– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter S ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Ss

 

Sc . Se . Sh . Si . Sk . Sl . Sm . Sn – Sy

 

Sabotage
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

– /-buh-tahzh/ – /ˈsæ.bə(ʌ).tɑʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Saboteur
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “eu” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/sæ-bə-TOO-w’r/ – /sæ.bə.ˈtu.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Saboteurs
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “eu” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/sæ-bə-TOO-w’r-z/ – /sæ.bə.ˈtu.wɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Sack
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tonguebut is (often) stopped

/sæ-[k]/ – /sæ.[k]/ –

Sad
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/sæ[d]/ – /sæ[ɾ]/ –

Sadly
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, liːand for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/[D]-lee/ – /sæ[ɾ].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Sadness
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/[D]-nihs/ – /ˈsæ[ɾ].nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Safe
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/sayf/ – /seiːf/ –

Safeguard
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is silent, the “g” is hard, the “ua” combination is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/SAYF-gahr-[d]//ˈseiːf.gɑɹ.[ɾ] / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Safely
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAYF-lee/ – /ˈseiːf.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Safety
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is silent, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /SAYF-tee//ˈseiːf.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Saharan
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the second “a” is Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the third “a” turns into an i-schwa

/suh-HAYR-ihn//sə(ʌ).ˈheɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Said
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) Stopped

– /seh[d]/ – /sɛ[ɾ]/ –

Sail
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it)

/sayl/ – /seɪl/ –

Sailboat
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /SAYL-boh[t]//ˈseɪl.bo[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Sailing
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAY-ling/ – /ˈseɪ.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Sailor
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue

/SAY-l’r/ – /ˈseiː.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Saint
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sayn-[t]//seiːn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Salad
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/-lih[d]/ – /ˈsæ.lə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Salary
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /-luh-ree//ˈsæ.lə(ʌ).ɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sale
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “a” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/sayl/ – /seɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Sales
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), there is a phantom-schwa in between the “a” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /say-əl-z/ – /seɪ.əl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Salesman
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), there is a phantom-schwa in between the “a” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-man” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SAYL-z-mihn/ – /ˈseɪl.z,mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” sound of the second “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Saleswoman
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), there is a phantom-schwa in between the “a” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-woman” suffix – the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SAYL-z-wə.mihn/ – /ˈseɪl.z.wə.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” sound of the second “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Salmon
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “l” is silent, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/-mihn//ˈsæ.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Salt
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sawl-[t]/ –/sɔl.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Salty
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SAWL-tee/ – /ˈsɔl.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Samaritan
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the last “a” turns into an i-schwa

/suh-MAYR-ih-tihn/ – /sə(ʌ).meɪɹ.ə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Same
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

– /saym//seiːm/

Sample
 – For this word, the “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/SæM-pəl/ – /ˈsæm.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Samples
 – For this word, the “a” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SæM-pəl.z/ – /ˈsæm.pəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

San Francisco
 – For this city’s name,  the first “a” is short, the second “a” is short, the “c” is soft, the “i” is short, the second “c” is hard, and the final “o” is long

– /sæn-fræn-SIHS-koh//sæn fɹæn.ˈsɪs.ko/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Sand
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/sæn-[d]/ – /sæn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Sandal
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, and the second “a” disappears

/SæN-dəl//ˈsæn.dəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Sandals
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SæN-dəl-z//ˈsæn.dəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Sang
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “ring”, “rang,” or “rung” (This is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /sæng//sæŋ/

Sanitarium
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “u” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “u” is a u-schwa

/sæ-nih-TAYR-ee-yuhm//sæ.nə(ɪ).ˈteɪɹ.iː.jə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Saskatchewan
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into an i-schwa, the second “a” is short, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the third “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/sih-SKæ-chə-wahn//sə(ɪ).ˈskæ.tʃə.wɑn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Satin
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “i” is an i-schwa

– /-[t]ihn//ˈsæ.[t]ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Satire
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r”, and the final “e” is silent

/-tigh-y’r/ – /ˈsæ.tʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the phantom letter “y” & letter “r” ending acts as a third syllable –

