– American English Pronunciation–

– ( Letter V ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.

 


Vv

 

Ve . Vi . Vo

 

Vacancy
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the first “c” is hard, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, the second “c” is soft, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/VAY-kihn-see//ˈveiː.kə(ɪ)n.siː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Vacant
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is hard, the second “a” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/VAY-kihn-[t]/ – /ˈveiː.kə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Vacation
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “c” is hard, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /vay-KAY-shihn/ – /veiːˈkeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Vacuum
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, and the “uu” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/-kyoom//ˈvæ.kjum/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Vague
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is hard, the “ue” combination is silent

– /vayg/ – /veiːg/ –

Vaguely
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is hard, the “ue” combination is silent, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /VAYG-lee/ – /ˈveiːg.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Valentine’s
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “i” is long, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/-lihn-tain-z/ – /ˈvæ.lə(ɪ)n.taiːn.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Valid
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/-lih[d]/ – /ˈvæ.lə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Validate
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, and for the “-ate” suffix – the second “a” is a True Long “A”, the “t” is (ofte) stopped, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-lih-day[t]//ˈvæ.lə(ɪ).deiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Validates
 – For this word, the first “a” is short, the “i” is an i-schwa, the second “a” is a True Long “A”, and the “e” is silent

/-lih-day-ts//ˈvæ.lə(ɪ).deiː.ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a fourth syllable –

Valley
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ey” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/-lee/ – /ˈvæ.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Value
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

– /VæL-yoo//ˈvæl.ju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Valuable (Value-able)
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like a consonant letter “y”, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /VæL-yə-bəl//ˈvæl.jə.bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Valuables (Value-able-s)
– For this word, the “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like a consonant letter “y”, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /VæL-yə-bəl-z//ˈvæl.jə.bəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Van
 – For this word, the “a” is short

/væn/ – /væn/ –

Vanilla
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /və-NIH-luh//və.ˈnɪ.lə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Variation
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/vayr-ee-AY-shihn/ – /veɪɹ.iː.ˈeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Varied
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “i”  is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the long letter “e” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /VAYR-ee[d]//ˈveɪɹ.iː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Varies
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/VAYR-eez//ˈveɪɹ.iːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Varieties
 – For this word, the first “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the second “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the long letter “e”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z’

/vuh-RAI-ih-deez/ – /və(ʌ).ˈɹaiː.ə(ɪ).ɾiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Variety
 – For this word, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “i” is long, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/vuh-RAI-ih-dee//və(ʌ).ˈɹaiː.ə(ɪ).ɾiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Various
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “i” and the “o” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /VAYR-ee-yihs//ˈveɪɹ.iː.jə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Vary
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /VAYR-ee//ˈveɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Varying
 – For this word, the first “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “y” and the “i” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /VAYR-ee-ying//ˈveɪɹ.iː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Vascular
 – For this word, the “a” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ar” suffix – the “a” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/Væs-kyoo-l’r//ˈvæs.kju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Vast
 – For this word, the “a” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/væs-[t]/ – /væs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Vatican
– For this word, the first “a” is short, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” turns into a true-schwa, the “c” is hard, and the second “a” turns into an i-schwa

/Væ-də-kihn//ˈvæ.ɾə.kə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Ve

Veer
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”

/veer//viːɹ/ – Notice also that there is not discernible word-stress –

Veering
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/VEER-ing//ˈviːɹ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Vegetable
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /VEHdʒ-tuh-bəl//ˈvɛdʒ.tə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Vegetables
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is soft,the second “e” disappears, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the last “e” is silent, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /VEHdʒ-tuh-bəl-z//ˈvɛdʒ.tə(ʌ).bəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Vegetation
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “g” is soft, the second “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /veh-dʒih-TAY-shihn//vɛ.dʒə(ɪ).ˈteiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Veggies
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “gg” combination is pronounced simply like the single soft letter “g” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ie” combination is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /VEH-dʒeez/ – /ˈvɛ.dʒiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Vehicle
– For this word, the “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /VEE-yih-kəl//ˈviː.jə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Vehicles
 – For this word, the “e” is long, the “h” is pronounced like the consonant letter “y” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “c” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /VEE-yih-kl-z//ˈviː.jə(ɪ)kəl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Vehicular
 – For this word, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “h” is pronounced, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ar” suffix – the “a” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /vee-HIHK-you-l’r//viː.ˈhɪ.kju.lɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Vendor
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/VEHN-d’r//ˈvɛn.dəɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Veneer
 – For this word, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/və-NEER//və.ˈniːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Venture
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and for the “-ture” suffix – the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” disappears, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /VEHN-ch’r//ˈvɛn.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Venue
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and the “ue” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

/VEHN-yoo//ˈvɛn.ju/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Verb
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, and the final “b” is (sometimes) stopped

/v’r-[b]//vɚ.[b]/ – Notice also that the “b” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Vermont
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, the “o” is short, the the “t” is (usually) stopped

