– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter T ) –


 

An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Tt

 

Te . Th . Ti . To . Tr . Ts . Tu . Tw . Ty

 

Table
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/TAY-bəl/ – /ˈte.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Tablet
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “b” is almost stopped, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/[B]-lih-[t]/ – /ˈtæ[b].lə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Tabletop
 – This compound word is pronounced like two separate words, the “a” is a True Long “A”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, the “o” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/TAY-bəl-tah[p]/ – /ˈte.bəl.tɑ[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Taboo
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like in the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/tæ-BOO//tæ.ˈbu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Tackle
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “k” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/-kəl/ – /ˈtæ.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Tail
 – For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it) 

/tayl/ – /teɪl/ –

Take
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/tay-[k]/ – /te.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Taken
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” turns into an i-schwa

/TAY-kihn/ – /ˈte.kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Taking
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /TAY-king//ˈte.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Talent
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/-lihn-[t]//ˈtæ.lə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Talk
– For this word the “al” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination

– /taw-k/ – /tɔ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Talked
 – For this word, the “al” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/taw-[k]-t/ – /tɔ.[k].t/ – Notice also that the “k” (when not stopped) & the “t” ending act as separate syllables –

Tall
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/tawl/ – /tɔl/ –

Tangentially
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “g” is soft, the “e” is short, and for the “-tial” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the “l” combines with the “-ly” suffix, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/tæn-GEHN-shə-lee//tæn.ˈdʒɛn.ʃə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Tangible
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “g” is soft, and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TæN-dʒih-bəl//ˈtæn.dʒə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tank
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/tæng-k/ – /tæŋ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Tanzania
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/tæn-zuh-NEE-yuh//tæn.zə(ʌ).ˈniː.jə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Tanzanian
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the second “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a”, and the final “a” turns into an i-schwa

/tæn-zuh-NEE-yihn//tæn.zə(ʌ).ˈniː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Tap
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/tæ-[p]/ – /tæ.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Tape
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/tay-[p]/ – /te.[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Target
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /TAHR-gih-[t]//ˈtɑɹ.gə(ɪ).[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Targeted
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/TAHR-gih-dih[d]/ – /ˈtɑɹ.gə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Targets
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “g” is hard, the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/TAHR-gih-ts/ – /ˈtɑɹ.gə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

Tariff
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/TAYR-ihf//ˈteɪɹ.ə(ɪ)f/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tarnish
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for this “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

– /TAHR-nihsh//ˈtɑɹ.nɪʃ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Tarnished
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, for this “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the un-voiced “sh” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

– /TAHR-nihsh-[t]//ˈtɑɹ.nɪʃ.[t]/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Tarnishing
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and for this “-ish” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /TAHR-nih-shing//ˈtɑɹ.nɪ.ʃɪŋ/ –Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Task
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/tæ-s[k]/ – /tæ.s[k]/ – Notice also that the “sk” ending (even when the “k” is stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Tasks
 – For this word, the “a” is short

– /tæs-ks/ – /tæs-ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

Taste
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /tays-[t]//teiːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Tasted
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/TAYS-tih[d]/ – /teiːs.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Tasting
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /TAYS-ting//ˈteiːs.tɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Tasty
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TAYS-tee//ˈteiːs.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tattle
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/-dəl/ – /ˈtæ.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Taught
 – For this word, the “augh” combination is pronounced like an “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/taw-[t]/ – /tɔ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Tax
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/tæ-ks/ – /tæ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable –

Taxes
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/TæK-sih-z//ˈtæk.sə(ɪ).z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Taxi
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the final “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TæK-see/ – /ˈtæk.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Te

Tea
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/tee/ – /tiː/ –

Teach
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/tee-ch//tiː.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Teacher
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-er” suffix – the second “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEE-ch’r//ˈtiː.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Teachers
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, for the “-er” suffix – the second “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/TEE-ch’r-z//ˈtiː.tʃɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as third syllable –

Teaching
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEE-ching/ – /ˈtiː.tʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Team
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/teem//tiːm/

Tear (noun)
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/teer/ – /tiːɹ/ –

Tear (verb)
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong

/tayr/ – /teɪɹ/ –

Tears (noun)
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /teer-z//tiːɹ.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

Tech
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”

/tehk//tɛk/

Technical
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (usually) stopped, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEH[K]-nih-kəl/ – /ˈtɛ[k].nə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Technician
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (often) stopped, the first “i” is short,  and for the “-cian” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEH[K]-nih-shihn/ – /ˈtɛ[k].nə(ɪ).ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Technicians
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (often) stopped, the first “i” is short,  for the “-cian” suffix – the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/TEH[K]-nih-shihn.z/ – /ˈtɛ[k].nə(ɪ).ʃə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Technique
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced the simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (often) stopped, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, and the final “e” is silent

/teh[k]-NEEK/ – /tɛ[k].ˈniːk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Techniques
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (often) stopped, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k”, and the second “e” is silent

