wee//ˈsno.wiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

So

So
 – For this word, the “o” is long

/soh//so/

Soap
 – For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/soh[p]/ – /so[p]/ –

Soar
 – For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/sohr//soɹ/

Soared
 – For this word, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/sohr-[d]//soɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Soccer
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced like the single hard letter “c”, and the “e” disappears

– /SAH-k’r//ˈsɑ.kɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sociability
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “-ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and for the “-ability” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/soh-shuh-BIH-lih-dee//ˌso.ʃə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Sociable
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l”, and the “e” is silent

– /SOH-shuh-bəl//ˈso.ʃə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Social
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SOH-shəl//ˈso.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Socialize
 – For this word, the “o” is long, for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SOH-shəl-aiz//ˈso.ʃəl.aiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Societal
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “i” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /sə-SAI-eh-dəl//sə(ʌ).ˈsaiː.ə(ɪ).ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Society
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “i” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /sə-SAI-eh-dee//sə(ʌ).ˈsaiː.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Sock
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” but, when at the end of a word, is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/sah[k]//sɑ[k]/

Soft
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sawf-[t]//sɔf.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Softly
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAWF-[t]-lee//ˈsɔf.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Software
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like an “aw” combination, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /SAWF-[t]-wayr/ – /ˈsɔf.[t].weɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Soil
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, and there is a phantom consonant letter “y” / phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/SOY-yəl//ˈsoiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Solar
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the “a” disappears

/SOH-l’r//ˈso.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Soldier
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the sound of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “ei” combination disappears

/SOHL-dʒ’r//ˈsol.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Solicit
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/suh-LIH-sih-[t]//sə(ʌ).ˈlɪ.sə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Solicitor
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “c” is soft, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-LIH-sih-d’r/ – /sə.lɪ.sə(ɪ).ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Solid
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/SAH-lih[d]//ˈsɑ.lə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Solo
 – For this word, the first “o” is long, and the second “o” is long

/SOH-loh/ – /ˈso.lo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Soloist
 – For this word, the first “o” is long, the second “o” is long, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “o” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ist” suffix – and the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SOH-loh-ihs-[t]/ – /ˈso.lo.ə(ɪ)s.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “t” (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Solution
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “u” is long, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-LOO-shihn//sə.ˈlu.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Solve
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/sawl-v//sawl.v/ – Notice also that the “v” ending acts as a second syllable

Solvency
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SAWL-vihn-see//ˈsɔl.və(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Some
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/suhm//sʌm/ – Notice also that –

Somebody
 – For this word, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “e” is silent, the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SUHM-buh-dee//ˈsʌm.bə(ʌ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Somehow
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “e” is silent, the “h” is pronounced, and the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/SUHM-how//ˈsʌm.hɑw/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Someone
 – For this word, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “e” is silent, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “e” and the second “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the second “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/SUHM-wuhn//ˈsʌm.wə(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Somerset
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/SUH-m’r-seh[t]//ˈsʌ.mɚ.sɛ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Something
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “e” is silent, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SUHM-thing//ˈsʌm.θɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sometimes
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the first “e” is silent, the “i” is long, the second “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SUHM-taim-z//ˈsʌm.taiːm.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Somewhat
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “e” is silent, the “wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “w” (the “h” is silent) (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “t” is often stopped

/SUHM-wuh[t]//ˈsʌm.wə(ʌ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Son
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”

– /suhn//sʌn/

Song
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “ring”, rang” or “rung” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/sawng//sɔŋ/

Soon
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/soon//sun/

Sooner
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this
suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SOO-n’r//ˈsu.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Soothe
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “th” combination is voiced, and the final “e” is silent

/sooth//suð/

Soothing
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “th” combination is voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SOO-thing//ˈsu.ðɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Soprano
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, and the last “o” is long

– /sə-PRæ-noh//sə.pɹæ.no/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sore
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/sohr//soɹ/

Sorry
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SAW-ree//ˈsɔ.ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sort
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sohr-[t]//soɹ.[t]/

Sought
 – For this word, the “ough” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/saw-[t]/ – /sɔ[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Soul
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o”

/sohl//sol/

Sound
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/sown-[d]//sɑun.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Soup
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/soo[p]/ – /su[p]/ –

Sour
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the letter “u” and the letter “r”

– /SOW-w’r//ˈsau.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Source
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/sohr-s//soɹ.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

Sourcing
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, the “c” is soft, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SOHR-sing/ – /ˈsoɹ.sɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

South
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “th” is un-voiced

– /sowth//sauθ/

Southeast
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “th” is un-voiced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sowth-EES.[t]//sauθ.iːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Southern
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “th” combination is voiced, the “e” disappears

/SUH-th’rn//ˈsʌ.ðɚn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sozopol
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is long, and the final “o” turns into a true-schwa

/sə-ZOH-pəl/ – /səˈzo.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Sp

Space
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/spays//speiːs/

Spacial
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-cial” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPAY-shəl//ˈspeiː.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spain
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/spayn//speiːn/

Spam
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/spæm//spæm/

Span
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/spæn//spæn/

Spanish
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPæ-nihsh//ˈspæ.nə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spank
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/spæng-[k]/ – /spæŋ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Spanking
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPæNG-king/ – /ˈspæŋ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Spanning
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPæ-ning//ˈspæ.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Spare
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/spayr//speɪɹ/

