– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter T:  Th ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Th

 

Ta . Te . Ti . To . Tr . Ts . Tu . Tv . Tw . Ty

Thai
– For this word, the “Th” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “T”, and the “ai” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i”

/tai//taiː/

 

Thailand
– For this word, the “Th” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “T”, and the “ai” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i”, and for the “-land” suffix – the “a” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/TAI-læn-[d]//ˈtaiː.læn.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Than
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the final “a” is short

/thæn//ðæn/

 

Thank
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the “k” directly after it), and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/thæng-[k]//ˈθæŋ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Thanked
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the “k” directly after it), the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/thæng[k]-t//ˈθæŋ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Thankful
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THæNG-k-fəl//ˈθæŋ.k.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Thanks
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/thæn.ks//ˈθæŋ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Than
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the “a” is short

/thæn//ðæn/

 

That
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/thæ[t]//ðæ[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

That’s
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the “a” is short

/THæ-ts//ˈðæ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” combination acts as a second syllable

 

The
– For this word, the “th” combination is voiced, and the final “e” either turns into a true-schwa (usually before words starting with a consonant sound) or is long (usually before words starting with a vowel sound)

/thuh//ðʌ/ – Or – /thee//ðiː/ –

 

Theater
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “e” and “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is s flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THEE-yih-d’r//ˈθiː.jə(ɪ).ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Theatre
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “e” and “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is s flap-t, and the final “e” is silent

/THEE-yih-d’r//ˈθiː.jə(ɪ).ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Theft
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/thehf-ts//ˈθɛf.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Thefts
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “e” is short

/THEHF-ts//ˈθɛf.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

 

Their
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong

/thayr//ðeɪɹ/

 

Their’s
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/thayr-z//ðeɪɹ.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Them
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the “e” is short

/thehm//ðɛm/

 

Theme
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the first “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/theem//θiːm/

 

Themselves
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the third “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/thəm-SEHL-v-z//ðəm.ˈsɛl.v.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “v” and the “z” ending act as separate syllables

 

Then
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the “e” is short

/thehn//ðɛn/

 

Theorem
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the first “e” is long, the “o” is long, and the second “e” turns into a true-schwa

/thee-OHR-əm//θiː.o.ˈɹəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Theoretical
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the first “e” is long, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/thee-ə-REH-dih-kəl//θiː.ə.ˈɹɛ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Theoretically
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the first “e” is long, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the second “e” is short, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/thee-uh-REH-dihk-lee//θiː.ə(ʌ).ˈɹɛ.ɾə(ɪ)k.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Theories
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “eo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/THEER-eez//ˈθiːɹ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

 

Theory
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “eo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/THEER-ee//ˈθiːɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Therapist
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THAYR-uh-pihs-[t]//ˈθeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).pə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the stress is on the first syllable

 

Therapy
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/THAYR-uh-pee//ˈθeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the stress is on the first syllable

 

There
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/thayr//ðeɪɹ/

 

Therefore
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the second “e” is silent, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/THAYR-fohr//ˈðeɪɹ.foɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the stress is on the first syllable

 

There’s
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the second “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/thayr-z//ðeɪɹ.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Thermal
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TH’R-məl//ˈθɚ.məl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

These
– For this word, the “Th” is voiced, the first “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/theez//ðiːz/ –

 

They
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the “ey” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/thay//ðeiː/

 

Thick
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/thih-[k]//θɪ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Thickness
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced,” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THI[K]-nihs//ˈθɪ[k].nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Thief
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/theef//θiːf/

 

Thin
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “i” is short

/thihn//θɪn/

 

Thing
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/thing//θɪŋ/

 