/teh[k]-NEE-ks/ – /tɛ[k].ˈniː.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a third syllable –

Technological
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (often) stopped, the first “o” turns into an true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

– /teh[k]-nə-LAH-dʒih-kəl//tɛ[k].nə.ˈlɑ.dʒə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that  the stress is on the third syllable

Technologically
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c” but is (often) stopped, the first “o” turns into an true-schwa, the second “o” is short, the “g” is soft, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, and for the “-ally suffix – the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /teh[k]-nə-LAH-dʒih[k]-lee//tɛ[k].nə.ˈlɑ.dʒə(ɪ)[k].liː/ – Notice also that  the stress is on the third syllable

Technology
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, for the “-ology” suffix – the first “o” is short, the second “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /tehk-NAH-lə-dʒee//tɛk.ˈnɑ.lə.dʒiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Techno-phobe
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “ch” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “o” is long, the “b” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/TEH[K]-nə-foh[b]//ˈtɛ[k].nə.fo[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tedious
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /TEE-dee-ihs//ˈtiː.ɾiː.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Teenager
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEEN-ay-dʒ’r/ – /ˈtiːn.eiː.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Teenagers
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is long, the “g” is soft,for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/TEEN-ay-dʒ’r-z/ – /ˈtiːn.eiː.dʒɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Teeth
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “th” combination is un-voiced

– /tee-th//tiː.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable –

Teleconference
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is short, the third “e” disappears, the fourth “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /TEH-lə-kahn-frihns//ˈtɛ.lə.kɑn.fɹə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Telephone
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/TEH-lə-fohn//ˈtɛ.lə.fon/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Television
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /TEH-lə-vih-zhihn//ˈtɛ.lə.vɪ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Tell
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/tehl//tɛl/

Temperature
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a short-u-schwa, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /TEHM-pruh-ch’r//ˈtɛm.pɹə(ʌ).tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Template
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/TEHM-play[t]//ˈtɛm.ple[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Templates
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and the second “e” is silent

/TEHM-play-ts//ˈtɛm.ple.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a separate syllable

Temporary
– For this word, the “e” is short, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TEHM-pə-rayr-ee//ˈtɛm.pə.ɹeɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Tenant
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/TEH-nihn-[t]//ˈtɛ.nə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the final “t” acts as a third syllable –

Ten
 – For this word, the “e” is short

/tehn//tɛn/

Tend
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/tehn-[d]//tɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Tendencies
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/TEHN-dihn-seez//ˈtɛn.də(ɪ)n.seez/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Tendency
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TEHN-dihn-see//ˈtɛn-də(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tension
 – For this word, the “e” is short,  – , and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEHN-shihn//ˈtɛnʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tent
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/tehn-[t]//tɛn.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Tenth
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “th” combination

/tehn-th//tɛn.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Term
 – For this word, the “e” disappears

/t’r-m//tɚ.m/ – Notice also that the “m” ending acts as a second syllable

Terms
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/t’r-m-z/ – /tɚ.m.z/ – Notice also that the “m” and the “s” act as separate syllables

Terrace
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounce like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/TAYR-ihs//ˈteɪɹ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Terrarium
 – For this word, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “rr” combination is pronounced like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “u” is a u-schwa

/tə-RAYR-ee-uhm/ – /tə.ɹeɪɹ.iː.ʌm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Terribly
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the long “A” / Short “I” Diphtong, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ily” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/TAYR-ih-blee//ˈteɪɹ.ə(ɪ).bliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Terrible
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the long “A” / Short “I” Diphtong, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, there is a phantom-
schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /TAYR-ih-bəl//ˈteɪɹ.ə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Terrify
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the long “A” / Short “I” Diphtong, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

– /TAYR-ih-fai//ˈteɪɹ.ə(ɪ).faiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Terrifying
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the long “A” / Short “I” Diphtong, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the second “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /TAYR-ih-fai-ying//ˈteɪɹ.ə(ɪ).faiː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Test
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/tehs-[t]//tɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Testament
– For this word, the first “e” is short, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TEHS-tə-mihn-[t]//ˈtɛs.tə.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Tests
 – For this word, the “e” is short

– /TEHS-ts//ˈtɛs.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Text
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/teh-ks-[t]//tɛ.ks.[t]/ – Notice also that the “ks” combination and the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

Textbook
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “t” is almost stopped, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (like in the word “put” or “foot”), and the final “k” is (sometimes) stopped

/teh-ks-[t]-bəih[k]//tɛ.ks.[t].bəɪ[k]/ – Notice also that the “ks” combination and the “t” act as separate syllables

Th

Thai
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “T”, and the “ai” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i”

/tai//taiː/

Thailand
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “T”, and the “ai” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i”, and for the “-land” suffix – the “a” is short, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/TAI-læn-[d]//ˈtaiː.læn.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Than
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the final “a” is short