Sparse
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “e” is silent

/spahr-s//spɑɹ.s/ – Notice also that the second “s” acts as a second syllable –

Sparsely
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPAHR-slee//ˈspɑɹ.sliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spawn
 – For this word, the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /spawn//spɔn/

Spawned
 – For this word, the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /spawn-[d]//spɔn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Speak
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “k” is (sometimes) stopped

/spee-[k]//spiː.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Speaker
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPEE-k’r//ˈspiː.kɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Speaking
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPEE-king//ˈspiː.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Special
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

– /SPEH-shəl//ˈspɛ.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Specialist
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the  and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPEH-shəl-ihs-[t]//ˈspɛ.ʃəl.ə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Specialize
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /SPEH-shəl-aiz//ˈspɛ.ʃəl.aiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Specialized
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

– /SPEH-shəl-aiz-[d]//ˈspɛ.ʃəl.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Specializes
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” combines with the “-es” ending, then second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

– /SPEH-shəl-ai-zihz//ˈspɛ.ʃəl.aiː.zə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Specializing
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the “e” is dropped, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

– /SPEH-shəl-ai-zing/ – /ˈspɛ.ʃəl.aiːz.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Specially
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and final “l” of the root-word combines with the “-ly” suffix, then the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/SPEH-shə-lee//ˈspɛ.ʃə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Specific
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “c” is soft, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /spə-SIH-fih[k]//spə.ˈsɪ.fə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Specifically
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the first “c” is soft, the first “i” is short, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

– /spə-SIH-fihk-lee//spə.ˈsɪ.fə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Spectacular
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the first “c” is hard, the “a” is short, the second “c” is also hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ar” suffix – the “a” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/spehk-TæK-you-l’r//spɛk.ˈtæk.ju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Speech
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/spee-ch//spiː.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Speeches
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/spee-chihz//spiː.tʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Speed
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/spee[d]//spiː[d]/

Speeding
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPEE-ding//ˈspiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spell
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/spehl//sɛl/

Spelling
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/spehl//ˈsɛl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spend
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/spehn-[d]//spɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Spice
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/spighs//spʌiːs/

Spicy
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SPIGH-see//ˈspʌiː.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spider
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “e” disappears

/SPIGH-d’r//ˈspʌiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spike
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/s-bighk/ – /sbʌiːk/ –

Spin
– For this word, the “i” is short

/spihn//spɪn/

Spinach
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /SPIHN-ihch//ˈspɪn.ə(ɪ)tʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spinning
– For this word, the first “i” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPIH-ning//ˈspɪ.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spiral
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SPIGH-rəl//ˈspʌiː.ɹəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spiraling
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SPIGH-rə-lihŋ//ˈspʌiː.ɹəl.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spirit
 – For this word, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/SPEER-ih[t]//ˈspiː.ɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spiritual
 – For this word, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPEER-ih-chəl//ˈspiː.ɹə(ɪ).tʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spite
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/spigh[t]//spʌiː[t]/

Splash
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/splæ-sh//splæ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” combination acts as a second syllable

Split
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /splih[t]//splɪ[t]/

Splurge
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /spl’r-dʒ//spləɹ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” ending acts as a second syllable

Spoil
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” / phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/SPOY-yəl//ˈspoiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spoke
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “k” is (sometimes) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /spoh-k//spo.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Spoken
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPOH-kihn//ˈspo.kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sponsor
 – For this word, the first “o” is short, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SPAHN-s’r/ – /ˈspɑn.sɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sponsors
 – For this word, the first “o” is short, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SPAHN-s’rz/ – /ˈspɑn.sɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spontaneity
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/spahn-tih-NAY-ih-dee//spɑn.tə(ɪ).ˈneiː.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Spontaneous
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is long, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /spahn-TAY-nee-ihs//spɑn.teiː.niː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Spoon
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/spoon//spun/

Sport
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the “t” is (often) stopped

– /spohr-[t]/ – /spoɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable 

Sports
 – For this word, the “o” is long

/spohr-ts/ – /spoɹ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Spot
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /spah[t]/ – /spɑ[t]/ –

Spotted
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single “flap-t” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “t”  – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /SPAH-dih[d]/ – /ˈspɑ.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Spray
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-pray//s.pɹe/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Spread
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/s-preh-[d]//s.pɹɛ.[d]/ – Notice also that the “S” and the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllablese –

Spreading
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /s-PREH-ding//ˈs.pɹɛ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Spring
 – For this word, the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-pring//s.pɹɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Squ

Squad
 – For this word, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/s-kwaw[d]//s.kwɔɾ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts like a separate syllable

Square
 – For this word, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/s-kwayr//s.kweɪɹ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Squash
 – For this word, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “sh” combination is un-voiced

– /s-kwa-sh//s.kwɔ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “sh” combination act as separate syllables –

Squeeze
 – For this word, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/s-kweez//s.kwiːz/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Squeezed
 – For this word, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/s-kweez-[d]/ – /s.kwiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Squid
 – For this word, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/s-kwih-[d]//s.kwɪ.[d]/ – Notice also that the “s” and the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Squirrel
 – For this word, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/s-KW’R-əl//s.kwɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable and that the primary stress is on the first syllable