Satisfaction
 – For this word, the first “s” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sæ-dihs-FæK-shihn//sæ.ɾə(ɪ)s.ˈfæk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Satisfied
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/-dihs-fai[d]//ˈsæ.ɾə(ɪ)s.faiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Satisfy
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/-dihs-fai/ – /ˈsæ.ɾə(ɪ)s.faiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Satisfying
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-dihs-fai-ying//ˈsæ.ɾə(ɪ)s.faiː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Saturate
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciations of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/-ch’r-ay[t]//ˈsæ.tʃɚ.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Saturated
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/-ch’r-ay-tih[d]//ˈsæ.tʃɚ.e.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Saturation
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappearsthe second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sæ-ch’r-AY-shihn/ – /sæ.tʃɚ.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Saturday
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “t” is flap-t, the “u” disappears, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /-d’r-day/ – /ˈsæ.ɾəɹ.ɾeɪ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sauce
 – For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/saw-s/ – /sɔ.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable –

Saudi Arabia
 – For the name of this country, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, then the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the third “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/sow-dee uh-RAY-bee-uh/ – /ˌsau.diː ə(ʌ).ˈɹe.biː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Saudi Arabian
 – For this term, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, then the “A” turns into a u-schwa, the third “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the third second “i” and the third “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the third “a” turns into an i-schwa

/sow-dee uh-RAY-bee-yihn/ – /ˌsau.diː ə(ʌ).ˈɹe.biː.jɪ(ʌ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Sauna
 – For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/SAW-nuh//ˈsɔ.nə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sausage
 – For this word, the “au” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /SAW-sih-dʒ//ˈsɔ.sə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Savasana
 – For this word, the “S” is pronounced like the un-voiced “Sh” combination, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the third “a” disappears, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/shuh-VAHS-nuh//ʃə(ʌ).ˈvɑs.nə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Save
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/sayv/ –/seiːv/ –

Saving
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAY-ving/ – /ˈse.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Savvy
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “vv” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “v”, and the final letter “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/-vee//ˈsæ.viː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Saw
 – For this word, the “aw” combination is pronounce like in the word “law” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/saw//sɔ/

Say
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/say/ – /seiː/ –

Saying
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “y” takes the consonant sound, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAY-ying//ˈseiː.yɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Says
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the short letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /sehz//sɛz/ –

Sc

Scale
– For this word, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/skayl/ – /skeɪl/ –

Scarce
 – For this word, the first “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “c” is soft, the “e” is silent

– /skayr-s/ – /ˈskeɪɹ.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

Scarcely
 – For this word, the first “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “c” is soft, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SKAYR-slee//ˈskeɪɹ.sliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Scare
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/skayr//skeɪɹ/

Scared
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/skayr-[d]//skeɪɹ.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Scarf
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/skahr-f//skɑɹ.f/ – Notice also that the “f” ending acts as a second syllable

Scary
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SKAYR-ee/ – /ˈskeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Scan
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, and the “a” is short

/skæn/ – /skæn/ –

Scandal
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the first “a” is short, and the second “a” turns into a true-schwa

/SKæN-dəl/ – /ˈskæn.dəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Scandinavia
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the first “a” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the final “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/skæn-dih-NAY-vee-yuh//skæn.də(ɪ).ˈneiː.viː.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Scanning
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SKæ-ning/ – /ˈskæ.nɪŋ/ –

Scene
 – For this word, the “c” is silent, the first “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /seen//siːn/ – (This word is pronounced exactly the same as the past participle form of the word “see” [“seen”]) –

Scenery
 – For this word, the “c” is silent, the first “e” is long, the second “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SEE-n’r-ee//ˈsiː.nɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Scent
 – For this word, the “c” is silent, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often Stopped)

/SEHN-[t]//ˈsɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Scents
 – For this word, the “c” is silent, and the “e” is short

/SEHN-ts//ˈsɛn.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Schedule
 – For this word, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “e” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “u” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/SKEH-dʒoo-əl//ˈskɛ.dʒu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Scheduled
 – For this word, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “e” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/SKEH-dʒəl-[d]/ – /ˈskɛ.dʒəl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Schedules
 – For this word, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “e” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “u” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the second “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /SKEH-dʒoo-əl-z//ˈskɛ.dʒu.əl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Scheme
 – For this word, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /skeem//skiːm/

Schemes
 – For this word, the “ch” is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/skeem-z/ – /skiːm.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

Scholarship
 – For this word, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the “o” is short, the “a” disappears, , and for the “-ship” suffix – the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SKAH-l’r-shih[p]/ – /ˈskɑ.lɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

School
 – For this word, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/skool/ – /skul/ –

Schooling
 – For this word, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/skool-ing/ – /skul.ɪŋ/ –

Science
 – For this word, the first “c” is silent, the “i” is long, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SAI-ihn-s//ˈsaɪ.ə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

