– American English Pronunciation –

– ( Letter W ) –


An alphabetical pronunciation guide of The Common Tongue – a.k.a. – American English Pronunciation, containing the phonetic spellings of a vast selection of common and not-so-common words in the English language, with more added daily.

The pronunciations are not Universal as there are many different dialects of the English language, both world-wide and throughout America.  The pronunciations that are presented here are based upon a combination of both common usage and the most neutral accent used in The International Common Tongue.


Ww

 

We . Wh . Wi . Wo . Wr

W
– For the name of this letter we say: “double-u” – the letter “d”, short letter “u”, the letter “b”, a true-schwa, the letter “l”, and then the letter “u” pronounced like the pronoun “you”

– /DUH-bəl-yoo//ˈdʌ.bəl.ju/ –

Wage
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and the final “e” is silent

– /way-dʒ/ – /weiː.dʒ/ – Notice also that the soft “g” acts as a second syllable

Wager
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “g” is soft, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WAY-dʒɚ/ – /weiː.dʒɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable –

Waist
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

/ways-[t]/ – /weiːs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Wait
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /way[t]/ – /weiː[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a second syllable –

Waiter
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /WAY-d’r/ – /ˈweiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Waiters
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is a flap-t, the “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/WAY-d’r-z/ – /ˈweiː.ɾɚ.z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Waitress
– For this word, the “ai” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “t” is pronounced like the “ch” combination (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and for the “ess” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /WAY-chrihs/ – /ˈweiː.tʃɹə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wake
 – For this word, the “a” is a True Long “A”, and the final “e” is silent

– /way-k/ – /weiː.k/ –

Wales
– For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/wayl-z//weɪl.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a separate syllable

Walk
 – For this word, the “al” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination

– /wawk//wɔk/

Walked
 – For this word, the “al” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “k” is (often) stopped, the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /waw[k]-t//wɔ[k].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a separate syllable

Walking
– For this word, the “al” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WAW-king/ – /ˈwɔ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Walkway
– For this word, the “al” combination is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “k” is almost stopped, and the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphtong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/WAWK-way//ˈwɔk.weiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wall
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the singe letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/wawl/ – /wɔl/ –

Wallet
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/WAW-lih[t]//ˈwɔ.lə(ɪ)[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wander
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “e” disappears

/WAWN-d’r/ – /ˈwɔn.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Want
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/wawn-[t]/ – /wɔn.[t]/ –

Wanted
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/WAHN-tih[d]/ – /ˈwɑn.tə(ɪ)[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

War
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”

/wohr/ – /woɹ/ –

Wardrobe
– For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “o” is long, the “b” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/WOHR-dʒroh[b]//ˈwoɹ.dʒɹo[b]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Warm
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”

/wohrm/ – /woɹm/ –

Warmth
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, and the “th” combination is un-voiced

/wohrm-th/ – /woɹm.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable –

Warn
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”

/wohrn/ – /woɹn/ –

Warning
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the long letter “o”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WOHR-ning/ – /ˈwoɹ.nɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wary
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/WAYR-ee/ – /ˈweɪɹ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Was
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /wuhz//wʌz/

Wash
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “sh” combination is un-voiced

/waw-sh/ – /wɔ.ʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” ending acts as a second syllable –

Washing
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WAW-shing/ – /ˈwɔ.ʃɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Waste
  – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the “e” is silent

– /way-s[t]//weiː.s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) acts as a second syllable

Wasted
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and since the root-word ends with the letter “t” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /WAYS-tih[d]//ˈweiːs.tə(ɪ)[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wasting
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /WAY-sding//ˈweiːs.dɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Watch
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/wah-ch/ – /wɑ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable –

Watched
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the “ch” sound – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t” but is (usually) stopped

– /wah-ch-[t]/ – /wɑ.tʃ.[t]/ – Notice also that the “ch” and the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Watches
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “o”, and the “tch” combination is pronounced simply like the “ch” combination (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-es” ending – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/WAH-chihz/ – /ˈwɑ.tʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable –

Water
 – For this word, the “a” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “e” disappears

/WAW-d’r/ – /ˈwɔ.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wave
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/wayv/ – /weiːv/ –

Waving
 – For this word, the “a” is a Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /WAY-ving//ˈweiː.vɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Way
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/way/ – /weiː/ –

Ways
 – For this word, the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/way-z/ – /weiː.z/ – Notice also that the “z” ending acts as a second syllable