St

Stability
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the
final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-tuh-BIH-lih-dee//s.ˈtə(ʌ).ɪ.lə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stabilization
 – For this word, the first “a” is a True Long “A”, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is long, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-tay-bəl-aiz-AY-shihn/ – /s.te.bəl.aiːz.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fifth syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stabilize
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAY-bih-laiz/ – /s.ˈte.bə(ɪ).laiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stabilized
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the first “i” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAY-bəl-aiz-[d]//s.ˈte.bəl.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Stable
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/s-TAY-bəl/ – /s.ˈte.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stack
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” but at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /s-tæ[k]//s.tæ[k]/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “k” ending (when not stopped) act as a separate syllables –

Stacked
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) – however the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” pronounced like the letter “t” silent)

– /s-tæ[k]-t//s.tæ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “t” ending act as a separate syllables –

Stadium
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “u” is a u-schwa

/s-TAY-dee-uhm/ – /s.ˈte.ɾiː.ə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Staff
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tæf/ – /s.taf/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stage
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tay-dʒ//s.teiː.dʒ/ – Notice also the “s” & the soft “g” ending act as a separate syllables –

Stagnate
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-[G]-nay[t]//s.ˈtæg.ne[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Stagnated
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-[G]-nay-dih[d]//s.ˈtæg.neiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stair
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/s-tayr//s.teɪɹ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stake
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “k” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /s-tay[k]//s.te[k]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Staked
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /s-tay[k]-t//s.te[k].t/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “t” ending act as a separate syllables –

Stall
 – For this word, the  “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tawl/ – /s.tɔl/ – and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stalled
 – For this word, the  “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/s-tawl-[d]/ – /s.tɔl.[d]/ – Notice also that the “s” & “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Stale
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/s-TAY-ihl//s.ˈte.ɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stalemate
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), the first “e” is silent, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/s-TAYL-may[t]/ – /s.ˈteɪl.meiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stamp
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/s-tæm-[p]//s.tæm.[p]/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “p” ending (when not stopped) act as a separate syllables –

Stand
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/s-tæn-[d]//s.tæn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as a second syllables –

Standard
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” disappears, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/s-TæN-d’r-[d]/ – /s.ˈtæn.dɚ.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Stapler
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, there is a true-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent

/STAY-pə-l’r//ˈste.pə.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Staples
– For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, there is a true-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/STAY-pəl-z//ˈste.pəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Star
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/s-tahr//s.tɑɹ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stare
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/s-tayr//s.teɪɹ/ – Notice also thatand that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Start
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/s-tahr-[t]//s.tɑɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as a separate syllables –

Starter
For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the first “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAHR-d’r/ – /s.ˈtɑɹ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

State
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tay[t]//s.te[t]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Statement
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is (usually) stopped, the first “e” is silent, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAY[T]-mihn-[t]//s.ˈte[t].mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as a separate syllables –

Statesman
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “e” is silent, and for the “-man” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAY-ts-mihn//s.ˈte.ts.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “ts” combination act as a separate syllables –

Static
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is
(often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s--dih[k]//s.ˈtæ.də(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stating
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAY-ding//s.ˈte.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Station
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAY-shihn//s.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Statistician
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination,  and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

/s--dihs-TIH-shihn//s.ˌtæ.ɾə(ɪ)s.ˈtɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress is on the second syllable, that the major stress is on the fourth syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Statistics
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard

/s-tuh-TIHS-tih-ks//s.tə(ʌ).ˈtɪs.tɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “s” & the “ks” ending act as a separate syllables –

Statue
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the second “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), and the “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/s--chyoo//sˈtæ.tʃju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Statuette
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the second “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the first “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tæ-chyou-EH[T]//s.tæ.tʃju.ɛ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the fourth syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Status
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

/s--dihs/ – /ˈstæ.ɾ(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stay
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tay//s.teiː/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Steadily
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is a true-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TEH-də-lee//s.tɛˈɾə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Steady
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/s-DEH-dee//s.ˈdɛ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Steak
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/s-tay-k//s.teiː.k/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “k” ending act as separate syllables –

Steal
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/s-teel//s.tiːl/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Steam
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/s-teem//s.tiːm/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Steel
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-teel//s.tiːl/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Steep
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and that the final “p” is (often) stopped

/s-tee[p]//s.tiː[p]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Steer
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-teer//s.tiːɹ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stellar
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “a” disappears

/s-TEH-l’r//s.ˈtɛ.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Step
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/s-teh[p]//s.tɛ[p]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stereotype
 – For this word, the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” is long, the “o” is long, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/s-TAYR-ee-oh-tigh-[p]//s.ˈteɪɹ.iː.o.tʌiː.[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “p” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Stereotypes
 – For this word, the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “e” is long, the “o” is long, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the third “e” is silent

/s-TAYR-ee-oh-tigh-ps//s.ˈteɪɹ.iː.o.tʌiː.ps/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the first “s” & the “ps” ending act as separate syllables –

Stern
 – For this word, the “e” disappears

/s-t’rn//s.tɚn/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stew
 – For this word, and the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