Scientific
 – For this word, the first “c” is silent, the first “i” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /sai-ihn-TIH-fih[k]//saiː.ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɪ.fə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Scientifically
 – For this word, the “c” is silent, the “i” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is short, for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

– /sai-ihn-TIH-fih[k]-lee//saiː.ə(ɪ)n.ˈtɪ.fə(ɪ)[k].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Scientist
 – For this word, the “c” is silent, the first “i” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAI-ihn-tihs-[t]/ – /ˈsaiː.ə(ɪ)n.tə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Scientists
 – For this word, the “c” is silent, the first “i” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAI-ihn-tihs-ts//ˈsaiː.ə(ɪ)n.tə(ɪ)s.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Scissors
 – For this word, the “c” is silent, the “i” is short, the “ss” combination is pronounced like the letter “z”, the “o” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SIH-z’r-z/ – /ˈsɪ.zɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Sclerosis
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “o” is long, and the “i” is an i-schwa

/sklə-ROH-sihs/ – /sklə.ˈɹo.sə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Score
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/skohr/ – /skoɹ/ –

Scotland
– For this word, the “o” is short, and for the “-land” suffix – the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SKAH[T]-lihn-[d]//ˈskɑ[t].lə(ɪ)n.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

Scottish
– For this word, the “c” is hard, the “o” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t, and for the “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SKAH-dihsh//ˈskɑ.də(ɪ)ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Scratch
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/skræ-ch/ – /skɹæ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable –

Scream
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/skreem/ – /skriːm/ –

Screen
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/skreen/ – /skriːn/ –

Screw
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, and the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/skroo/ – /skɹu/ –

Screwdriver
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “ew” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is long, ɚ – , and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this
suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SKROO-dʒɹaiː-v’r/ – /ˈskɹu.dʒɹaiː.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Script
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “i” is short, and the “p” is (usually) stopped

/skrih[p]-t//skɹɪ[p].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Scrub
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “u” is short, and the final “b” is (usually) stopped

– /skruh[b]//skɹʌ[b]/

Scruffy
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SKRUH-fee/ – /ˈskɹʌ.fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Scrutinize
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the first “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SKROO[T]-ih-naiz/ – /ˈskɹu[t].ə(ɪ).naiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Scrutinized
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the first “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/SKROO[T]-ih-naiz-[d]/ – /ˈskɹu[t].ə(ɪ).naiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Scrutinizing
 – For this word, the “c” is hard, the “u” is long, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the first “i” is an i-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the “e” is dropped, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

– /SKROO[T]-ih-naiz-ing/ – /ˈskɹu[t].ə(ɪ).naiːz.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Se

Sea
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/see/ – /siː/ –

Seal
 – For this word, the “e” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa 

/SEE-əl/ – /ˈsiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Search
 – For this word, the “ea” combination disappears

/s’r-ch/ – /sɚ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable –

Searching
 – For this word, the “ea” combination disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/s’r-ching/ – /sɚ.tʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable –

Seaside
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/SEE-sai[d]/ – /ˈsiː.saiː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Season
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

– /SEE-zihn//ˈsiː.zə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Seasonal
 – For this word, the “ea” is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEE-zihn-əl/ – /ˈsiː.zə(ɪ)n.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Seasoned
 – For this word, the “ea” is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/SEE-zihn-[d]/ – /ˈsiː.zə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Seat
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/see[t]//siː[t]/

Seats
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/see-ts//siː.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Second
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/SEH-kihn-[t]//ˈsɛ.kə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Seconds
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/SEH-kihn-ts//ˈsɛ.kə(ɪ)n.ds/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Secondary
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-kihn-dayr-ee//ˈsɛ.kə(ɪ)n.deɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Secret
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “c” is hard, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/SEE-krih[t]//ˈsiː.kɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Secretary
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the second “e” turns into a true-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SEH-krə-tayr-ee/ – /ˈsɛ.kɹə.teɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Section
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHK-shihn//ˈsɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sector
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the “o” disappears

/SEH[K]-t’r//ˈsɛ[k].tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Secular
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “a” disappears

/SEH-kyoo-l’r/ – /ˈsɛ.kju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Secure
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /sə-KYOO-ər//sə.ˈkju.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Secured
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/sə-KYOO-ər-[d]/ – /sə.ˈkju.ɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the secured syllable and that the flap-d ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Security
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /sih-KYOO-rih-dee//sə(ɪ).kju.ɹə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Sedentary
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-dihn-tayr-ee//ˈsɛ.ɾə(ɪ)n.teɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Seductive
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an true-schwa, the “u” is short, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /sə-DUHK-tihv//sə.ˈdʌk.tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