We

We
– For this word, the “e” is long

/wee//wiː/

Weak
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/wee[k]/ – /wiː[k]/ –

Weakest
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is
(often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WEE-kihs-[t]/ – /ˈwiː.kə(ɪ)s.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable

Weakness
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “k” is (often) stopped, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WEE[K]-nihs//ˈwiː[k].nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Weaknesses
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “k” is (often) stopped, for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), the third “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/WEE[K]-nih-sihz//ˈwiː[k].nə(ɪ).sə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wealth
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “th” combination is un-voiced

/wehl-th//wɛl.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Wealthy
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, the “th” is unvoiced, and the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /WEHL-thee//ˈwɛl.θiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Weapon
 – For this word, the “ea”combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/WEH-pihn//ˈwɛ.pə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wear
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong

/wayr//weɪɹ/

Wearable
– For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and for the “-able” suffix – the “a” turns into a u-schwa, there is a
phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to
the next), and the final “e” is silent (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common
Tongue)

/way.ruh.bəl//weɪ.ɹə(ʌ).bəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllalbe

Wearing
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of  this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WAYR-ing/ – /ˈweɪɹ.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Weasel
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the second “e” turns into a true-schwa

/WEE-zəl//ˈwiː.zəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Weather
 – For this word, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the short letter “e”, the “th” is voiced, and the “e” disappears

– /WEH-th’r/ – /ˈwɛ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Web
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “b” is (often) stopped

/weh[b]//wɛ[b]/

Website
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, the “b” is (often) stopped, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/WEH[B]-sigh[t]//ˈwɛ[b].sʌiː[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wedding
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “dd” combination is pronounced simply like the single flap-d (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the words “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WEH-ding//ˈwɛ.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wednesday
 – This (along with the words “February” and “Nuclear”) is one of the most “mis-pronounced” (according to the spelling) words in the English language, however, this is the way it is now pronounced…  For this word, the first “e” is short, the “d” is silent, the second “e” disappears, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and for the “-day” suffix – the “ay” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /WEHN-Z-day//ˈwɛn-z.deiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Week
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “k” is (often) stopped

/wee[k]//wiː[k]/

Weekend
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/WEE-kehn-[d]//ˈwiː.kɛn[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the (when not stopped) the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Weekly
 – For this word, the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/WEEK-lee//ˈwiːk.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Weigh
 – For this word, the “eigh” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong

– /way/ – /weɪ/ –

Weighing
 – For this word, the “eigh” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, there is a phantom consonant “y” in-between the “eigh” combination and the “-ing” suffix (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/way-ying//ˈweɪ.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Weight
 – For this word, the “eigh” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /way[t]/ – /weiː[t]/ –

Weightlessness
 – For this word, the “eigh” combination is pronounced like the Long “A” / Long “E” Diphthong, the “t” is (often) stopped, for the “-less” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s”(this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WAY[T]-lihs-nihs//ˈweiː[t].lə(ɪ)s.nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Weird
 – For this word, the “ei” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is NOT the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/weer[d]/ – /wiːɹ[ɾ]/ –

Welcome
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schwa, and the final “e” is silent

/WEHL-cuhm//ˈwɛl-kə(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Welcoming
 – For this word, the “e” is short, the “c” is hard, the “o” turns into a u-schaw, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /WHEL-kuhm-ing//ˈwɛl.kə(ʌ)m.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Well
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /wehl/ – /wɛl/ –

Wellington
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ing” combination is pronounced just as the suffix, and the “o” turns into an i-schwa

/WEH-ling-tihn/ – /ˈwɛ.lɪŋ.tə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Welsh
– For this word, the “e” is short, and the “sh” ending is un-voiced

/WEHL-sh//ˈwɛl.ʃ/ – Notice also that the “sh” ending acts as a separate syllable

Welt
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/wehl-t//wɛl.t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Went
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is often stopped

/wehn.[t]/ – /wɛn-[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Were
 – For this word, the first “e” disappears, and the second “e” is silent

/w’r//wɚ/

West
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/wehs-[]t//wɛs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Western
 – For this word, the first “e” is short, and the second “e” disappears

/WEHS-t’r-n//ˈwɛs.tɚn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Wet
 – For this word, the “e” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/weh[t]//wɛ[t]/