– /s-too//s.tu/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stick
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – but at the end of a word, is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tih[k]//s.tɪ[k]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Sticker
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix, the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tih-k’r//s.tɪ.kɚ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stickler
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – and the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TIHK-l’r//s.ˈtɪk.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stiff
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tihf//s.tɪf/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stifle
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “f” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /s-TIGH-fəl//s.ˈtʌiː.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stilettos
 – For this word, the “i” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the single flap-t, the “o” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/s-tə-LEH-dohz/ – /s.tə.ˈlɛ.ɾoz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Still
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tihl//s.tɪl/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stimulate
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TIHM-you-lay[t]/ – /s.ˈtɪm.ju.le[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stimulus
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the second “u” turns into an i-schwa

/s-TIHM-you-lihs/ – /s.ˈtɪm.ju.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Sting
 – For this word, the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-ting//s.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stir
 – For this word, the “i” disappears

/s-t’r//s.tɚ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stock
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tahk//s.tɑk/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stocks
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tah-ks//s.tɑ.ks/ – Notice also that the “s” and the “ks” ending act as a separate syllables –

Stodgy
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “dg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /s-TAH-dʒee/ – /s.ˈtɑ.dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stoic
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TOH-ihk/ – /s.ˈto.ə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stoically
 – For this word, the “o” is long, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-TOH-ihk-lee/ – /s.ˈto.ə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stoicism
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is soft, and for the “ism” suffix – the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /s-TOH-ih-sih-zəm/ – /s.ˈto.ə(ɪ).sɪ.zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stole
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tohl//s.tol/ – and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stolen
 –For this word, the “o” is long, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/s-TOH-lihn//s.ˈto-lə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stomach
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”

– /s-TUH-mihk//s.ˈtʌ.mə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stone
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tohn//s.ton/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stop
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/s-tah[p]//s.tɑ[p]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stopped
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /s-tah[p]-t//s.tɑ[p].t/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “t” ending act as separate syllables –

Store
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tohr//s.toɹ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stored
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r”– the “e” is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/s-tohr-[d]//s.toɹ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “s” and the “d” ending act as separate syllables –

Storm
 – For this word, the “o” is long

/s-tohr-m//s.toɹ.m/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “m” ending act as separate syllables –

Story
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/s-TOHR-ee//s.ˈtoɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stove
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/s-tohv//s.tov/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Straight
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “gh” combination is silent, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /s-chray[t]//s.tʃɹeiː[t]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Strain
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/s-chrayn//s.tʃɹeiːn/ – Notice also that  and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Strange
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it)the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /s-trayn-dʒ//s.tʃɹeiːn.dʒ/  – Notice also that the “s” & the soft “g” ending act as separate syllables –

Strangely
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it)the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRAYN-dʒ-lee//s.ˈtʃɹeiːn.dʒ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the soft “g” act as separate syllables –

Stranger
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it)the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRAYN-dʒ’r//s.ˈtʃɹeiːn.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that  the stress is on the first syllable

Strategic
 – For this word, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “e” is long, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-chruh-TEE-dʒihk//s.tʃɹə(ʌ).ˈtiː.dʒə(ɪ)k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Strategies
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /s-CHRæ-dih-dʒee-z//s.ˈtʃɹæ.ɾə(ɪ).dʒiː.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the first “s” & the “z” ending act as separate syllables –

Strategy
 – For this word, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/s-CHRæ-dih-dʒee/ – /s.ˈtʃɹæ.ɾə(ɪ).dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Strawberry
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”(this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/s-CHRAW-bayr-ee//s.ˈtʃɹɔ.beɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stream
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/s-chreem//s.tʃɹiːm/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Streamlined
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “i” is long, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “final “d” is (often) stopped

– /s-CHREEM-lain-[d]/ – /s.ˈtʃɹiːm.laɪn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Street
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is stopped

/s-chree[t]//s.tʃɹiː[t]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Strength
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “e” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination, the “g” is pronounced like the letter “k” (this is due to the placement of the letter un-voiced “th” combination directly after it), and the “th” combination is un-voiced

– /s-chrehŋ-kth/ – /s-tʃɹɛŋ.kθ/ – Notice also that the the first “s” & the “kth” ending act as separate syllables –

Strenuous
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “e” is short, the first “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHREHN-you-ihs//s.ˈtʃɹɛn.ju.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stress
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-chehs//s.tʃɹɛs/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stressed
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

– /s-chrehs-[t]/ – /s.tʃɹɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Stressful
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard
pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHREHS-fəl/ – /s.ˈtʃɹɛs.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stretch
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “e” is short, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-chreh-ch//s.tʃɹɛ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “ch” ending act as separate syllables –

Stretching
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHREH-ching/ – /s.ˈtʃɹɛ.tʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Strict
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/s-chrih[k]-[t]//s.tʃɹɪ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “t” ending (whn not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Strictly
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is almost stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRIH[K]-[t]//s.ˈtʃɹɪ[k].t.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “t” act as separate syllables –

Strike
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “k” is (sometimes) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/s-chrigh-[k]/// – Notice also that the letter “s” & the “k” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Striking
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRIGH-king//s.ˈtʃɹʌiː.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

String
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-chring//s.tʃɹɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stringent
 – For this word, The “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRIHN-dʒə(ɪ)n-[t]//s.ˈtʃɹə(ɪ)n.dʒə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Strip
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/s-chrih[p]//s.tʃɹɪ[p]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stripe
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “p” is often stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/s-chrigh[p]//ˈs.tʃɹʌiː[p]/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Striped
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “p” is almost stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/s-CHRIGH[P]-t//s,ˈtɹʌiː[p].t/ – Notice also that the “s” & the “t” ending act as separate syllables –