/thæn//ðæn/

Thank
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the “k” directly after it), and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/thæng-[k]/ – /ˈθæŋ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Thanked
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the “k” directly after it), the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/thæng[k]-t/ – /ˈθæŋ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Thankful
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THæNG-k-fəl//ˈθæŋ.k.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Thanks
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/thæn.ks//ˈθæŋ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” ending acts as a second syllable

Than
– For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the “a” is short

/thæn//ðæn/

That
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

– /thæ[t]//ðæ[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

That’s
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the “a” is short

– /THæ-ts/ – /ˈðæ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” combination acts as a second syllable –

The
 – For this word, the “th” combination is voiced, and the final “e” either turns into a true-schwa (usually before words starting with a consonant sound) or is long (usually before words starting with a vowel sound)

– /thuh//ðʌ/  – Or –  /thee/ – /ðiː/

Theater
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “e” and “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is s flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THEE-yih-d’r//ˈθiː.jə(ɪ).ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Theatre
– For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “e” and “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is s flap-t, and the final “e” is silent

/THEE-yih-d’r//ˈθiː.jə(ɪ).ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Theft
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is  short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/thehf-ts//ˈθɛf.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Thefts
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “e” is  short

/THEHF-ts//ˈθɛf.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Their
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong

/thayr//ðeɪɹ/

Their’s
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/thayr-z//ðeɪɹ.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Them
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the “e” is short

/thehm//ðɛm/

Theme
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the first “e” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/theem//θiːm/

Themselves
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, the third “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/thəm-SEHL-v-z//ðəm.ˈsɛl.v.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “v” and the “z” ending act as separate syllables –

Then
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the “e” is short

/thehn//ðɛn/ 

Theorem
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the first “e” is long, the “o” is long, and the second “e” turns into a true-schwa

/thee-OHR-əm//θiː.o.ˈɹəm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Theories
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “eo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/THEER-eez//ˈθiːɹ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Theory
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “eo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/THEER-ee//ˈθiːɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Therapist
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THAYR-uh-pihs-[t]//ˈθeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).pə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the stress is on the first syllable

Therapy
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/THAYR-uh-pee//ˈθeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the stress is on the first syllable

There
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/thayr//ðeɪɹ/

Therefore
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the second “e” is silent, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/THAYR-fohr//ˈðeɪɹ.foɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the stress is on the first syllable

There’s
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the second “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /thayr-z/ – /ðeɪɹ.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Thermal
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “e” disappears, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TH’R-məl//ˈθɚ.məl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

These
 – For this word, the “Th” is voiced, the first “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /theez/ – /ðiːz/ –

They
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the “ey” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/thay//ðeiː/

Thick
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/thih-[k]//θɪ.[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Thickness
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced,” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THI[K]-nihs//ˈθɪ[k].nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Thief
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /theef/ – /θiːf/

Thin
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “i” is short

/thihn//θɪn/

Thing
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/thing//θɪŋ/

Things
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “-ing” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /thing-z//θɪŋ.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

Think
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/thing-k//θɪŋ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Thinking
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “in” combination is pronounced like the “ing” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THING-king//ˈθɪŋ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Third
 – For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/th’r-[d]//θɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Thirsty
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TH’R-s-tee//ˈθɚ.s.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable

Thirteen
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, and for the “-teen” suffix – the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/th’r-TEEN//θɚ.ˈtiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Thirty
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TH’R-dee//ˈθɚ.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Thirty-Eight
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “Ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “gh” combination is silent, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/th’r-dee-AY[T]//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈeiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Thirty-Five
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/th’r-dee-FAIV//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈfaiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Thirty-Four
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/th’r-dee-FOHR//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈfoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Thirty-Nine
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/th’r-dee-NAIN//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈnaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Thirty-One
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “y” and the “O” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “O” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

/th’r-dee-WUHN//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈwʌn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Thirty-Seven
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “e” is short, and the third “e” turns into an i-schwa

/th’r-dee-SEH-vihn//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈsɛ.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Thirty-Six
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “i” is short, and the final “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

/th’r-dee-SI-ks//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈsɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Thirty-Three
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/th’r-dee-THREE//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈθɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Thirty-Two
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” disappears, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “wo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/th’r-dee-TOO//θɚ.ɾiː.ˈtu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

This
 – For this word, the “Th” is voiced, and the “i” is short

– /thihs/ – /ðɪs/ –

Thorough
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the first “o” disappears, and the “ough” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/TH’R-oh//ˈθɚ.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Thoroughfare
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the first “o” disappears, the “ough” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/TH’R-oh-fayr/ – /ˈθɚ.o.feɪɹ/ – Notice also the stress is on the first syllable

Thoroughly
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the first “o” disappears, the “ough” combination turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TH’R-ə-lee//ˈθɚ.ə.feɪɹliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Those
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the “o” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /thohz/ – /ðoz/ – 

Thou
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination

/thow//ðɑu/

Though
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, the “ough” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

/thoh//ðo/

Thought
 – For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, and the “ough” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /thaw[t]/ – /θɔ[t]/ –