Wh

What
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /wuh[t]/ – /wʌ[t]/ –

Whatever
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “a” turns into a u-schwa, the “t” is a flap-t, the first “e” is short, the second “e” disappears

/wuh-DEH-v’r//wə(ʌ).ˈɾɛvɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Wheat
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /wee[t]/ – /wiː[t]/ –

Wheel
– For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/weel//wiːl/

When
– For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), and the “e” is short

/wehn//wɛn/

Whenever
– For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” turns into an i-schwa, the second “e” is short, and the third “e” disappears

/wihn-EH-v’r//wə(ɪ)n.ˈɛ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Where
– For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, and the final “e” is silent

/wayr//weɪɹ/

Whereas
– For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the second “e” is silent, the “a” is short, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/wayr-az//weɪɹ.æz/ – Notice also that there is no discernible stress –

Wherever
– For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is pronounced like the Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong, the second “e” is short, and the third “e” disappears

/wayr-EH-v’r//weɪɹ.ˈɛ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Whether
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the first “e” is short, the “th” is voiced, and the second “e” disappears

– /WEH-th’r/ – /ˈwɛ.ðɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Which
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), and the “i” is short

/wih-ch/ – /wɪ.tʃ/ – Notice also that the “ch” ending acts as a second syllable

While
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” / phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the “e” is silent

– /WAI-yəl//ˈwaiː.jəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Whilst
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is long, there is a phantom-schwa between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “t” is (sometimes) stopped

– /WAI-əl-s[t]//ˈwaiː.əl.s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending acts as a third syllable –

Whirlpool
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue)the “i” disappears, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “r” and the “l”, and the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/W’R-əl-pool//ˈwɚ.əl.pul/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Whisper
– For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, and the “e” disappears

/WIHS-p’r//ˈwɪs.pɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Whistle
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “t” is silent, there is a phantom-schwa between the “t” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “e” is silent

– /WIH-səl//ˈwɪ.səl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Whistleblower
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “t” is silent, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “t” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “e” is silent, the “o” is long, and the “e” disappears

/WIH-səl-bloh-w’r/ – /ˈwɪ.səl.blo.wɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

White
– For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh”, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/wigh[t]//wʌiː[t]/

Whiteboard
– For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (usually) stopped, the “e” is silent, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/WIGH[T]-bohr-[d]//ˈwʌiː[t].boɹ.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Who
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “h” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “h” is pronounced, and the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/hoo/ – /hu/ –

Whoever
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “h” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “h” is pronounced, the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, there is a phantom “w” in-between the “o” and the “e” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the first “e” is short, and the second “e” disappears

/hoo-WEH-v’r//hu.ˈwɛ.vɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Whole
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “h” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “h” is pronounced, the “o” is long, and the “e” is silent

– /hohl/ – /hol/(This word is pronounced exactly like the noun “hole” [without the “w”])

Wholesale
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “h” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the first “e” is silent, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it) and the final “e” is silent

/HOHL-sayl-rz/ – /ˈhol.seɪl.ɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “rz” combination acts as a third syllable –

Wholesalers
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “h” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is long, the first “e” is silent, the “a” is a Long “A” / Short “I” Diphthong (this is due to the placement of the letter “l” directly after it), the second “e” disappears, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/HOHL-sayl-rz/ – /ˈhol.seɪl.ɚz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “rz” combination acts as a third syllable –

Whom
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “h” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), and the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”

/hoom//hum/

Whose
 – For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “h” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

– /hooz//huz/

Why
– For this word, the “Wh” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “W” (this is one of two standard pronunciations of this combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “i”

/wai//waiː/

Wi

Wide
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/wai[d]//waiː[ɾ]/

Widely
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WAI[D]-lee//ˈwaiː[ɾ].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Widen
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but it is (often) stopped, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /WAI-[d]ihn//ˈwaiː.[ɾ]ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wider
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /WAI-d’r//ˈwaiː.ɾɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Widespread
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the first “e” is silent, the “ea” combination is pronounced simply like the single short letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /WAI[D]-spreh[d]//ˈwaiː[ɾ].spɹɛ[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Width
– For this word, the “i” is short, the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, and the final “th” combination is un-voiced