Stroke
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/s-chrohk//s.tʃɹok/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stroll
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “o” is long, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-chrohl//s.tʃɹol/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Strong
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the “ing” combination

/s-chrawng//s.tʃɹɔŋ/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Structural
 – For this word, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, the second “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /s-CHRUH[K]-ch’r-əl//s.ˈtʃɹʌ[k].tʃɚ.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Structure
 – For this word, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /s-CHRUH[K]-ch’r//s.ˈtʃɹʌ[k].tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Structured
 – For this word, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

– /s-CHRUHK-ch’r-[d]//s.ˈtʃɹʌk.tʃɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Struggle
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “g” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/s-CHRUH-gəl/ – /s.ˈtʃɹʌ.gəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Struggling
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “g” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-CHRUH-gə-ling/ – /s.ˈtʃɹʌ.gə.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Student
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TOO-dihn-[t]//s.ˈtu.də(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Students
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TOO-dihn-ts//s.ˈtu.də(ɪ)n.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” & the “ts” ending act as separate syllables –

Studied
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the first “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “e”– the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /s-TUH-dee-[d]//s.ˈdʌ.ɾiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” & the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Studies
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /s-TUH-deez//s.ˈtʌ.ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Studio
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “o” is long

– /s-TOO-dee-oh//s.ˈtu.ɾiː.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Study
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /s-TUH-dee//s.ˈtʌ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Studying
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /s-TUH-dee-ying//s.ˈtʌ.ɾiː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stuff
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s-tuhf//s.tʌf/ – Notice also that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Stuffed
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “f” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/s-tuhf-t/ – /s.tʌf.t/ – Notice also that the the “s” &”t” ending act as separate syllables –

Stuffy
 – For this word, the “u” is short,the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/s-TUH-fee/ – /s.ˈtʌ.fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stunned
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “n”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/s-tuhn-[d]//s.tʌn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “s” &the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Stunt
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/s-tuhn[t]/ – /s.tʌn[t]/ – Notice also that the “s” &the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

Stupid
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/s-TOO-pih[d]//s.ˈtu.pə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Style
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” / phantom-schwa combination in-between the “y” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/s-TAI-yəl//ˈstaiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Stylish
– For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” / phantom-schwa combination in-between the “y” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s-TAI-yəl-ihsh//s.ˈtaiː.jəl.ə(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Su

Subdue
 – For this word, the first “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is (usually) stopped, and the second “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/suh[b]-DOO/ – /sə(ʌ)[b].ˈdu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Subdued
 – For this word, the first “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the second “u” is long, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “u” –the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/suh[b]-DOO-[d]/ – /sə(ʌ)[b].ˈdu.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Subject (noun)
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/SUH[B]-dʒih[k]-t//ˈsʌ[b].dʒə(ɪ)[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Subject (verb)
 –For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped

/suh[b]-dʒEH[K]-t//sʌ[b]ˈdʒɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Subjective
 –For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “j” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the “c” is hard but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh[b]-dʒEH[K]-tihv//sə(ʌ)[b]ˈdʒɛ[k].tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Submit
 – For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/suh[b]-MIH-[t]/ – /sʌ[b].ˈmɪ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Submitted
 – For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/suh[b]-MIH-dih-[d]/ – /sʌ[b].ˈmɪ.ɾə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Sub-Orbital
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “O” is long, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh[b]-OHR-bih-dəl/ – /sə(ʌ)[b].ˈoɹ.bə(ɪ).ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Subordinate
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh-BOHR-dih-nih[t]//sə(ʌ).ˈboɹ.ɾə(ɪ).nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Subordinates
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh-BOHR-dih-nih-ts//sə(ʌ).ˈboɹ.ɾə(ɪ).nə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Subprime
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is (usually) stopped, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /suh[b]-praim//sʌ[b].ˈpɹaɪm/ – Notice also that there is no discernible word-stressed –

Sub-Saharan
 – For this word, for the “Sub-” prefix – the “u” is a u-schwa, and the “b” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this prefix in The Common Tongue), the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the third “a” turns into an i-schwa

/suh[b]-suh-HAYR-ihn//ˌsə(ʌ)[b].sə(ʌ).ˈheɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Subscribe
– For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is almost stopped, the “c” is hard, the “i” is long, the “b” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/suhb-SKRAI[B]//sə(ʌ)b.ˈskɹaiː[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Subscribers
– For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is almost stopped, the “c” is hard, the “i” is long, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/suhb-SKRAI-b’r-z//sə(ʌ)b.ˈskɹaiː.bɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Subsequent
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/SUH[B]-sih-kwihn-[t]//ˈsʌ[b].sə(ɪ).kwə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Subsequently
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “qu” combination is pronounced like a “kw” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “e” is short, the “t” is (usually) “stopped”, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SUHB-sih-kwehn-[t]-lee//ˈsʌ[b].sə(ɪ).kwɛn.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Subsidiaries
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the first “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /suh[b]-SIH-dee-ayr-eez//sʌ[b].ˈsɪ.ɾiː.eɪɹ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Subsidies
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /SUHB-sih-deez//ˈsʌ[b].sə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Subsidize
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the first “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SUHB-sih-daiz//ˈsʌ[b].sə(ɪ).ɾaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Subsidy
 – for this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SUH[B]-sih-dee/ – /ˈsʌ[b].sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Substance
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SU[B]-s-tihn-s//ˈsʌ[b].s.tə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the second and third letters “s” act as separate syllables