Thoughtful
 – For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, and the “ough” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the second “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /thaw[t]-fəl/ – /θɔ[t].fəl/ –

Thoughts
 – For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, and the “ough” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination

– /thaw-ts/ – /θɔ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Thousand
 – For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /THOW-zihn-[d]//ˈθau.zə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts like a third syllable –

Thousandth
 – For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “th” combination is un-voiced

/THOW-zihn-[d]-th//ˈθau.zə(ɪ)n.[d].θ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” (when not stopped) and the “th” ending act as separate syllables

Thread
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/threh[d]//θɹɛ[ɾ]/

Threads
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced amost like the letter “z”

/threh-dz//θɹɛ.ɾz/ – Notice also that the “dz” ending acts as a second syllable

Threat
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /threh-[t]/ – /θɹɛ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Threaten
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard
pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THREH[T]-ihn//ˈθɹɛ[t].ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Threatened
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second  “t” is (often) stopped, the second “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /THREH[T]-ihn-[d]//ˈθɹɛ[t].ə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Threatening
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second  “t” is (often) stopped, the second “e” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THREH[T]-ning//ˈθɹɛ[t].nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Threats
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”

/THREH-ts//ˈθɹɛ.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Three
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/three//θɹiː/ –

Thrill
 – For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, the “i” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/thrihl/ – /θɹɪl/ –

Thrilling
 – For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, the “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THRIH-ling/ – /ˈθɹɪ.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that  the stress is on the first syllable –

Thrive
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/thrai-v//θɹaiː.v/ – Notice also that the “v” ending acts as a second syllable

Throat
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/throh[t]//θɹo[t]/

Through
 – For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, and the “ough” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

– /throo/ – /θɹu/ –

Throughout
 – For this word, the “Th” is un-voiced, the “ough” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “h” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the second “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/throo-WOW[T]//θɹu.ˈwɑu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Throw
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/throh//θɹo/

Thumb
 – For this word, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “u” is short, and the final “b” is silent (just pretend that the “b” is not even there)

/thuhm//θʌm/

Thunder
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “u” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THUHN-d’r//ˈθʌn.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Thursday
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “u” disappears, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-day” suffix – the final “ay” combination is pronounced simply like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TH’R-z-day//ˈθɚ.z.deiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” acts as a separate syllable

Thus
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is voiced, and the “u” is short

/thuhs//ðʌs/

Thwart
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, the the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/thwohr-[t]//θwoɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Thwarting
 – For this word, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/THWOHR-ding//ˈθwoɹ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that  the stress is on the first syllable –

Ti

Ticket
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/TIH-kih[t]//ˈtɪ.kə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tidal
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /TIGH-dəl//ˈtʌiː.ɾəl/ – Notice also that  the stress is on the first syllable –

Tide
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “e” is silent

– /tai[d]//taiː[ɾ]/

Tidy
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TAI-dee//ˈtaiː.ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tie
 – For this word, the “ie” combination is pronounced like the single long letter “i” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/tai//taiː/

Tied
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “i”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “i” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/tai-[d]//taiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending acts as a second syllable

Tiger
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “g” is hard, and the “e” disappears

/TIGH-g’r//ˈtʌiː.gɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Tight
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/tigh[t]//tʌiː[t]/

Tightly
 – For this word, the “igh” combination is pronounced like in the word “right” or “fight” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TIGH[T]-lee//ˈtʌiː[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tiling
 – For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” / phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /TAI-yə.ling//ˈtaiː.jə.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Timber
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “e” disappears

/TIHM-b’r//ˈtɪm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Timbre
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “e” is silent

/TIHM-br//ˈtɪm.bɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Time
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/taim//taiːm/

Timer
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the “e” disappears

/TAI-m’r//ˈtaiː.mɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Timing
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TAI-ming//ˈtaiː.mɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Time-Scale
 – For this hyphenated compound-word, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

– /TAIM-skayl//ˈtaiːm.skeɪl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Time-Table
 – For this term, the “i” is long, the first “e” is silent, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Dihpthong, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/TAIM-tay-bəl//ˈtaiːm.teiː.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Timid
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

– /TIH-mih[d]//ˈtɪ.mɪ[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Tin
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/tihn//tɪn/

Tinsel
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/TIHN-səl//ˈtɪn.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tiny
 – For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TAI-nee//ˈtaiː.niː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tip
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/tih[p]//tɪ[p]/

Tips
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/tih-ps//tɪ.ps/ – Notice also that the “ps” ending acts as a second syllable –

Tire
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/TIGH-y’r//ˈtʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Tired
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/TIGH-y’r-[d]//ˈtʌiː.jɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Tiring
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TIGH-y’r-ing//ˈtʌiː.jɚ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Titan
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /TIGH-[t]ihn//ˈtʌiː.[t]ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Titans
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “t” is (usually) stopped, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /TIGH-[t]ihn-z//ˈtʌiː.[t]ə(ɪ)n.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Title
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “t” is a flap-t, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent

– /TIGH-dəl//ˈtʌiː.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Titles
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the second “t” is a flap-t, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /TIGH-dəl-z//ˈtʌiː.ɾəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

To

To
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/too//tu/

Tobacco
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a short-u-schwa, the “a” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, and the final “o” is long

/tuh--koh/ – /tə(ʌ).ˈbæ.ko/ – Notice also that  the stress is on the second syllable –

Tobacconist
– For this word, the first “o” turns into a short-u-schwa, the “a” is short, the “cc” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “c”, the  second “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ist” suffix – and the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/tuh--kə-nih-s[t]//tə(ʌ).ˈbæ.kə.ə(ɪ).s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a fifth syllable

Today
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and for the “-day” suffix – the “d” is a flap-d, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

/too-DAY//tu.ˈɾeiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Toe
 – For this word, the “oe” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

– /toh//to/

Together
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “g” is hard, the first “e” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/tə-GEH-th’r//tə.ˈgɛ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Toilet
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “e” is pronounced like an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/TOY-lih[t]//ˈtoiː.lə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tolerance
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ance” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TAH-l’r-ihns/ – /ˈtɑ.lɚ.ə(ɪ)ns/ – Notice also that  the stress is on the first syllable

Tolerant
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TAH-l’r-ihn-[t]//ˈtɑ.lɚ.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

Tolerate
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the first “e” disappears, and for the “-ate” suffix” – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TAH-l’r-ay[t]//ˈtɑ.lɚ.e[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Told
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is often stopped

/tohl-[d]//tol.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Toll
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/tohl/ – /tol/ –

Tolls
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “z” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/tohl-z/ – /tol.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

Tomato
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the final “o” is long

/tə-MAY-doh//tə.ˈmeiː.ɾo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Tomatoes
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the second “t” is a flap-t, the final “oe” combination is pronounced simply like the single long “o”, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter ‘z”

/tə-MAY-dohz//tə.ˈmeiː.ɾoz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Tomb
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “b” is silent

– /toom//tum/

Tombs
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the “b” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /toom-z//tum.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

Tomorrow
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/tə-MAW-roh//tə.ˈmɔ.ɹo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Ton
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”

/tuhn//tʌn/

Tone
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/tohn//ton/

Tongue
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “sung” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ue” combination is silent

/tung//tʌŋ/

Tonne
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/tuhn//tʌn/

Too
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/too//tu/

Took
– For this word, the “oo” combination turns into a true-schwa / short “I” combination as in the words “book” and “looks”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/təɪ[k]//təɪ[k]/ – Notice also that the “k” ending (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable

Tool
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/tool//tul/

Toolbar
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/TOOL-bahr//ˈtul.bɑɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tooth
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/too-th//tu.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Top
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/tah[p]//tɑ[p]/

Topic
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (often) stopped

/TAH-pih[k]//ˈtɑ.pə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tops
 – For this word, the “o” is short

/tah-ps//tɑ.ps/ – Notice also that the “ps” ending acts as a separate syllable

Tornado
 – For this word, the first “o” is long, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “o” is long

/tohr-NAY-doh//toɹ.ˈnaiː.ɾo/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Toronto
 – For this word, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, the second “o” is short, and the last “o” is long

/tə-RAHN-toh//tə.ˈɹɑn.to/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Total
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TOH-dəl//ˈto.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Totally
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the second “t” is a flap-t, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final letter “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TOH-də-lee/ – /ˈto.ɾə.liː/ – Notice also that  the stress is on the first syllable –

Touch
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”

/tuh-ch//tʌ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

Touched
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”, and since the root-word ends with the “ch” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/TUH-ch-[t]//ˈtʌ.tʃ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “ch” combination and the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables

Touching
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TUH-ching/ – /ˈtʌ.tʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Tough
 – For this word, the “ou” is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”, and the “gh” is pronounced like the letter “f”

– /tuhf/ – /tʌf/ –

Tour
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, and there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next)

/TOO-w’r//ˈtu.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tourist
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ist” suffix – and the “i” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TOO-w’r-ihs-[t]/ – /ˈtu.wɚ.ə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Tourists
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ist” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TOO-w’r-ihs-ts/ – /ˈtu.wɚ.ə(ɪ)s.t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Tourism
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “ism” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “s” and the “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /TOO-w’r-ihzm/ – /ˈtu.wɚ.ə(ɪ)zm/ – Notice also that  the stress is on the first syllable

Tournament
– For this word, the “ou” combination disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/T’R-nuh-mihn-[t]//ˈtɚ.nə(ʌ).mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable –

Tours
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/TOO-w’rz//ˈtu.wɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Toward
 – for this word, the “w” is almost stopped, the “o” disappears, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, the “d” is (often) stopped

/t-WOHR-[d]//t-ˈwoɹ.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” and the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Towards
 – for this word, the “w” is almost stopped, the “o” disappears, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/t-WOHR-[d]z//t-ˈwoɹ.[d]z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” and “dz” ending (even when the “d” is stopped) act as separate syllables –