See
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/see//siː/

Seed
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is and flap-d but is (often) stopped

/see[d]//siː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Seek
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/see[k]//siː[k]/

Seem
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/seem//siːm/

Seemed
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/seem-[d]//siːm.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Seemingly
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SEE-ming-lee//ˈsiː.mɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Seems
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /seem-z//siːm.z/ – Notice also that that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

Segmentation
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is hard, the second “e” turns into an i-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sehg-mihn-TAY-shihn/ – /seg.mə(ɪ)n.ˈtaiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable –

Segregation
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “g” is hard, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “g” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/seh-grə.GAY-shihn/ – /sɛ.gɹə.ˈgeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Seizures
 – For this word, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “z” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, the second “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounce almost like the letter “z”

/SEE-zh’r-z/ – /ˈsiː.ʒɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Select
– For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the “t” is almost stopped

/sə-LEH[K]-t//səˈlɛ[k].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Selection
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-LEHK-shihn//sə.ˈlɛk.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Self
 – For this word, the “e” is short

/sehl-f//sɛl.f/ – Notice also that the “f” ending acts as a second syllable

Self-Sufficient
 – For this term, the first “e” is short, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /sehl-f-suh-FIH-shehn-[t]/ – /ˌsɛlf-sʌ.ˈfɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first word, that the major stress is on the second syllable of the second word, and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Selfie
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /SEHL-fee//ˈsɛl.fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sell
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/sehl//sɛl/

Seminar
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/SEH-mih-nahr/ – /ˈsɛ.mə(ɪ).nɑɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Seminary
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SEH-mih-nayr-ee/ – /ˈsɛ.mə(ɪ).neɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Senate
– For this word, the first “e” is short, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the
final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-nih[t]//ˈsɛ.nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Senator
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHN-ə-t’r/ – /ˈsɛ.nə.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Send
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/sehn-[d]//sɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Senior
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEEN-y’r//ˈsiːn.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sensationalism
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sehn-SAY-tion-əl.ih-zəm//sɛn.ˈseiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.əl.ə(ɪ).zəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Sense
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/sehn-s//sɛn.s/ – Notice also that the “s” ending acts as a second syllable

Sensible
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHN-sih-bəl//ˈsɛn.sə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sensitive
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is
the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHN-sih-tihv//ˈsɛn.sə(ɪ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sentence
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHN-tihn-s//ˈsɛn.tə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “s” acts as a third syllable –

Sentenced
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “t” is (often) stopped, for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/SEHN-[t]ihn-s[t]//ˈsɛn.[t]ə(ɪ)n.s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable (even when the “t” is stopped)

Sentences
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” combines with the “-es” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/SEHN-tihn-sihz//ˈsɛn.tə(ɪ)n.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Separable
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “a” disappears, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-p’r-uh-bəl//ˈsɛ.pɚ.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Separate
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “a” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-prih[t]//ˈsɛ.pɹə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Separated
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “a” disappears, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending and turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-p’r-ay-dih[d]//ˈsɛ.pɚ.eɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Separately
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the first “a” disappears, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SEHP-rih[t]-lee/ – /ˈsɛp.ɹə(ɪ)[t].liː/ – Notice also the stress is on the first syllable –

Separation
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the first “a” disappears, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/seh-p’r-AY-shihn//sɛ.pɚ.ˈe.ʃə(ɪ)n/ –Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

September
 – For this word, the first “e” is short but almost turns into a schwa, the “p” is (usually) stopped, the second “e” is short, and the third “e” disappears

/seh[p]-TEHM-b’r//sɛ[p].ˈtɛm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Sequence
– For this word, the first “e” is long, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEE-kwihn-s//ˈsiː.kwɪn.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

Series
 – For this word, the first “e” is long, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounce almost like the letter “z”

/SEER-eez//ˈsiːɹ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Serious
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next),  and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SEER-ee-yihs//ˈsiːɹ.iː.jə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Seriously
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEER-ee-yihs-lee//ˈsiːɹ.iː.jə(ɪ)s.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Servant
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/S’R-vihn-[t]//ˈsɚ.və(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Serve
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/s’r-v//sɚ.v/ – Notice also that the “v” ending acts as a second syllable –

Served
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “v” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is often stopped

– /s’r-v-d/ – /sɚ.v.d/ – Notice also that the “v” and the “d” ending act as separate syllables –