/wi[d]-th//wɪ[ɾ].θ/ – Notice also that the “th” ending acts as a second syllable

Wife
 – For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

/wighf//wʌiːf/ –

WiFi
– For this word, the fist “i” is long, and the second “i” is long

/WAI-fai//ˈwaiː.faiː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wild
 – For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” / phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/WAI-yəl-[d]//ˈwaiː.jəl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wildest
 – For this word, the “i” is long, there is a phantom consonant letter “y” / phantom-schwa combination in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-est” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “t” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WAI-yəl-dih-s[t]/ – /ˈwaiː.jəl.ɾə(ɪ).s[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped)  acts as a fourth syllable

Wildlife
 – For this word, the first “i” is long, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped, the second “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, and the final “e” is silent

– /WAI-yəl[d]-lighf//ˈwaiː.jəl[ɾ].lʌiːf/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wildly
– For this word, the first “i” is long, there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “i” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WAI-yəl[d]-lee//waiː.jəl[ɾ].liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Will
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/wihl//wɪl/

Willing
– For this word,

/WIH-ling//ˈwɪ.lɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Win
– For this word,

/wihn//wɪn/

Wind (noun)
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /wihn-[d]//wɪn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Wind (verb)
– For this word, the “i” is long, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /wain-[d]//waiːn.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Window
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the “ow” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (the “w” does not affect the pronunciation of the “o”)

/WIHN-doh//ˈwɪn.do/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Windscreen
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “c” is hard, and the “ee” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/WIHN-[d]-skreen//ˈwɪn.[d].skɹiːn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Windshield
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “d” is (usually) stopped, the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is (often) stopped

/WIHN-[d]-sheel-[d]//ˈwɪn.[d].ʃiːl.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wine
– For this word, the “ai” is long, and the final “e” is silent

/wain//waiːn/

Winery
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “e” disappears, and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/WAI-n’r-ee/ – /ˈwaiː.nɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wing
– For this word,

/wing//wɪŋ/

Winner
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply as the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WIH-n’r//ˈwɪ.nɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Winning
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “nn” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “n” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /WIHN-ing//ˈwɪn.ɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Winter
– For this word, the “i” is short, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WIHN-t’r//ˈwɪn.tɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wire
– For this word, the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, there is a phantom consonant letter “y”, and the final letter “e” is silent

/WIGH-y’r//ˈwʌiː.jɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wisconsin
 – For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “c” is hard, the “o” is short, and the second “i” is an i-schwa

/wih-SKAHN-sihn/ – /wə(ɪ).ˈskɑn.sə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Wisdom
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “s” is pronounced like the letter “z”, and the “o” turns into a u-schwa

/WIHZ-duhm//ˈwɪz.də(ʌ)m/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wise
– For this word, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, and the final “e” is silent

/waiz//ˈwaiːz/

Wisely
 – For this word, the “i” is long, the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”, the “e” is silent, and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

– /WAIZ-lee//ˈwaiːz.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wish
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “sh” combination is un-voiced

/wih-sh//wɪ.ʃ/

Wished
 – For this word, the “i” is short, and since the root-word ends with the un-voiced “sh” combination – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/wih-sh-t//wɪ.ʃ.t/ – Notice also that the “sh” combination and the “t” ending act as separate syllables –

Wishes
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the final “s” is pronounced (almost) like the letter “z”

/WIH-shihz//wɪ.ʃə(ɪ)z/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

With
– For this word, the “i” is short, and the final “th” combination is un-voiced

/wih-th//wɪ.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” combination acts as a separate syllable

Withdraw
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “d” is pronounced like the soft “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), and the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “law” and “saw”

/wihth-dʒrAW//wə(ɪ)θ.ˈdʒɹɔ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Withdrawal
 – For this word, the “i” is short, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “d” is pronounced like the soft letter “g” (this is due to the placement of the letter “r” directly after it), the “aw” combination is pronounced like in the word “saw” or “draw” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the second “a” disappears

/wihth-dʒRAWL//wɪθˈdʒɹɔl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Within
– For this word, the first “i” is an i-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, and the second “i” is short

/wih-THIHN//wə(ɪ).ˈθɪn/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Without
– For this word, the “i” is an i-schwa, the “th” combination is un-voiced, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the “t” ending is (often) stopped

/wih-THOW[T]//wə(ɪ).ˈθɑu[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable

Witness
– For this word, the the “i” is short, the “t” is (usually) stopped, and for the “-ness” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss”
combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WIH[T]-nihs//ˈwɪ[t].nə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wo