Towed
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”), and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “o” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/toh-[d]//to.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Tower
 – For this word, the “o” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TAH-w’r//ˈtɑ.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Town
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now”

/town//tɑun/

Toy
 – For this word, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “boy” or “joy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/toy//toiː/

Tr

Trace
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/chrays//tʃɹeiːs/

Track
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chræ[k]//ˈtʃɹæ[k]/

Tracked
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/chræk-t//tʃɹæk.t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Trade
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the final “e” is silent

/chray[d]//ˈtʃɹe[ɾ]/

Traded
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)the “a” a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/ch-RAY-dih[d]/ – /ˈtʃɹeiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Trader
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRAY-d’r//ˈtʃɹeiː.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Trading
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “d” is a flap-d, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRAY-ding//ˈtʃɹe.ɾɪŋ/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tradition
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chruh-DIH-shihn//ˈtʃɹʌ.dɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/– Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Traditional
 –For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chruh-DIH-shih-nəl//ˈtʃɹʌ.dɪ.ʃə(ɪ).nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Traffic
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it),” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is short, the “ff” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ic” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “c” is hard but is (sometimes) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRæ-fih[k]//ˈtʃɹæ.fə(ɪ)[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Train
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chrayn//ˈtʃɹeiːn/

Trainer
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRAY-n’r//ˈtʃɹeiː.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Trainers
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/CHRAY-n’r-z//ˈtʃɹeiː.nɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Training
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRAY-ning/ – /ˈtʃɹeiː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that  the stress is on the first syllable

Trait
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/chray[t]/ – /tʃɹeiː[t]/ –

Traits
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chray-ts/ – /tʃɹeiː.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable –

Tram
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “a” is short

/chræm//tʃɹæm/

Tranquil
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the “qu” combination directly after it), the “qu” combination is pronounced like the “kw” combination, and “i” turns into an true-schwa

/CHRæNG-kwəl//ˈtʃɹæŋ.kwəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Transcript
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “p” is (usually) stopped

/CHRæN-skrih[p]-t//ˈtʃɹæn.skɹə(ɪ)[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Transfer
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRæN-s-f’r//ˈtʃɹæn.s.fɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Transform
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, and the “o” is long

/CHRæN-s-fohrm//ˈtʃɹæn.s.foɹm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” acts as a separate syllable –

Transgress
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the first “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “g” is hard, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combinatio is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chræn-z-GREHS/ – /tʃɹæn.z.ˈgɹɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Transgression
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the first “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “g” is hard, the “e” is short, the “ss” combination combines with the “-sion” suffix, and for the “-sion” suffix (with the addition of the extra letter “s”) – the “ssi” combination is pronounced like the voiced version of the “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chræn-z-GREH-shihn/ – /tʃɹæn.z.ˈgɹɛ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Transition
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chræn-ZIH-shihn//tʃɹæn.ˈzɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Translate
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRæN-z-lay[t]//ˈtʃɹæn.z.le[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Translation
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chræn-z-LAY-shihn//tʃɹæn.z.ˈle.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Translator
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRæN-z-lay-d’r//tʃɹæn.z.leiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Transmit
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/chræn-z-MIH[T]//tʃɹæn.z.ˈmɪ[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Transparent
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is
(often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chræn-z-PAYR-ihn-[t]//tʃɹæn.z.ˈpeɪɹ.ə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” and the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Transport
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “o” is long, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/CHRæN-z-pohr-[t]//ˈtʃɹæn.z.poɹ.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” and the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Transportation
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “a” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “o” disappears, the second “a” is is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chræn-z-p’r-TAY-shihn//tʃɹæn.z.pɚ.ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Trap
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/chræ[p]//ˈtʃɹæ[p]/

Trapped
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” but is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “p” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/chræ[p]-t//tʃɹæ[p].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Trash
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

– /chræ-sh//ˈtʃɹæ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Trashy
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /CHRæ-shee//ˈtʃɹæ.ʃiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Travel
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “Ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/CHRæ-vəl//ˈtʃɹæ.vəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Travelled
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “Ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/CHRæ-vəl-[d]//ˈtʃɹæ.vəl.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) act as a third syllable –

Traveller
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRæ-və-l’r//ˈtʃɹæ.və.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Travelling
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /CHRæ-və-ling/ – /ˈtʃɹæ.və.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Travels
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “Ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “a” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/CHRæ-vəl-z//ˈtʃɹæ.vəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Traverse
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the first “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/chruh-V’R-s//tʃɹə(ʌ).ˈvɚ.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a third syllable –

Treacherous
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the second “e” disappears, and for the “ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /CHREH-ch’r-ihs//ˈtʃɹɛ.tʃɚ.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Treasure
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

– /CHREH-zh’r//ˈtʃɹɛ.ʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Treasurer
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “u” disappears, there is a phantom letter “r” in-between the first “r” and the letter “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /CHREH-zh’r-r’r//ˈtʃɹɛ.ʒɚ.ɹɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Treat
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the second “t” is (usually) stopped