Substantial
 – For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “b” is almost stopped, the first “a” is short, and for the “tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh[b]-s-TæN-shəl/ – /sə(ʌ)[b].s.ˈtæn.ʃəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the second letter “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Substantially
 – For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the first “a” is short, for the “-tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combiantion, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “l” combines with the “-ly” suffix and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh[b]-s-TæN-shə-lee//sə(ʌ)[b].s.ˈtæn.sə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Substitute
 – For this word, the first “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “u” is long, the third “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/SUH[B]-stih-too[t]//ˈsʌb.stə(ɪ).tu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Substituted
 – For this word, the first “u” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “u” is long, the third “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/SUHB-stih-too-dih[d]//ˈsʌb.stə(ɪ).tu.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Suburb
 – For this word, the first “u” is a u-schwathe second “u” disappears, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/suh-B’R-[b]/ – /sə(ʌ).ˈbɚ.[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Suburban
 – For this word, the first “u” is a u-schwa, the second “u” disappears, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/suh-B’R-bihn/ – /sə(ʌ).ˈbɚ.bə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Succeed
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the first “c” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “c” is soft, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /suh[k]-SEE[D]//sə(ʌ)[k].ˈsiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Succeeded
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the first “c” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “c” is soft, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /suh[k]-SEE-dih[d]//sə(ʌ)[k].ˈsiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Success
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the first “c” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “c” is soft, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /suh[k]-SEHS//sə(ʌ)[k].ˈsɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Successful
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the first “c” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “c” is soft, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /suh[k]-SEHS-f’əl/ – /sə(ʌ)[k].ˈsɛs.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Successfully
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “c” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “c” is soft, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-fully” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /sə[k]-SEHS-fəl-lee//sə[k].ˈsɛs.fəl.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Succinct
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “c”, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “c” directly after it), and the third “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/sə-SING[K]-t/ – /sə.ˈsɪŋ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Succinctly
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “c”, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “c” directly after it), the third “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-SING[K]-[t]-lee/ – /sə.ˈsɪŋ[k].[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the letter “t” (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

Succumb
 – For this word, the first “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the second “u” is short, and the final “b” is silent

/sə-KUHM//sə.ˈkʌm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Succumbed
 – For this word, the first “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the second “u” is short, the “b” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/sə-KUHM-[d]//sə.ˈkʌm.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

 

Succumbing
 – For this word, the first “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the second “u” is short, the “b” is silent, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-KUH-ming//sə.ˈkʌ.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Such
 – For this word, the “u” is short

/suhch//sʌtʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Suck
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – however, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/suh[k]//sʌ[k]/

Sudden
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/SUH-dihn//ˈsʌ.ɾə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Suddenly
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue– However, here is is (usually) stopped, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SUH-[d]ihn-lee//ˈsʌ.[ɾ]ə(ɪ)n.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sue
 – For this word, the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/soo/ – /su/ –

Sued
 – For this word, the “u” is long, and the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “u” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/soo-[d]/ – /su.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Suffer
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/SUH-f’r//ˈsʌ.fɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Suffering
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SUH-f’r-ing/ – /ˈsʌ.fɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Suffers
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SUH-f’rz//ˈsʌ.fɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sufficient
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sə-FIH-shihn-[t]//səˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.[t] / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Sufficiently
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-FIH-shihn-[t]-lee//səˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.[t].liː / – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

Sugar
 – For this word, the “S” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” turns into a true-schwa / Short “I” combination (like in the word “foot” or “put”), the “g” is hard, and the “a” disappears

– /SHəih-g’r//ˈʃəɪ.gɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Suggest
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the second “g” is soft, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sə[g]-dʒEHS-[t]//sə[g].ˈdʒɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Suggestable
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the second “g” is soft, the “e” is short, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə[g]-dʒEHS-tuh-bəl//sə[g].ˈdʒɛs.tə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Suggests
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the second “g” is soft, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sə[g]-dʒEHS-ts//sə[g].ˈdʒɛs.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Suggestion
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the second “g” is soft, the “e” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “s” directly before it), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə[g]-dʒEHS-chihn//sə[g].ˈdʒɛs.tʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Suggestions
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the first “g” is hard but is (often) stopped, the second “g” is soft, the “e” is short, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination sounds like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “s” directly before it), the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /suh[g]-dʒEHS-chihn-z//sə(ʌ)[g].ˈdʒɛs.tʃən.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Suit
 – For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

– /soo[t]//su[t]/

Suitable
 – For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SOO-duh-bəl/ – /ˈsu.ɾə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Suitcase
 – For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/SOO[T]-kays//ˈsu[t].keiːs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Suite
 – For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced like a letter “w” / long “e” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /swee[t]//swiː[t]/

Suited
 – For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/SOO-dih-[d]//ˈsu.ɾə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Suits
 – For this word, the “ui” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/soo-ts/ – /su.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Sum
 – For this word, the “u” is short

