– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter T:  Tr ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Tr

 

Ta . Te . Th . Ti . To . Ts . Tu . Tv . Tw . Ty

Trace
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/chrays//tʃɹeiːs/

 

Track
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chræ[k]//ˈtʃɹæ[k]/

 

Tracked
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/chræk-t//tʃɹæk.t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Trade
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “e” is silent

/chray[d]//ˈtʃɹe[ɾ]/

 

Traded
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ch-RAY-dih[d]//ˈtʃɹeiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Trader
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRAY-d’r//ˈtʃɹeiː.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Trading
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRAY-ding//ˈtʃɹe.ɾɪŋ/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Tradition
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chruh-DIH-shihn//ˈtʃɹʌ.dɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/– Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Traditional
–For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chruh-DIH-shih-nəl//ˈtʃɹʌ.dɪ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Traffic
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it),” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRæ-fih[k]//ˈtʃɹæ.fə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Train
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chrayn//ˈtʃɹeiːn/

 

Trainer
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRAY-n’r//ˈtʃɹeiː.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Trainers
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/CHRAY-n’r-z//ˈtʃɹeiː.nɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Training
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRAY-ning//ˈtʃɹeiː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Trait
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/chray[t]//tʃɹeiː[t]/

 

Traits
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chray-ts//tʃɹeiː.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Tram
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “a” is short

/chræm//tʃɹæm/

 

Tranquil
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the “qu” combination directly after it), the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination, and “i” turns into an true-schwa

/CHRæNG-kwəl//ˈtʃɹæŋ.kwəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Transcript
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “p” is (usually) stopped

/CHRæN-skrih[p]-t//ˈtʃɹæn.skɹə(ɪ)[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Transfer
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRæN-s-f’r//ˈtʃɹæn.s.fɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Transform
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, and the “o” is long

/CHRæN-s-fohrm//ˈtʃɹæn.s.foɹm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

 

Transgress
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the first “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “g” is hard, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combinatio is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chræn-z-GREHS//tʃɹæn.z.ˈgɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Transgression
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the first “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “g” is hard, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination combines with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-sion” suffix (with the addition of the extra letter “s”) – the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the voiced version of the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chræn-z-GREH-shihn//tʃɹæn.z.ˈgɹɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Transition
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chræn-ZIH-shihn//tʃɹæn.ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Translate
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRæN-z-lay[t]//ˈtʃɹæn.z.le[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Translation
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chræn-z-LAY-shihn//tʃɹæn.z.ˈle.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Translator
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRæN-z-lay-d’r//tʃɹæn.z.leiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Transmit
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/chræn-z-MIH[T]//tʃɹæn.z.ˈmɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Transparent
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is
(often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chræn-z-PAYR-ihn-[t]//tʃɹæn.z.ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” and the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Transport
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/CHRæN-z-pohr-[t]//ˈtʃɹæn.z.poɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” and the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

 

Transportation
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “o” disappears, the second “a” is is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chræn-z-p’r-TAY-shihn//tʃɹæn.z.pɚ.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Trap
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/chræ[p]//ˈtʃɹæ[p]/

 

Trapped
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/chræ[p]-t//tʃɹæ[p].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Trash
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/chræ-sh//ˈtʃɹæ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Trashy
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/CHRæ-shee//ˈtʃɹæ.ʃiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Travel
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “Ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/CHRæ-vəl//ˈtʃɹæ.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Travelled
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “Ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/CHRæ-vəl-[d]//ˈtʃɹæ.vəl.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as a third syllable

 

Traveller
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRæ-və-l’r//ˈtʃɹæ.və.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Travelling
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRæ-və-ling//ˈtʃɹæ.və.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Travels
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “Ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/CHRæ-vəl-z//ˈtʃɹæ.vəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Traverse
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/chruh-V’R-s//tʃɹə(ʌ).ˈvɚ.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Treacherous
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second “e” disappears, and for the “ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHREH-ch’r-ihs//ˈtʃɹɛ.tʃɚ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Treasure
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/CHREH-zh’r//ˈtʃɹɛ.ʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Treasurer
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, there is a phantom letter “r” in-between the first “r” and the letter “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHREH-zh’r-r’r//ˈtʃɹɛ.ʒɚ.ɹɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Treat
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the second “t” is (usually) stopped