/chree[t]//tʃɹiː[t]/

Treating
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHREE-ding//ˈtʃɹiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Treatment
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the second “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHREE[T]-mihn-[t]//ˈtʃɹeiː[t].mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and the final “t” (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Tree
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chree//ˈtʃɹiː/

Trembling
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is short, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHREHM-bling//ˈtʃɹɛm.blɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tremendous
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chrə-MEHN-dihs//tʃɹə.ˈmɛn.də(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Tremendously
– For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, the second “e” is short, for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/chrə-MEHN-dihs-lee//tʃɹə.ˈmɛn.də(ɪ)s.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Trend
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “e” is short, and the final “d” if (often) stopped

/chrehn-[d]//tʃɹɛn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Trial
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/CHRAI-əl//tʃɹaiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Triangle
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “g” directly after it), the “g” is hard (pronounced separately from the “ng” sound of the letter “n”), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “g” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/TRAI-yæng-gəl//ˈtʃɹaiː.jæŋ.gəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tribal
 – For this word, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

– /CHRAI-bəl//ˈtʃɹaiː.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Trick
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chrih[k]//ˈtʃɹɪ[k]/

Tricky
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/CHRIH-kee//ˈtʃɹɪ.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Trigger
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single hard letter “g” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRIH-g’r//ˈtʃɹɪ.gɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Trillion
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the second “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/CHRIH-lee-yihn//ˈtʃɹɪ.liː.jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Trip
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/chrih[p]//ˈtʃɹɪ[p]/

Triple
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/CHRIH-pəl/ – /ˈtʃɹɪ.pəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Tripled
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is short, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “p” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/CHRIH-pəl-[d]/ – /ˈtʃɹɪ.pəl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Triskaidekaphobia
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “Ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the first “i” is short, the “ai” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “i”, the “e” is short, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the third “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there ia a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the letter “i” and the final “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/chrihs-kai-deh-kuh-FOH-bee-uh/ – /ˌtʃɹə(ɪ)s.kaiː.ˌdɛ.kə(ʌ).ˈfo.biː.ə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that there are minor stresses on the first and third syllable and that the major stress is on the fifth syllable –

Triumph
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is long, the “u” is a u-schwa, and the “ph” combination is pronounced like a “pf” combination but the “p” is almost stopped

/CHRAI-uhm-[p]f//ˈtʃɹaiː.ə(ʌ)m[p]f/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Triumphs
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “i” is long, the “u” is a u-schwa, and the “ph” combination is pronounced like a “pf” combination but the “p” is (almost) stopped

/CHRAI-uhm-[p]f//ˈtʃɹaiː.ə(ʌ)m.[p]f/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Trophy
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “o” is long, the “ph” combination is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /CHROH-fee//ˈtʃɹo.fiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Tropical
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “o” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/CHRAH-pih-kəl//ˈtʃɹɑ.pə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Trouble
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “u”, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/CHRUH-bəl//ˈtʃɹʌ.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Troupe
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/chroo[p]//tʃɹu[p]/ – Notice also that the “p” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Trousers
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the first “s” is pronounced like the almost letter “z”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/CHROW-z’r-z//ˈtʃɹau.zɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable –

Truck
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “u” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chruh[k]//ˈtʃɹʌ[k]/

Trucks
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “u” is short, and the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” – However, at the end of the word is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/chruh-ks//ˈtʃɹʌ.ks/ – Notice also that the “ks” combination acts as a separate syllable

True
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”

/chroo//ˈtʃɹu/

Truly
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “u” is long, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/CHROO-lee//ˈtʃɹu.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Trunk
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “u” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “k” directly after it)

/chruhng-k//tʃɹʌŋ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable

Trust
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “u” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /chruhs-[t]//tʃɹʌs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Trustworthiness
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “u” is short, the second “t” is (often) stopped, the “o” disappears, the “th” combination is voiced, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /CHRUHS-[t]-w’r-thee-nihs//ˈtʃɹʌs.[t].wɚ.ðiː.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Trustworthy
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “u” is short, the second “t” is (often) stopped, the “o” disappears, the “th” combination is voiced, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /CHRUHS-[t]-w’r-thee//ˈtʃɹʌs.[t].wɚ.ðiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Truth
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), the “u” is long, and the final “th” combination is un-voiced

/chroo-th//ˈtʃɹu.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Try
 – For this word, the “T” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly behind it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

– /chrai//tʃɹaiː/

Ts

Tsunami
 – For this word, the “T” is silent, the “u” is long, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the final “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/soo-NAH-mee/ – /su.ˈnɑ.miː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Tu

Tub
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the final “b” is (usually) stopped

– /tuhb//tʌb/

Tube
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “b” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /toob//tub/

Tubs
 – For this word, the “u” is short, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /tuhb-z/ – /tʌb.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable –

Tuesday
 – For this word, the “ue” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-day” suffix – the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TOOZ-day//ˈtuz.deiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllabe

Tuition
 – For this word, the “u” is long, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “u” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the first “i” is short, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/too-WIH-shihn//tu.ˈwɪ.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Tune
 – For this word, the “u” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/toon//tun/

Tunisia
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/too-NEE-zhuh//tu.ˈniː.ʒə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Tunisian
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

/too-NEE-zhihn//tu.ˈniː.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Tunnel
 – For this word, the “u” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” turns into a true-schwa

/TUH-nəl/ – /ˈtʌ.nəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Turn
 – For this word, the “u” disappears

/t’rn//tɚn/

Tutor
 – For this word, the “u” is long, the second “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TOO-d’r//ˈtu.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

TV
 – For this acronym, each letter is pronounced simply like the individual letters

/tee-vee//tiː.viː/ – Notice also that there is no discernible stress –

Tw

Twang
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sang” or “rang” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/twang//twæŋ/

Twelve
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and the final “e” is silent

– /twehl-v/ – /twɛl.v/ – Notice also that the “v” ending acts as a second syllable

Twenty
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the second “t” is (usually) stopped (and is often completely silent), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /TWEHN-[t]ee//ˈtwɛn.[t]iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Twenty-Eight
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the first “e” is short, the second “t” is (usually) stopped (and is often completely silent), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “Ei” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “gh” combination is silent, and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

– /tweh-[t]nee-AY[T]//twɛ.n[t]iː.ˈeiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Twenty-Five
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the first “e” is short, the second “t” is (usually) stopped (and is often completely silent), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /tweh-[t]nee-FAIV//twɛ.n[t]iː.ˈfaiːv/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Twenty-Four
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the first “e” is short, the second “t” is (usually) stopped (and is often completely silent), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

– /tweh-[t]nee-FOHR//twɛ.n[t]iː.ˈfoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Twenty-Nine
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the first “e” is short, the second “t” is (usually) stopped (and is often completely silent), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent

– /tweh-[t]nee-NAIN//twɛ.n[t]iː.ˈnaiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Twenty-One
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the first “e” is short, the second “t” is (usually) stopped (and is often completely silent), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the “y” and the “O” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “O” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “e” is silent

– /tweh-[t]nee-WUHN//twɛ.n[t]iː.ˈwʌn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Twenty-Seven
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the first “e” is short, the second “t” is (usually) stopped (and is often completely silent), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “e” is short, and the third “e” turns into an i-schwa

– /tweh-[t]nee-SEH-vihn//twɛ.n[t]iː.ˈsɛ.və(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Twenty-Six
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the first “e” is short, the second “t” is (usually) stopped (and is often completely silent), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “i” is short, and the final “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination

– /tweh-[t]nee-SI-ks//twɛ.n[t]iː.ˈsɪ.ks/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “ks” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Twenty-Three
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the first “e” is short, the second “t” is (usually) stopped (and is often completely silent), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “Th” combination is un-voiced, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

– /tweh-[t]nee-THREE//twɛ.n[t]iː.ˈθɹiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Twenty-Two
 – This word is pronounced as two separate words – the first “e” is short, the second “t” is (usually) stopped (and is often completely silent), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “wo” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”

– /tweh-[t]nee-TOO//twɛ.n[t]iː.ˈtu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Twice
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/twighs//twʌiːs/

Twin
 – For this word, the “i” is short

/twihn//twɪn/

Twist
 – For this word, and for the “-ist” combination – and the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/twihs-[t]//twɪs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable

Twisted
 – For this word, the “-ist” combination – and the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/TWISH-tih[d]//ˈtwɪs.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Twitching
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TWIH-ching/ – /ˈtwɪ.tʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Twitter
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TWIH-d’r//ˈtwɪ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Two
 – For this word, the “w” is silent, and the final “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/too//tu/

Ty

Type
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “p” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/tigh[p]//tʌiː[p]/

Types
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/tigh-ps//tʌiː.ps/ – Notice also that the “ps” ending acts as a second syllable –

Typhus
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “ph” is pronounced like the letter “f” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

/TIGH-fihs//ˈtʌiː.fə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Typical
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and for the “-al” suffix – the “a” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TIH-pih-kəl//ˈtɪ.pə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Typically
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/TIH-pihk-lee/ – /ˈtɪ.pɪk.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Typing
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/TIGH-ping//ˈtʌiː.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Typos
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “o” is long, and the final “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”

/TIGH-pohz//ˈtʌiː.poz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tyre
 – For this word, the “y” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “r” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final letter “e”

/TIGH-y’r//ˈtʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Tyson
 – For this word, the “y” si pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/TIGH-sən//ˈtʌiː.sən/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter T ) –


Jump To…

Aa . Bb . Cc . Dd . Ee . Ff . Gg . Hh . Ii . Jj . Kk . Ll . Mm . Nn . Oo . Pp . Qq . Rr . Ss . Tt . Uu . Vv . Ww . Xx . Yy . Zz
Numbers

 


 

Explore GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!

Leave a Reply

Yo!