Things
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/thing-z//θɪŋ.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Think
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/thing-k//θɪŋ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Thinking
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THING-king//ˈθɪŋ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Third
– For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/th’r-[d]//θɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Thirsty
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TH’R-s-tee//ˈθɚ.s.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Thirteen
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, and for the “-teen” suffix – the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/th’r-TEEN//θɚ.ˈtiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Thirty
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TH’R-dee//ˈθɚ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Thirty-Eight
– This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “Ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “gh” combination is silent, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/th’r-dee-AY[T]//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈeiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Thirty-Five
– This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/th’r-dee-FAIV//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈfaiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Thirty-Four
– This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/th’r-dee-FOHR//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈfoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Thirty-Nine
– This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/th’r-dee-NAIN//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈnaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Thirty-One
– This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “y” and the “O” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “O” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/th’r-dee-WUHN//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈwʌn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Thirty-Seven
– This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “e” is short, and the third “e” turns into an i-schwa

/th’r-dee-SEH-vihn//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈsɛ.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Thirty-Six
– This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “i” is short, and the final “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/th’r-dee-SI-ks//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈsɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

Thirty-Three
– This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/th’r-dee-THREE//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈθɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Thirty-Two
– This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “wo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/th’r-dee-TOO//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈtu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

This
– For this word, the “Th” is voiced, and the “i” is short

/thihs//ðɪs/

 

Thorough
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the first “o” disappears, and the “ough” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/TH’R-oh//ˈθɚ.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Thoroughfare
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the first “o” disappears, the “ough” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/TH’R-oh-fayr//ˈθɚ.o.feɪɹ/ – Notice also the stress is on the first syllable

 

Thoroughly
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the first “o” disappears, the “ough” combination turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TH’R-ə-lee//ˈθɚ.ə.feɪɹliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Those
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/thohz//ðoz/ –

 

Thou
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination

/thow//ðɑu/

 

Though
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the “ough” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/thoh//ðo/

 

Thought
– For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, and the “ough” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/thaw[t]//θɔ[t]/

 

Thoughtful
– For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, and the “ough” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the second “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/thaw[t]-fəl//θɔ[t].fəl/

 

Thoughts
– For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, and the “ough” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination

/thaw-ts//θɔ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Thousand
– For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/THOW-zihn-[d]//ˈθau.zə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts like a third syllable

 

Thousandth
– For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “th” combination is un-voiced

/THOW-zihn-[d]-th//ˈθau.zə(ɪ)n.[d].θ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” (when not stopped) and the “th” ending act as separate syllables

 

Thread
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/threh[d]//θɹɛ[ɾ]/

 

Threads
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced amost like the letter “z”

/threh-dz//θɹɛ.ɾz/ – Notice also that the “dz” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Threat
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/threh-[t]//θɹɛ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Threaten
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard
pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THREH[T]-ihn//ˈθɹɛ[t].ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Threatened
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second “t” is (often) stopped, the second “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the the final “d” is (often) stopped

/THREH[T]-ihn-[d]//ˈθɹɛ[t].ə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Threatening
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second “t” is (often) stopped, the second “e” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THREH[T]-ning//ˈθɹɛ[t].nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Threats
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”

/THREH-ts//ˈθɹɛ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Three
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/three//θɹiː/

 

Thrill
– For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, the “i” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/thrihl//θɹɪl/

 

Thrilling
– For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, the “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THRIH-ling//ˈθɹɪ.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Thrive
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/thrai-v//θɹaiː.v/ – Notice also that the “v” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Throat
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/throh[t]//θɹo[t]/

 

Through
– For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, and the “ough” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/throo//θɹu/ –

 

Throughout
– For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, the “ough” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “h” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the second “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/throo-WOW[T]//θɹu.ˈwɑu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Throw
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/throh//θɹo/

 

Thumb
– For this word, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “u” is short, and the final “b” is silent (just pretend that the “b” is not even there)

/thuhm//θʌm/

 

Thunder
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “u” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THUHN-d’r//ˈθʌn.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Thursday
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “u” disappears, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-day” suffix – the final “ay” combination is pronounced simply like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TH’R-z-day//ˈθɚ.z.deiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” acts as a separate syllable

 

Thus
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the “u” is short

/thuhs//ðʌs/

 

Thwart
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, the the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/thwohr-[t]//θwoɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Thwarting
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THWOHR-ding//ˈθwoɹ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter T ) –


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