/chree[t]//tʃɹiː[t]/

 

Treating
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHREE-ding//ˈtʃɹiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Treatment
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHREE[T]-mihn-[t]//ˈtʃɹeiː[t].mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and the final “t” (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

 

Tree
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chree//ˈtʃɹiː/

 

Trembling
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHREHM-bling//ˈtʃɹɛm.blɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Tremendous
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chrə-MEHN-dihs//tʃɹə.ˈmɛn.də(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Tremendously
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chrə-MEHN-dihs-lee//tʃɹə.ˈmɛn.də(ɪ)s.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Trend
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “e” is short, and the final “d” if (often) stopped

/chrehn-[d]//tʃɹɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Trial
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/CHRAI-əl//tʃɹaiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Triangle
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “g” directly after it), the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “ng” sound of the letter “n”), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “g” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/TRAI-yæng-gəl//ˈtʃɹaiː.jæŋ.gəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Tribal
– For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/CHRAI-bəl//ˈtʃɹaiː.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Trick
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chrih[k]//ˈtʃɹɪ[k]/

 

Tricky
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/CHRIH-kee//ˈtʃɹɪ.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Trigger
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRIH-g’r//ˈtʃɹɪ.gɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Trillion
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/CHRIH-lee-yihn//ˈtʃɹɪ.liː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Trip
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/chrih[p]//ˈtʃɹɪ[p]/

 

Triple
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/CHRIH-pəl//ˈtʃɹɪ.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Tripled
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/CHRIH-pəl-[d]//ˈtʃɹɪ.pəl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Triskaidekaphobia
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “Ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “i” is short, the “ai” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “i”, the “e” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the third “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there ia a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the letter “i” and the final “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/chrihs-kai-deh-kuh-FOH-bee-uh//ˌtʃɹə(ɪ)s.kaiː.ˌdɛ.kə(ʌ).ˈfo.biː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that there are minor stresses on the first and third syllable and that the major stress is on the fifth syllable

 

Trite
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “t” is (often) stopped, and the the final “e” is silent

/chrigh[t]//tʃɹʌiː[t]/

 

Triumph
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is long, the “u” is a u-schwa, and the “ph” combination is pronounced like a “pf” combination but the “p” is almost stopped

/CHRAI-uhm-[p]f//ˈtʃɹaiː.ə(ʌ)m[p]f/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Triumphs
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is long, the “u” is a u-schwa, and the “ph” combination is pronounced like a “pf” combination but the “p” is (almost) stopped

/CHRAI-uhm-[p]f//ˈtʃɹaiː.ə(ʌ)m.[p]f/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Trope
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it),  the “o” is long, the “p” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/chroh[p]//tʃɹo[p]/ –

 

Trophy
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “o” is long, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/CHROH-fee//ˈtʃɹo.fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Tropical
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRAH-pih-kəl//ˈtʃɹɑ.pə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Trouble
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/CHRUH-bəl//ˈtʃɹʌ.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Troupe
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/chroo[p]//tʃɹu[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Trousers
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the first “s” is pronounced like the almost letter “z”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/CHROW-z’r-z//ˈtʃɹau.zɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Truck
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “u” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chruh[k]//ˈtʃɹʌ[k]/

 

Trucks
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “u” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chruh-ks//ˈtʃɹʌ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” combination acts as a separate syllable

 

True
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/chroo//ˈtʃɹu/

 

Truly
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “u” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/CHROO-lee//ˈtʃɹu.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Trunk
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/chruhng-k//tʃɹʌŋ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Trust
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/chruhs-[t]//tʃɹʌs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

 

Trustworthiness
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “u” is short, the second “t” is (often) stopped, the “o” disappears, the “th” combination is voiced, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRUHS-[t]-w’r-thee-nihs//ˈtʃɹʌs.[t].wɚ.ðiː.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Trustworthy
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “u” is short, the second “t” is (often) stopped, the “o” disappears, the “th” combination is voiced, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/CHRUHS-[t]-w’r-thee//ˈtʃɹʌs.[t].wɚ.ðiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Truth
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “u” is long, and the final “th” combination is un-voiced

/chroo-th//ˈtʃɹu.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

 

Try
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/chrai//tʃɹaiː/

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter T ) –


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