– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter U:  Una-Unm ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

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The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America. The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

Una-Unm

 

Ub . Uf . Ug . Uk . Ul . Um . Unn-Unz . Up . Ur . Us . Ut

Unable (un-able)
– For this word, the “U” is a u-schwa, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-AY-bəl//ə(ʌ)n.ˈeiː.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unacceptable (un-accept-able)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the first “c” is hard but is almost stopped, the second “c” is soft, the first “e” is short, the “p” is almost stopped, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-ehk-SEH[P]-tuh-bəl//ˌʌn.ɛk.ˈs[p].tə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Unaided (un-Aided)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the first “d” is a flap-d, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uhn-AY-dih[d]//ə(ʌ)n.ˈeiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unanimously (un-animous-ly)
– For this word, the “U” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “a” is short, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/yoo--nih-muhs-lee//ju.ˈnæ.nə(ɪ).mə(ɪ)s.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unapproachable (un-approach-able)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-uh-PROH-chuh-bəl//ʌn.ʌ.ˈpɹo.tʃə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Unattainable
– For this word, the “U” is short, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter ‘t”, the “ai” combination is pronounced simply like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-uh-TAYN-uh-bəl//ʌn.ə(ʌ).ˈteiːn.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Unavailable (un-avail-able)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-uh-VAYL-uh-bəl//ʌn.ə(ʌ).ˈveɪl.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Unavoidable (un-avoid-able)
– For this word, the “U” of the “Un” prefix is short, the first “a” is a u-schwa, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/un-uh-VOY-duh-bəl//ʌn.ə(ʌ).ˈvoiː.də(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Unaware (un-aware)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the first “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “e” is silent

/uhn-uh-WAYR//ʌn.ˈə(ʌ).weɪɹ / – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Unbearable (un-bear-able)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-BAYR-ə.bəl//ʌn.ˈbeɪɹ.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unbiased (un-biased)
– For this word, the “U” is a u-schwa, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “i” and the “a” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “s” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (often) stopped

/uhn-BAI-yihs-[t]//ə(ʌ)n.ˈbaiː.jə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fourth syllable

 

Uncertain (un-certain)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” disappears, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “ai” combination turns into an i-schwa

/uhn-S’R-[t]ihn//ʌn.sɚ.[t]ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Uncertainty (un-certain-ty)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “c” is soft, the “e” disappears, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “ai” combination turns into an i-schwa, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/uhn-S’R-[t]ihn-tee//ʌn.sɚ.[t]ə(ɪ)n.tiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Uncle
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “n” is pronounced like the “ng” combination (this is due to the placement of the hard letter “c” directly after it), the “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/UHNG-kəl//ˈʌŋ.kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Uncomfortable (un-comfort-able)
– for this word, the “U” is short, the “c” is hard, the first “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “o” disappears, the pronunciation of the letters “t” and “r” reverse places, for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-KUHM-f-t’r-bəl//ʌn.ˈkʌm.f.tɚ.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “f” acts as a separate syllable

 

Unconscious (un-conscious)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the first “c” is hard, the first “o” is short, the “sci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-KAHN-shihs//ʌn.ˈkɑn.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unconsummated (un-consummated)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” is short, the second “u” turns into a u-schwa, the “mm” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “m” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” joins with the “-ed” ending (this is the standard pronunciations of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue) and since the root-word ends with the sound letter “t” – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uhn-KAHN-suh-may-dih[d]//ʌn.ˈkɑn.sə(ʌ).meɪ.ɾə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Uncontrolled (un-controlled)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “c” is hard, the first “o” is a u-schwa, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the second “o” is long, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “l” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uhn-kuhn-CHROHL-[d]//ʌn.kə(ʌ)n.ˈtʃɹol.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Uncooperative (Un-Co-Operate-ive)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “C” is hard, the first “o” turns into a true-schwa, there is a phantom letter “w” in-between the two letters “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next),the second “o” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, and for the “-ive” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-kə-WAH-pruh-tihv//ʌn.kə.ˈwɑ.pɹə(ʌ).tə(ɪ)v/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Unctuous
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “n” is pronounced like an “ng” combination (this is due to the hard “c” directly after it), the “c” is hard but is almost stopped, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the second “u” is long, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/[K]-choo-ihs//ˈʌŋ[k].tʃu.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Under
– For this word, the “U” is short, and the “e” disappears