/v’r-MAHN-[t]//vɚ.ˈmɑn.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Versatile
 – For this word, there are two pronunciations.  In both: the “e” disappears, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa. In one version: the “t” is usually pronounced normally and the “i” is long.  In the other version:  the “t” is a flap-t, and the “i” disappears.   And in both versions, the final “e” is silent

– /V’R-sih-tai-l//ˈvɚ.sə(ɪ).taɪl/  – Or –  /V’R-sih-d’l/ – /ˈvɚ.sə(ɪ).ɾəl/ – Notice also that in both versions, the stress is on the first syllable –

Version
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /V’R-zhihn//ˈvɚ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Versus
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /V’R-sihz//ˈvɚ.sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Vertical
 – For this word, the “e” disappears, the “t” is a flap-t, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/V’R-dih-kəl/ – /ˈvɚ.ɾə(ɪ).kəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Very
 – For this word, the “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /VAYR-ee//ˈveɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Veteran
– For this word, there are two pronunciations:  In both versions: the first “e” is short.  In one version: “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the the fact that, since the “e” disappears, the “r” is the next sound).   In the other version: the “t” is a flap-t.  And in both versions:  the second “e” disappears. and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /VEH-chrihn//ˈvɛ.tʃɹə(ɪ)n/ –  OR  – For this word, – /VEH-d’r-ihn//ˈvɛ.ɾɚ.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also  that, in both versions the stress is on the first syllable –

Veterinarian
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “t” sounds like the “ch” combination (this is due to the the fact that, since the “e” disappears, the “r” is the next sound), the second “e” disappears, the “i” turns into an i-schwa, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “-ian” suffix – the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /veh-chrih-NAYR-ee-ihn//vɛ.tʃɹə(ɪ).ˈeɪɹ.iː.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Vexed
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “ks”, and since the root-word ends with the “ks” sound – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent , and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /VEHK-st/ – /ˈvɛk.st/ – Notice also that the “st” ending acts as a second syllable

Vi

Vicious
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ci” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/VIH-shihs//ˈvɪ.ʃə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Victim
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, and the second “i” is an i-schwa

/VIH[K]-dihm/ – /ˈvɪ[k].də(ɪ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Victory
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “c” is hard but is (often) stopped, the “o” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/VIH[K]-t’r-ee/ – /ˈvɪ[k].tɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Video
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d, the “e” is long, and the final “o” is long

/VIH-dee-oh//ˈvɪ.ɾiː.o/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Viet Nam
 – For this name, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”

/veeih[t]-NAHM//viː.ə(ɪ)[t].ˈnɑm/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the third syllable –

Vietnamese
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (often) stopped, the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the second “e” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/vee-ih[t]-nuh-MEEZ//ˌviː.ə(ɪ)[t].nə(ʌ).ˈmiːz/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable

View
 – For this word, the “iew” combination is pronounced like the pronoun “you”

– /vyou//vju/

Village
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /VIH-lih-dʒ//ˈvɪ.lə(ɪ).dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the soft “g” ending acts as a third syllable

Villain
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “ai” combination turns into an i-schwa

– /VIH-lihn//ˈvɪ.lə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Vineyard
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “e” is silent, the “y” takes the consonant form, the “a” disappears, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/VIHN-y’r[d]//ˈvɪn.yɚ[ɾ]/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Violation
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and for the “tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/vai-ə-LAY-shihn/ – /vaiː.ə.ˈleiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Violence
 – For this word, the “io” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

/VAI-ə-lihn-s/ – /ˈvaiː.ə.lə(ɪ)n.s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “s” ending acts as a fourth syllable

Violent
 – For this word, the “io” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i”, and for the “-ent” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/VAI-lihn-[t]/ – /ˈvaiː.lə(ɪ)n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Violently
 – For this word, the “io” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “i”, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/VAI-lihn-[t]-lee//ˈvaiː.lə(ɪ)n.[t].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” (when not stopped) acts as a separate syllable –

Violin
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the second “i” is short

– /vai-ə-LIHN//vaiː.ə.ˈlɪn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable –

Virtual
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/V’R-choo-əl//ˈvɚ.t ʃu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Virtually
 – For this word, the “i” disappears, the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “ua” combination is turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/V’R-chə-lee/ – /ˈvɚ.tʃə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Virtuous
 – For this word, the “i” disappearsthe “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “u” directly after it), the “u” is long, and for the “-ous” suffix – the “ou” combination turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/V’R-choo-ihs//ˈvɚ.tʃu.ə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Virus
 – this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the “u” turns into an i-schwa

– /VIGH-rihs//ˈvʌiː.ɹə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Visa
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