Service
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, ə(ɪ)s – , and for the “-ice” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/S’R-vihs//ˈsɚ.və(ɪ)s/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Session
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the first “s” combines with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-ssion” suffix – the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-shihn//ˈsɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Set
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/seh[t]//sɛ[t]/ –

Setting
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEH-ding//ˈsɛ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Settle
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l”, and the final “e” is silent

/SEH-dəl//ˈsɛ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Seven
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” turns into an i-schwa

/SEH-vihn//ˈsɛ.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Seventeen
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-teen” suffix – the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination and this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/seh-vihn-TEEN//sɛ.və(ɪ)n.ˈtiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Seventh
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/SEH-vihn-th//ˈsɛ.və(ɪ)n.θ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Seventy
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SEH-vihn-dee//ˈsɛ.və(ɪ)n.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Seventy-Seven
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the third “e” is short, and the forth “e” turns into an i-schwa

/seh-vihn-dee-SEH-vihn//sɛ.və(ɪ)n.ɾiː.ˈsɛ.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the forth syllable

Several
 – For this word, the the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SEHV-rəl//ˈsɛv.ɹəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Severance
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHV-rihn-s//ˈsɛv.ɹə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Severe
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is long, and the last “e” is silent

/sə-VEER//sə.ˈviːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “r” ending acts as a third syllable

Severely
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is long, the third “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sə-VEER-lee//sə.ˈviːɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “r” ending acts as a third syllable

Severed
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /SEH-v’r-d//ˈsɛ.vɚ.d/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Sew
 – For this word, the “ew” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “o”

/soh//so/ –

Sewing
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SOH-wing/ – /ˈso.wɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Sex
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/seh-ks//sɛ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

Sexist
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ks” combination, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SEHK-sihs-[t]/ – /ˈsɛk.sə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Sexual
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ksh” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SEK-shoo-əl//ˈsɛk.ʃu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sexualized
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “x” is pronounced like a “ksh” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

– /SEK-shoo-əl-aiz-[d]//ˈsɛk.ʃu.əl.aiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fifth syllable –

Sh

Shade
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong , the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/shay[d]//ʃeiː[ɾ]/

Shadow
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/SHæ-doh//ˈʃæ.ɾo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shake
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/shay-k/ – /ˈʃeiː.k/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “k” acts as a separate syllable –

Shaking
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHAY-king/ – /ˈʃeiː.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Shaky
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SHAY-kee//ˈʃeiː.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shall
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/shæl//ʃæl/

Shallow
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

– /SHæ-loh//ˈʃæ.lo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shame
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/shaym//ʃeiːm/

Shape
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/shay[p]//ʃe[p]/

Shaped
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending, is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/say[p]-t//ʃe[p].t / – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Shapers
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a True Long “A”, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SHAY-p’r-z//ˈʃe.pɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Share
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/shayr//ʃeɪɹ/

Shareholders
 – This compound word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “e” is silent, the second “h” is pronounced, the “o” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /SHAYR-hohl-d’r-z//ˈʃeɪɹ.hol.ɾɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Sharing
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHAYR-ing//ˈʃeɪɹ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shark
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/shahr-[k]//ʃɑɹ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Sharp
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/shahr-[k]//ʃɑɹ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Sharply
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “p” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHAHR-[p]lee//ˈʃɑɹ.[p]liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shatter
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the ‘tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

– /SHæ-d’r/ – /ʃæ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Shattered
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the ‘tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /SHæ-d’r-[d]/ – /ʃæ.ɾɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Shave
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/shayv//ʃev/

She
 – For this word, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and the final “e” is long

/shee/ – /ʃiː/ –

Sheep
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “p” is (often) stopped

– /shee[p]//ˈʃiː[p]/

Sheet
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/shee[t]//ʃiː[t]/

Shelf
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is short

/shel-f//ʃɛl.f/ – Notice also that the “f” ending acts as a second syllable

Shell
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/shehl//ʃɛl/

Shelter
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” disappears

/SHEHL-t’r//ˈʃɛl.tɚ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Shepherd
 – For this word, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the first “e” is short, the “h” is silent, the second “e” disappears, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/SHEH-p’r-[d]/ – /ˈʃɛ.pɚ.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Shift
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/shihf.[t]//ʃɪf.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Shifty
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /SHIHF-tee/ –  /ˈshɪf.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shimmer
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the first “i” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” disappears

– /SHIH-m’r//ˈʃɪ.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shimmering
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the first “i” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SHIH-m’r-ing//ˈʃɪ.mɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shine
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/shain//ʃaiːn/

