– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter T:  Te ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Te

 

Ta . Th . Ti . To . Tr . Ts . Tu . Tv . Tw . Ty

Tea
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/tee//tiː/

 

Teach
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/tee-ch//tiː.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Teacher
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-er” suffix – the second “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEE-ch’r//ˈtiː.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Teachers
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, for the “-er” suffix – the second “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/TEE-ch’r-z//ˈtiː.tʃɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as third syllable

 

Teaching
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEE-ching//ˈtiː.tʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Team
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/teem//tiːm/

 

Tear (noun)
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/teer//tiːɹ/

 

Tear (verb)
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong

/tayr//teɪɹ/

 

Tears (noun)
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/teer-z//tiːɹ.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Tech
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”

/tehk//tɛk/

 

Technical
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEH[K]-nih-kəl//ˈtɛ[k].nə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Technician
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (often) stopped, the first “i” is short, and for the “-cian” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEH[K]-nih-shihn//ˈtɛ[k].nə(ɪ).ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Technicians
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (often) stopped, the first “i” is short, for the “-cian” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/TEH[K]-nih-shihn.z//ˈtɛ[k].nə(ɪ).ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Technique
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced the simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (often) stopped, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, and the final “e” is silent

/teh[k]-NEEK//tɛ[k].ˈniːk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Techniques
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (often) stopped, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, and the second “e” is silent

/teh[k]-NEE-ks//tɛ[k].ˈniː.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Technological
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (often) stopped, the first “o” turns into an true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/teh[k]-nə-LAH-dʒih-kəl//tɛ[k].nə.ˈlɑ.dʒə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Technologically
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (often) stopped, the first “o” turns into an true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/teh[k]-nə-LAH-dʒih[k]-lee//tɛ[k].nə.ˈlɑ.dʒə(ɪ)[k].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Technology
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, for the “-ology” suffix – the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/tehk-NAH-lə-dʒee//tɛk.ˈnɑ.lə.dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Techno-phobe
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is long, the “b” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/TEH[K]-nə-foh[b]//ˈtɛ[k].nə.fo[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Tedious
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEE-dee-ihs//ˈtiː.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Teenager
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEEN-ay-dʒ’r//ˈtiːn.eiː.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Teenagers
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is long, the “g” is soft,for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/TEEN-ay-dʒ’r-z//ˈtiːn.eiː.dʒɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Teeth
– For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/tee-th//tiː.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Teleconference
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is short, the third “e” disappears, the fourth “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/TEH-lə-kahn-frihns//ˈtɛ.lə.kɑn.fɹə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Telephone
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/TEH-lə-fohn//ˈtɛ.lə.fon/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Television
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEH-lə-vih-zhihn//ˈtɛ.lə.vɪ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Tell
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/tehl//tɛl/

 

Temperature
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a short-u-schwa, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEHM-pruh-ch’r//ˈtɛm.pɹə(ʌ).tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Template
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/TEHM-play[t]//ˈtɛm.ple[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Templates
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and the second “e” is silent

/TEHM-play-ts//ˈtɛm.ple.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Temporary
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TEHM-pə-rayr-ee//ˈtɛm.pə.ɹeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Tempting
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “p” is stopped, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEHM[P]-ting//ˈtɛm[p].tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Tenacity
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is short, the “c” is soft, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/tə--sih-dee//tə.ˈnæ.sə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Tenant
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/TEH-nihn-[t]//ˈtɛ.nə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “t” acts as a third syllable

 

Ten
– For this word, the “e” is short

/tehn//tɛn/

 

Tend
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/tehn-[d]//tɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Tendencies
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/TEHN-dihn-seez//ˈtɛn.də(ɪ)n.seez/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Tendency
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TEHN-dihn-see//ˈtɛn-də(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Tension
– For this word, the “e” is short, – , and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEHN-shihn//ˈtɛnʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Tent
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/tehn-[t]//tɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Tenth
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “th” combination

/tehn-th//tɛn.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Term
– For this word, the “e” disappears

/t’r-m//tɚ.m/ – Notice also that the “m” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Terminals
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, the “i” is an i-schwa, the for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/T’R-mih-nəl-z//ˈtɚ.mə(ɪ).nəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Terms
– For this word, the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/t’r-m-z//tɚ.m.z/ – Notice also that the “m” and the “s” act as separate syllables

 

Terrace
– For this word, the “e” is pronounce like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/TAYR-ihs//ˈteɪɹ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Terrarium
– For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “u” is a u-schwa

/tə-RAYR-ee-uhm//tə.ɹeɪɹ.iː.ʌm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Terribly
– For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the long “A” / Short “I” Diphtong, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ily” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/TAYR-ih-blee//ˈteɪɹ.ə(ɪ).bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Terrible
– For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the long “A” / Short “I” Diphtong, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-
schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TAYR-ih-bəl//ˈteɪɹ.ə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Terrify
– For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the long “A” / Short “I” Diphtong, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/TAYR-ih-fai//ˈteɪɹ.ə(ɪ).faiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Terrifying
– For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the long “A” / Short “I” Diphtong, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the second “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TAYR-ih-fai-ying//ˈteɪɹ.ə(ɪ).faiː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Test
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/tehs-[t]//tɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Testament
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEHS-tə-mihn-[t]//ˈtɛs.tə.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Testimony
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TEHS-tih-moh-nee//ˈtɛs.tə(ɪ).mo.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Tests
– For this word, the “e” is short

/TEHS-ts//ˈtɛs.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Text
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/teh-ks-[t]//tɛ.ks.[t]/ – Notice also that the “ks” combination and the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Textbook
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “t” is almost stopped, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “put” or “foot”), and the final “k” is (sometimes) stopped

/teh-ks-[t]-bəih[k]//tɛ.ks.[t].bəɪ[k]/ – Notice also that the “ks” combination and the “t” act as separate syllables

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter T ) –


Jump To…

Aa . Bb . Cc . Dd . Ee . Ff . Gg . Hh . Ii . Jj . Kk . Ll . Mm . Nn . Oo . Pp . Qq . Rr . Ss . Tt . Uu . Vv . Ww . Xx . Yy . Zz
Numbers

 


 

Explore GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!

Leave a Reply

Yo!