/UHN-d’r//ˈʌn.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Undergraduate
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “e” disappears, the “g” is hard, the first “a” is short, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-d’r-GRæ-dʒu-ih[t]//ʌn.dɚ.ˈgɹæ.dʒu.ə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Underground (under-ground)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “e” disappears, the “g” is hard, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uhn-d’r-GROWN-[d]//ʌn.dɚ.ˈgɹaun.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Undermining
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “e” disappears, the first “i” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation for this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-d’r-MAI-ning//ˈʌn.dɚ.maiː.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Underneath
– For this word, the “U” is short, the first “e” disappears, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/uhn-d’r-NEETH//ˌʌn.dɚ.ˈniːθ/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Underpinning (under-pin-ing)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “e” disappears, the first “i” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/UHN-d’r-pih-ning//ʌn.dɚ.pɪ.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Underscore (under-score)
– For this word, the “U” is short, and the “e” disappears, the “c” is hard, the “o” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/UHN-d’r-skohr//ˈʌn.dɚ.skoɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Underscoring (under-score-ing)
– For this word, the “U” is short, and the “e” disappears, the “c” is hard, the “o” is long, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/UHN-d’r-skohr-ing//ˈʌn.dɚ.skoɹ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Understand (under-stand)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uhn-d’r-STæN-[d]//ʌn.dɚ.ˈstæn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Understandable (under-stand-able)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the first “e” disappears, the first “a” is short, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-d’r-STæN-duh-bəl//ˌʌn.dɚ.ˈstæn.də(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Understanding (under-standing)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is short, and and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-d’r-STæN-ding//ʌn.dɚ.ˈstæn.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Undertaker
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/UHN-d’r-tay-k’r//ˈʌn.dɚ.teiː.kɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Undertaking
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is a TRUE Long “A”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/UHN-d’r-tay-king//ˈʌn.dɚ.te.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Underwater
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “e” disappears, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the second “e” disappears

/uhn-d’r-WAW-d’r//ʌn.dɚ.ˈwɔ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Undeveloped (un-developed)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is short, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, the “p” is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “p”, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/uhn-dee-VEH-luh[p]-t//ʌn.diː.ˈvɛ.lə(ʌ)[p].t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “t” ending acts as a fifth syllable

 

Undo (un-do)
– For this word, the “U” is short, and the final “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/uhn-DOO//ʌn.ˈdu/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unemployed (un-employed)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the first “e” is short, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “boy” or “toy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “y” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uhn-ehm-PLOY-[D]//ʌn.ɛm.ˈploiː.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a fourth syllable

 

Unemployment (un-employ-ment)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the first “e” is short, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word “boy” or “toy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ment” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-ehm-PLOY-mihn-[t]//ˌʌn.ɛm.ˈploiː.mə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Unethical (un-ethic-al)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “e” is short, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the “a” is a true-schwa

/uh-NEH-thih-kəl//ʌ.ˈnɛ.θə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Uneventful (un-event-ful)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the first “e” is long, the second “e” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-ee-VEHN-[t]-fəl//ˌʌn.iː.ˈvɛn-[t].fəl/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Unexpected (un-expected)
– For this word, The “U” is short, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “x” is pronounced like the “ks” combination, the second “e” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uhn-ihks-PEH[K]-tih[d]//ʌn.ə(ɪ)ks.ˈpɛk.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

 

Unfair (un-fair)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it)