Shiny
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SHAI-nee//ˈʃaiː.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ship
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/shih[p]//ʃɪ[p]/

Shirt
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sh’r-[t]//ʃɚ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Shock
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (This is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/shahk/ – /ʃɑk/ –

Shocked
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) however it is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /shah[k]-t//ʃɑ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Shocking
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHAH-king//ˈʃɑ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shoe
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, and the “oe” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/shoo//ʃu/

Shoes
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “oe” that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/shooz/ – /ʃuz/ –

Shoot
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “oo” is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /shoo[t]//ʃu[t]/

Shooting
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “oo” is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a flap, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHOO-ding//ˈʃu.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shop
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short, and the final “p” is (usually) stopped

/shah-[p]//ʃɑ.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Shops
– For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short

/shah-ps//ʃɑ.ps/ – Notice also that the “ps” ending acts as a second syllable –

Shopaholic
 – For this ridiculous word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the first “o” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “o” pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/shah-puh-HAWL-ih[k]/ – /ʃɑ.pə(ʌ).ˈhɔ.lə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Shopping
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHAH-ping//ˈʃɑ.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Short
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/shohr-[t]//ʃoɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Shorten
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is long, the “t” becomes into a glottal stop, and the first “e” disappears

/SHOHR-‘n//ˈʃoɹ.ʔ.n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “n” –

Shortened
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is long, the “t” becomes into a glottal stop, the first “e” disappears, and since the root-word (+ the “-en” suffix) ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is often stopped

/SHOHR-‘n-[d]//ˈʃoɹ.ʔ.n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “n” and the  “d” (when not stopped) acts as separate syllables –

Shortly
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is long, the “t” becomes into a glottal stop, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHOHR-[t]-lee//ˈʃoɹ.ʔ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shot
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /shah[t]/ – /ʃɑ[t]/ –

Shots
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is short

/shah-ts//ʃɑ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Should
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “oul” combination is prounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /shəih[d]/ – /ʃəɪ[ɾ]/

Shoulder
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the long letter “o”, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHOHL-d’r/ – /ˈʃol.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shouldn’t
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “oul” combination is prounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom i-schwa in-between the “d” and the “n” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/shəih-dihn-[t]//ʃəɪ.ɾə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “t” (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Shout
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/show-[t]//ʃɑ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Shouted
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /SHOW-dih-[d]//ˈʃau.ɾə(ɪ).[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Shovel
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “e” disappears

– /SHUH-v’l//ˈʃʌ.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Show
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/shoh//ʃo/

Shows
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/shoh-z//ʃo.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Showed
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “ow” is pronounced simply like the long letter “o”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “o” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) “stopped”

/shoh-[d]/ – /ʃo.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Shower
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “o” is long, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SHAH-w’r//ˈʃɑ.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shrimp
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/shrihm-[p]//ʃɹɪm.[p]/ – Notice also that that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Shuffle
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “u” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “f” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/SHUH-fəl/ – /ˈʃʌ.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shut
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/shuh-[t]//ʃʌ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Shut-Eye
– For this term, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, the “u” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “Eye” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/SHU-dai//ˈʃʌ.ɾaiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Shy
 – For this word, the “Sh” combination is un-voiced, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/shai/ – /ʃaiː/ –

Si

Sick
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) but here it is (often) stopped

/sih[k]//sɪ[k]/

Side
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/sai[d]//saiː[ɾ]/

Sideways
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/sai[d]-wayz//ˈsaiː[ɾ].weiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sieve
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the short letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

– /sihv//sɪv/

Sight
– For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night” or “fright” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sigh-[t]//sʌiː.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

Sightedness
– For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night” or “fright” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a flap-t, then for the “-ed” suffix – since the root-word ends in the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” suffix turns into an i-schwa and the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/sigh-dih[d]-nihs//sʌiː.t.ə(ɪ)[ɾ].nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

Sign
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the “g” is silent

– /sain//saiːn/

Signage
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the first “g” is silent, and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAI-nih-dʒ//ˈsaiː.nə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable –

Signal
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SIH[G]-nəl//ˈsɪ[g].nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Signals
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like he letter “z”

/SIHG-nəl-z//ˈsɪg.nəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Signature
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIH[G]-nih-ch’r//ˈsɪ[g].nə(ɪ).tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Signed
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “g” is silent, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent

– /sain-d//saiːn.d/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Significant
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sih[g]-NIH-fih-kihn-[t]//sə(ɪ)[g].ˈnɪ.fə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Significantly
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “g” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “i” is short, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sih[g]-NIH-fih-kihn-[t]-lee/ – /sə(ɪ)[g].ˈnɪ.fə(ɪ).kə(ɪ)n.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Silence
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-ence” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAI-lihn-s//ˈsaiː.lə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Silent
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SAI-lihn-[t]//ˈsaiː.lə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a third syllable –

Silently
 – For this word, the “i” is long,for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SAI-lihn[t]-lee//ˈsaiː.lə(ɪ)n[t].liː/

Silk
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “k” ending is (sometimes) stopped

/sihl-[k]//ˈsɪl.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) act as a second syllble

Silky
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SIHL-kee//ˈsɪl.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Silver
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “e” disappears

/SIHL-v’r//ˈsɪl.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Similar
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into a true-schwa, and the “a” disappears

/SIH-mə-l’r//ˈsɪ.mə.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Similarities
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into a true-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /sih-mə-LAYR-ih-deez//sɪ.mə.ˈleɪɹ.ɪ.ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Similarity
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /sih-mə-LAYR-ih-dee//sɪ.mə.ˈleɪɹ.ɪ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Similarly
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” turns into a true-schwathe “a” disappears, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIH-mə-l’r-ly//ˈsɪ.mə.lɚ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Simple
 – For this word, the “i” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/SIHM-pəl//ˈsɪm.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Simplification
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the third “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sihm-plih-fih-KAY-shihn//ˌsɪ,plə(ɪ).fə(ɪ).ˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

Simplify
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/SIHM-plih-fai//ˈsɪm.plə(ɪ).faiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Simply
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIHM-plee//ˈsɪm.pliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Simulate
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ate” suffix –, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIHM-yoo-lay[t]//ˈsə(ɪ)m.ju.le[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Simulating
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SIHM-yoo-lay-ding//ˈsə(ɪ)m.ju.le.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Simulation
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh”combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sihm-yoo-LAY-shihn//sə(ɪ)m.ju.ˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n / – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Simultaneously
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “u” turns into a true-schwathe “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “e” is long, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /sai-məl-TAY-nee-uhs-lee//saiː.məl.ˈteiː.niː.ə(ɪ)s.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Since
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent

– /sihns//sɪns/

Sincere
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/sihn-SEER/ – /sə(ɪ)n.ˈsiːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Sincerely
 – For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the first “e” is long, the second “e” disappears, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sihn-SEER-lee/ – /sə(ɪ)n.ˈsiːɹ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Sincerity
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final”y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sihn-SAYR-ih-dee//sə(ɪ)n.ˈseɪɹ.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Sinewy
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ew” combination sounds like the pronoun “you”, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /SIHN-you-ee//ˈsɪn.ju.iː/ – Notice that the stress is on the second syllable

Sing
 – For this word, the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/sing//sɪŋ/

Singer
 – For this word, the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SING-’r//ˈsɪŋ.ɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Singers
 – For this word, the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /SING-’r-z//ˈsɪŋ.ɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Singing
 – For this word, the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix)

– /SING-ing//ˈsɪŋ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Single
 – For this word, and the “-in” combination is pronounced like in the word “wing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the “g” is hard (it is pronounced separately from the “in” combination), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “g” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/SING-gəl//ˈsɪŋ.gəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Singular
 – For this word, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination, the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “in” combination, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “You”, and the “a” disappears

/SING-gyoo-l’r//ˈsɪŋ.gju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sink
 – For this word, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly behind it), and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/sing-[k]//sɪŋ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Sinusitis
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, the second “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the last “i” is an i-schwa

– /sai-nihs-IGH-dihs//ˌsaiː.nə(ɪ)s.ʌiː.ɾɪs/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that  the major stress is on the third syllable –

Sir
 – For this word, the “i” disappears

/d’r//sɚ/

Sister
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SIHS-t’r//ˈsɪs.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Sit
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sih[t]//sɪ[t]/

Site
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/sigh[t]//sʌiː[t]/

Sites
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “e” is silent

/sigh-ts//sʌiː.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Situation
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “u” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /sih-choo-WAY-shihn//sɪ.tʃu.weiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Situations
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it) the “u” is long, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “u” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /sih-choo-AY-shihn//sɪ.tʃu.eiː.ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fifth syllable –

Six
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/sih-ks/ – /sɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable –

Sixteen
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and for the “-teen” suffix – the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination and this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/sih-ks-TEEN//sɪ.ks.ˈtiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Sixth
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/sih-ks-th/ – /sɪ.ks.th/ – Notice also that the “ks” combination and the “th” ending act as separate syllables –