/VEE-suh//ˈviː.sə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Visible
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-ible” suffix – the “i” turns into an i-schwa, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/VIH-zih-bəl//ˈvɪ.zə(ɪ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Vision
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, and for the “-sion” suffix – the “si” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/VIH-zhihn//ˈvɪ.ʒə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Visit
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /VIH-zih[t]//ˈvɪ.zə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Visited
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /VIH-zih-dih[d]/ – /ˈvɪ.zə(ɪ).ɾə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Visiting
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /VIH-zih-ding//ˈvɪ.zə(ɪ).ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Visitor
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the second “i” is an i-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-or” suffix – the “o” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /VIH-zih-d’r//ˈvɪ.zə(ɪ).ɾəɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Visits
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the second “i” is an i-schwa

– /VIH-zih-ts//ˈvɪ.zə(ɪ).ts/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ts” ending acts as a third syllable –

Visual
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “u” is long, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/VIH-zhu-əl/ – /ˈvɪ.ʒu.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Visualization
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “su” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the second “i” is long, the second “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and for the “-tion” suffix – the “ti” combination is pronounced like the un-voiced “sh” combination, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/vih-zhəl-ai-ZAY-shihn/ – /ˌvɪ.ʒəl.aiː.ˈzeiː.ʃə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that there is a minor stress on the first syllable and that the major stress is on the fourth syllable –

Visualize
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “su” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/VIH-zhə-laiz/ – /ˈvɪ.ʒə.laiːz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Visualized
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “su” is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, for the “-ize” suffix – the “i” is long, and the “e” combines with the “-ed” ending, and since the root-word ends with the sound of the letter “z” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix combination in The Common Tongue)

/VIH-zhə-laiz-[d]/ – /ˈvɪ.ʒə.laiːz.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a fifth syllable

Visually
 – For this word, the first “i” is short, the “su” combination is pronounced like the voiced “sh” combination, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/VIH-zhə-lee/ – /ˈvɪ.ʒə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Vital
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “a” turns into a true-schwa

/VIGH-dəl//ˈvʌiː.ɾəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Vitamin
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, and the “i” turns into an i-schwa

/VIGH-də-mihn/ – /ˈvʌiː.ɾə.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Vo

Vocabulary
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “c” is hard, the “a” is short, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /voh-KæB-you-layr-ee//vo.kæ.bju.leɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable –

Vodka
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “d” is (usually) stopped, and the final “a” turns into a u-schwa

– /VAH[D]-kuh//ˈvɑ[d].kə(ʌ)/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Voice
 – For this word, the “oi” combination is pronounced like the “oy” combination, the “c” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /voys//voiːs/

VOIP
 – For this acronym, since it can be pronounced as a “word”, the “OI” combination is pronounced like a “oy” combination, and the final “p” is (sometimes) stopped

– /voyp/ – /voiːp/ –

Volatile
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “a” turns into a true-schwa, the “i” is long, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

/VAH-lə-tai-əl//ˈvɑ.lə.taiː.əl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Volcano
 – For this word, the first “o” is short, the “c” is hard, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “o” is long

/vahl-KAY-noh//vɑl.ˈkeiː.no/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Volkswagen
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “a” is short, the “g” is hard, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

– /VOHL-ks-wæ-gihn//ˈvol.ks.wæ.gə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “ks” combination acts as a separate syllable –

Volume
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced ilke the “aw” combination, the “u” is pronounced like the pronoun “you”, and the final “e” is silent

/VAWL-yoom//ˈvɔl.jum/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Voluntary
– For this word, the “o” is short, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, and for the “-ary” suffix – the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/VAH-lihn-tayr-ee//ˈvɑ.lə(ɪ)n.teɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Volunteer
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/vah-lihn-TEER//vɑ.lə(ɪ)n.ˈtiːɹ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Volunteering
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “u” turns into an i-schwa, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/vah-lihn-TEER-ing//vɑ.lə(ɪ)n.ˈtiːɹ.ɪ ŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the third syllable

Vote
 – For this word, the “o” is long, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/voh[t]//vo[t]/

Votes
 – For this word, the “o” is long, and the “e” is silent

– /voh-ts/ – /vo.ts/ – Notice also that the “ts” ending acts as a second syllable

Voucher
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the “e” disappears

/VOW-ch’r/ – /ˈvau.tʃɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Vouchers
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, the “e” disappears, and the final s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/VOW-ch’r-z/ – /ˈvau.tʃɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Vowels
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “e” turns into a true-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/VAH-w’l-z//ˈvɑ.wl.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “z” ending acts as a third syllable

Voyage
 – For this word, the “oy” combination is pronounced like in the word, “Toy” or “Boy” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-age” suffix – the “a” turns into an i-schwa, the “g” is soft, and the “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/VOY-yihdʒ//ˈvoiː-ə(ɪ)dʒ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter V ) –



Jump To…

Aa . Bb . Cc . Dd . Ee . Ff . Gg . Hh . Ii . Jj . Kk . Ll . Mm . Nn . Oo . Pp . Qq . Rr . Ss . Tt . Uu . Vv . Ww . Xx . Yy . Zz
Numbers

 


 

Explore GiveMeSomeEnglish!!!

Leave a Reply