/uhn-FAYR//ʌn.ˈfeɪɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unfathomable (un-fathom-able)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “a” is short, the “th” combination is voiced, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn--thəm-uh-bəl//ʌn.fæ.ðəm.ə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unforgettable (un-forget-able)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “o” disappears, the “g” is hard, the “e” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-t (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-f’r-GEH-duh-bəl//ˌʌn.fɚ.ˈgɛ.ɾə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that there is minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Unfortunate (un-fortune-ate)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “o” is long, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-FOHR-chən-ih[t]//ʌn.ˈfoɹ.tʃən.ə(ɪ)[t/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unfortunately (un-fortune-ate-ly)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “o” is long, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ate” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “e” is silent (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-FOHR-chən-ih[t]-lee//ʌn.ˈfoɹ.tʃən.ə(ɪ)[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unfriendly (un-friend-ly)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “d” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-FREHN-[d]-lee//ʌnˈfɹɛn.[d].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unhappy (un-happy)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “h” is pronounced, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/uhn--pee//ʌn.ˈhæ.piː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

UNICEF
– For this word, the “U” is pronounced like the pronoun “You”, the “I” is an i-schwa, the “C” is soft, and the “e” is short

/YOO-nih-sehf//ˈju.nə(ɪ).sɛf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Uniform (uni-form)
– For this word, the “U” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “o” is long

/YOO-nih-fohrm//ˈju.nə(ɪ).foɹm/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Unimportant (un-import-ant)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “U” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “o” is long, the first “t” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ant” suffix” – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-ihm-POHR-tihn-[t]//ˌʌn.ə(ɪ)m.ˈpoɹ.tə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable, that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Union
– For this word, the “U” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y”, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/YOON-yihn//ˈjun-jə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Unique
– For this word, the “U” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “qu” combination is pronounced like the letter “k” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “e” is silent

/yoo-NEEK//ju.ˈniːk/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unit
– For this word, the “U” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/YOO-nih[t]//ˈju.nə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

Units
– For this word, the “U” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the “i” is an i-schwa

/YOO-nih-ts//ˈju.nə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable

 

Unite
– For this word, the “U” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/yoo-NIGH[T]//ˈju.nʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

United
– For this word, the “U” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “t” – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is flap-d but is (often) stopped

/you-NIGH-dih[d]//ju.ˈnʌiː.ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Universe (uni-verse)
– For this word, the “U” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the “i” is an i-schwa, the first “e” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/YOO-nih-v’r-s//ˈju.nə(ɪ).vɚ.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a separate syllable

 

University (uni-verse-ity)
– For this word, the “U” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “e” disappears, and for the “-ity” suffix – the “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/yoo-nih-V’R-sih-dee//ju.nə(ɪ).vɚ.ˈsə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the third syllable

 

Unkind (un-kind)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “i” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/uhn-KAIN-[d]//ʌn.ˈkaiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unknowing (un-know-ing)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “k” is silent, the “o” is long, the “w” is pronounced as a consonant (not in combination with the letter “o”), the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-NOH-wing-lee//ʌn.ˈno.wɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unknowingly (un-know-ing-ly)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “k” is silent, the “o” is long, the “w” is pronounced as a consonant (not in combination with the letter “o”), the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-NOH-wing-lee//ʌn.ˈno.wɪŋ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unknown (un-known)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “k” is silent, the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the letter “o”)

/uhn-NOHN//ʌn.ˈnon/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unless
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “e” is short, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-LEHS//ʌn.ˈlɛs/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unlike
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “k” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/uhn-LIGH[K]//uhn.ˈlʌiː[k]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unlikely (un-likely)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “i” is pronounced like an “igh” combination, the “k” is almost stopped, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/uhn-LIGHK-lee//ʌn.ˈlʌɪk.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unlimited (un-limited)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the first “i” is short, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uhn-LIH-mih-dih[d]//ʌn.ˈlɪ.mə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unload (un-load)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/uhn-LOH[D]//ʌn.ˈlo[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

Unlucky (un-lucky)
– For this word, the “U” is short, the second “u” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k”, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/uhn-LUH-kee//uhn.ˈlʌ.kiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter U ) –


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