Sixty
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/SIH-ks-tee//ˈsɪ.ks.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” sound acts as a separate syllable –

Sixty-Six
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the first “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “i” is short, and the final “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/sih-ks-tee-SIH-ks//sɪ.ks.tiː.ˈsɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and the that both “ks” sounds act as separate syllables –

Size
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/saiz//saiːz/ –  –

Sk

Ski
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /skee/ – /skiː/ – 

Skiing
 – For this word, the first “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the two letters “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix n The Common Tongue)

– /SKEE-ying//ˈskiː.yɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Skill
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/skihl//skɪl/

Skilled
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/skihl.[d]//skɪl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Skillful
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SKIHL-fəl//ˈskɪl.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Skim
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/skihm//skɪm/

Skimming
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SKIH-ming//skɪ.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Skin
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/skihn//skɪn/

Skirt
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sk’r[t]//skɚ[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Sky
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/skai//skaiː/

Skyscraper
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SKAI-skray-p’r//ˈskaiː.skɹeiː.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Skyscrapers
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/SKAI-skray-p’rz//ˈskaiː.skɹeiː.pɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Skype
 – For this name, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “p” is (often) “stopped”, and the final “e” is silent

/skigh[p]/ – /skʌiː[p]/ –

Sl

Slack
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” but at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/slæ-[k]/ – /slæ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Slacker
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SLæ-k’r/ – /slæ.kɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Slacks
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/slæ-ks//slæ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable –

Slam
 – For this word, the “a” is short

– /slæm/ – /slæm/ –

Slammed
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “m” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is almost stopped

– /slæm-[d]/ – /slæm.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Slander
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “e” disappears

– /SLæN-d’r/ – /ˈslæn.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Slang
– For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “ring” or “rang” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/slæng//slæŋ/

Slap
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/slæ[p]/ – /slæ[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Slapstick
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) – however, the “k” is (often) stopped

/SLæ[P]-stih[k]//ˈslæ[p].stɪ[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Slash
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/slæ-sh//slæ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” ending acts as a second syllable –

Slashing
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SLæ-shing//ˈslæ.ʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Slave
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/slayv//sleiːv/

Sled
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/sleh[d]/ – /slɛ[ɾ]/ –

Sledding
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced like the single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SLEH-ding/ – /ˈslɛ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Sleep
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/slee[p]//sliː[p]/ – Notice also that –

Sleepiness
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SLEE-pee-nihs/ – /ˈsliː.piː.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Sleeve
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/sleev//sliːv/ –

Slept
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

/sleh[p]-[t]//slɛ[p].[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Slice
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounce like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/slighs//slʌiːs/

Slid
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/slih[d]//slɪ[ɾ]/

Slide
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/slai[d]/ – /slaiː[d]/

Slight
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night” or “light” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/sligh[t]//slʌiː[t]/

Slightly
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “night, or “light” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is (often)  stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SLIGH[T]-lee/ – /ˈslʌiː.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Slip
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/slih[p]//slɪ[p]/

Slipped
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending, is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/SLIH[P]-t/ – /ˈslɪ[p].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Slither
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “th” combination is voiced, and the “e” disappears

/SLIH-th’r/ – /ˈslɪ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Slogan
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “g” is hard, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/SLOH-gihn/ – /ˈslo.gə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Slope
 – For this word, the “o” is long. the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/sloh[p]//slo[p]/

Slouch
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination

/slow-ch/ – /slau.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending act as a second syllable –

Slouched
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and since the root-word ends with the “ch” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/slow-ch-t/ – /slau.tʃ.t/ – Notice also that the “ch” and the “t” ending act as separate syllables –

Slow
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/sloh//slo/

Slowly
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SLOH-lee/ – /ˈslo.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Sm

Smack
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /smæ-k/ – /smæ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Smacking
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /SMæ-king/ – /ˈsmæ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Small
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/smawl//smɔl/

Smart
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/smahr-[t]//smɑɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Smash
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/smæ-sh//smæ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” combination acts as a second syllable

Smell
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/smehl//smɛl/

Smile
 – For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” and phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/SMAI-yəl//ˈsmaiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Smoke
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/smoh[k]//smo[k]/

Smoking
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SMOH-king//ˈsmo.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Smooth
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “th” combination is voiced

/smooth//smuð/

Smoothly
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “th” combination is voiced, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/SMOOTH-lee//ˈsmuð.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter S ) –

(Go To Sn – Sz)


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