/suhm//sʌm/

Summarize
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SUH-muh-raiz//ˈsʌ.mə(ʌ).ɹaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Summary
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SUH-m’r-ee//ˈsʌ.mɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Summer
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

/SUH-m’r//ˈsʌ.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sun
 – For this word, the “u” is short

/suhn//sʌn/

Sun-Bathing
 – For this compound-word, the “u” is short, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “th” is voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SUHN-bay-thing//ˈsʌn.beiː.ðɪŋ/ – Notice also that  the stress is on the first syllable

Sun-Burnt
 – For this compound-word, the first “u” is short, the second “u” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/SUHN-b’rn-[t]//ˈsʌn.bɚn.[t] / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Sunday
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and for the “-day” suffix – the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SUHN-day//ˈsʌn.deiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sunk
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/sung-k/ – /sʌŋ.k/ –

Sunny
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SUH-nee/ – /ˈsʌ.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sunset
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/SUHN-seh[t]//ˈsʌn.sɛt/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Super
– For this word, the “u” is long, and the “e” disappears

/SOO-p’r//ˈsu.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Superficial
– For this word, the “u” is long, the “e” disappears, the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/soo-p’r-FIH-shəl//ˌsu.pɚ.ˈfɪ.ʃəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Superior
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” disappears, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-PEER-ee-y’r//sə.ˈpiːɹ.iː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Supermarket
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the first “e” disappears, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/SOO-p’r-mahr-kih[t]//ˈsu.pɚ.mɑɹ.kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Supersede
 – For this word,  the “u” is long, the first “e” disappears, the second “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/soo-p’r-SEE-[d]//ˌsu.pɚˈsiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

Superstar
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “e” disappears, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

– /SOO-p’r-s-tahr//ˈsu.pɚ.s.tɑɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the second letter “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Superstition
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “e” disappears, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/soo-p’r-s-TIH-shihn//ˌsu.pɚ.s.ˈtɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the major stress is on the third syllable and that the second letter “s” acts as a separate syllable

Supervisor
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “e” disappears, the “i” is long, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SOO-p’r-vai-z’r/ – /ˈsu.pɚ.vaiː.zɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Supervisors
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “e” disappears, the “i” is long, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SOO-p’r-vai-z’r-z//ˈsu.pɚ.vaiː.zɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Supplement
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the
final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SUH-plə-mihn-[t]//ˈsʌ.plə.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Supplementary
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “a” disappears, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /suhp-lə-MEHN-tə-ree//sʌ.plə.ˈmɛn.tɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Supply
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i” (this is not pronounced as an “-ly” suffix)

/suh-PLAI//sə(ʌ).ˈplaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Support
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/suh-POHR-[t]//sə(ʌ).ˈpoɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Supporter
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suh-POHR-d’r//sə(ʌ).ˈpoɹ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Supportive
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /suh-POHR-dihv/ – /sə(ʌ).ˈpoɹ.ɾə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Supportively
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “t” is a flap-t, for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /suh-POHR-dihv-lee/ – /sə(ʌ).ˈpoɹ.ɾə(ɪ)v.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Suppose
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /suh-POHZ//sʌ.ˈpoz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Supposedly
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /suh-POH-zih[d]-lee//sʌ.ˈpo.zə(ɪ)[d].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Sure
 – For this word, the “S” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/sh’r//ʃɚ/

Sure-Fire
 – For this term, the “S” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, the first “e” is silent, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/SH’R-figh-y’r/ – /ˈʃɚ.fʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Surely
 – For this word, the “S” is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SH’R-lee//ˈʃɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Surface
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent

/S’R-fihs//ˈsɚ.fə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Surge
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/s’r-dʒ//sɚ.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft letter “g” acts a second syllable

Surgeon
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “g” is soft, and the “eo” combination turns into an i-schwa

/S’R-dʒihn/ – /sɚ.dʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Surgery
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “g” is soft, the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/S’R-dʒ’r-ee/ – /ˈsɚ.dʒɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Surname
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/S’R-naym//ˈsɚ.neiːm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Surpass
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “a” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/s’r-PæS//sɚ.ˈpæs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Surpassed
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “a” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (sometimes) stopped

/s’r-PæS-[t]/ – /sɚ.ˈpæs.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Surprise
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “r” is almost silent, the “i” is long, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /sə[r]-PRAIZ//sə[ɹ].ˈpɹaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Surprised
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “r” is almost silent, the “i” is long, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /sə[r]-PRAIZ-[d]/ – /sə[ɹ].ˈpɹaiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Surprising
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “r” is almost silent, the first “i” is long, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix)

– /sə[r]-PRAI-zing//sə[ɹ].ˈpɹaiː.zɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Surprisingly
– For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the first “r” is almost silent, the first “i” is long, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /sə[r]-PRAI-zing-lee/ – /sə[ɹ].ˈpɹaiː.zɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Surround
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/s’r-OWN-[d]//sɚ.ˈɑun.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Surrounding
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s’r-OWN-ding//sɚ.ˈɑun.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Surroundings
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/s’r-OWN-ding-z//sɚ.ˈɑun.dɪŋ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Surveillance
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /s’r-VAY-lihn-s//sɚ.ˈveiː.lə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Survey
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, and the “ey” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

– /S’R-vay//ˈsɚ.veiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Surveyed
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “ey” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “a” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/S’R-vay[d]//ˈsɚ.veiː[d] / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Surveys
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “ey” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/S’R-vayz/ – /ˈsɚ.veiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Survival
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “i” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s’r-VAI-vəl//sɚ.ˈvaiː.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Survive
 – For this word, the “u” disappears, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/s’r-VAIV//sɚ.ˈvaiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Susceptible
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “sc” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (the “c” is silent), the “e” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /sə-SEH[P]-tih-bəl//sə.sɛ[p].tə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Suspect (noun)
– For this word, the “u” is short, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/SUHS-peh[k]-[t]//ˈsʌs.pɛ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Suspect (verb)
– For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/suhs-PEH[K]-[t]//sə(ʌ)s.ˈpɛ[k].[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Suspense
 – For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the first “e” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/suhs-PEHN-s//sə(ʌ)s.ˈpɛn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Suspicion
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/suh-SPIH-shihn//sə(ʌ).ˈspɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Suspicious
 – For this word, the “u” is a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/suhs-PIH-shihs//sə(ʌ)sˈpɪ.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Sussex
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/SUH-sih-ks/ – /ˈsʌ.sə(ɪ).ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Sustainability
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-ability” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is
pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/səs-tayn-ə-BIH-lih-dee//səs.ˌteiːnə(ʌ).ˈbɪ.lə(ɪ). ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the second syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Sustainable
 – For this word, the “u” turns into a true-schwa, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to
the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /səs-TAYN-uh-bəl//səs.teiː.nə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Sw

Swallow
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l”, and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation)

/SWAH-loh//ˈswɑ.lo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Swanky
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SWæNG-kee/ – /ˈswæŋ.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Swear
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong

/swayr//sweɪɹ/

Swearing
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SWAYR-ing//ˈsweɪɹ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sweat
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sweh[t]//swɛ[t]/

Sweater
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SWEH-d’r//ˈswɛ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Swede
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the second “e” is silent

– /swee[d]//swiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sweden
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the second “e” turns into an i-schwa

– /SWEE-dihn//ˈswiː.ɾə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sweep
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/swee[p]//swiː[p]/

Sweet
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/swee[t]//swiː[t]/

Swell
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced like the single letter “l” (this is the standard Pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/swehl//swɛl/

Swelling
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced like the single letter “l” (this is the standard Pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SWEH-ling//ˈswɛ.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Swerve
 – For this word, the first “e” diappears, and the final “e” is silent

/sw’r-v/ – /swɚ.v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “v” ending acts as a separate syllable

Swim
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/swihm//swɪm/

Swimming
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SWIH-ming//ˈswɪ.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Swing
 – For this word, the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/swing//ˈswɪŋ/

Swiss
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/swihs//swɪs/

Switch
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/swih-ch//swɪ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Switzerland
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “tz” combination is pronounced like the “ts” combination, the “e” disappears, and for the “-land” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SWIH-ts’r-lihn-[d]//ˈswɪ.tsɚ.lə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Swollen
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SWə-lihn//ˈswə.lə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sword
 – For this word, the w is silent, the “o” is long, and the final “d” is often stopped

/sohr-[d]//ˈsoɹ.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Swords
 – For this word, the w is silent, the “o” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SOHR-dz//ˈsoɹ.dz/ – Notice also that the “dz” ending acts as a second syllable

Sy

Sydney
– For this word, the first “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the “ey” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/SI[D]-nee//ˈsɪ[ɾ].niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Symbol
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, and the “o” turns into a true-schwa

/SIHM-bəl//ˈsɪm.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sympathetic
 – For this word, the “y” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sihm-puh-THEH-dih[k]//ˌsə(ɪ)m.pə(ʌ).ˈθɛ.ɾə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Sympathize
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIHM-puh-thaiz/ – /ˈsɪm.pə(ʌ).θaiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sympathized
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/SIHM-puh-thaiz-[d]/ – /ˈsɪm.pə(ʌ).θaiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Sympathy
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SIHM-puh-thee//ˈsɪm.pə(ʌ).θiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Symphonies
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /SIHM-fuh-neez//ˈsɪm.fə(ʌ).niːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Symphony
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /SIHM-fuh-nee//ˈsɪm.fə(ʌ).niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Symposium
 – For this word, the “y” turns into an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the second “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “u” turns into a true-schwa

/sihm-POH-zee-əm//sɪmˈpo.ziː.əm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Symptom
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “p” is stopped, the “o” turns into a true-schwa

– /SIHM[P]-təm/ – /ˈsɪm[p].təm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Symptoms
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “p” is stopped, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /SIHM[P]-təm-z/ – /ˈsɪm[p].təm.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Syndicate
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIHN-dih-kih[t]//ˈsɪn.də(ɪ).kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Synonym
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “y” turns into an i-schwa

– /SIHN-uh-nihm//ˈsɪn.ə(ʌ).nə(ɪ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Synonyms
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “y” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /SIHN-uh-nihm-z//ˈsɪn.ə(ʌ).nə(ɪ)m.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

System
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, and the “e” turns into a u-schwa

/SIHS-tuhm//ˈsɪs.tə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter S ) –

(Go To Sa – Sm)


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