Wobbly
 – For this word, the “o” is short, the “bb” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “b” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom-schwa in-between the “b” and the “l” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/WAH-bə-lee//ˈwɑ.bə.liː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wolf
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa

/wəl-f//wəl.f/ – Notice also that the “f” ending acts as a second syllable

Wolves
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, the “e” is silent, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/wəl-vz//wəl.vz/ – Notice also that the “vz” ending acts as a second syllable

Woman
 – For this word, the “o” turns into a true-schwa, and the “a” turns into an i-schwa

– /-mihn//ˈwə.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Women
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

– /WIH-mihn//ˈwɪ.mə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Women’s
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, the “e” is pronounced like the short letter “i”, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /WIH-mihnz//ˈwɪ.mə(ɪ)nz/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wonder
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WUHN-d’r//ˈwʌn.dɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wondered
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the first “e” disappears, and since the root-word ends with the letter “r” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/WUHN-d’r-[ɾ]/ – /ˈwʌn.dɚ.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending acts as a third syllable –

Wonderful
– For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the first “e” disappears, and for the “-ful” suffix – the “u” turns into a true-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WUHN-d’r-fəl//ˈwʌn.dɚ.fəl/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wonderfully
 – For this word, the “o” is pronounced like the short letter “u”, the “e” disappears, and for the “-fully” suffix – the “u” disappears, the “ll” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “l” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/WUHN-d’r-flee/ – /ˈwʌn.dɚ.fliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wood
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (usually) stopped

/wəih[d]//wəɪ[ɾ]/

Wooden
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong, and the final “d” is a flap-d, and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/wəih.də(ɪ)n//ˈwəɪɾ.ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Woods
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/wəih-dz/ – /wəɪ.dz/ – Notice also that the “dz ending acts as a second syllable

Wool
– For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong

/wəihl//wəɪl/

Woozy
 – For this word, the “oo” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/WOO-zee//ˈwu.ziː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable
(Learn the meaning of this word on the GiveMeSomeEnglish!!! – Slang Terms Page)

Word
– For this word, the “o” disappears, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/w’r-[d]//wɚ.[ɾ]/

Words
 – For this word, the “o” disappears, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /w’r-dz//wɚ.dz/ – Notice also that the “dz” ending acts as a second syllable –

Work
 – For this word, the “o” disappears

– /w’r-k//wɚ.k/ –

Worked
 – For this word, the “o” disappears, the “k” is (usually) stopped, and since the root-word ends with the letter “k” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

– /w’r-[k]-t/ – /wɚ.[k].t/ – Notice also that the “k” and the “t” ending act as separate syllables –

Worker
– For this word, the “o” disappears, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/W’R-k’r//ˈwɚ.kɚ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Working
 – For this word, the “o” disappears, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /W’R-king//ˈwɚ.kɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Workload
 – For this word, the “o” disappears, the “k” is almost stopped, the “oa” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “o” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/W’R-k-loh[d]/ – /ˈwɚ.k.lo[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and the “k” acts as a separate syllable

World
 – For this word, the “o” disappears, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /w’rl-[d]/ – /wɚl.[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable

Worlds
 – For this word, the “o” disappears, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

– /w’rl-[d]z//wɚl-[d]z/ – Notice also that the “dz” ending (even when the “d” is (stopped) acts as a second syllable –

World-Wide
 – For this word, the “o” disappears, the “d” is (often) stopped, the “i” is long, the second “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

– /w’rl-[d]-WAI[D]//wɚl-[d]-ˈwaiː[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the second syllable and that the first “d” acts as a separate syllable –

Worn
 – For this word, the “o” is long

/wohrn//woɹn/

Worried
– For this word, the “o” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” combines with the “-ed” ending, the “ie” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “e”, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/W’R-ee[d]//ˈwɚ.iː[ɾ]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Worry
– For this word, the “o” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”

/W’R-ee/ – /ˈwɚ.iː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Worrying
– For this word, the “o” disappears, the “rr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), there is a phantom consonant letter “y” in-between the “r” and the “y” (this is a product of the transition from one sound to the next), the “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e”, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the
standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/W’R-ee-ying//ˈwɚ.iː.jɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Worse
 – For this word, the “o” disappears, and the final “e” is silent

/w’rs/ – /wɚs/ –

Worsen
 – For this word, the “o” disappears, and the “e” turns into an i-schwa

/W’R-sihn//ˈwɚ.sə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Worsened
 – For this word, the “o” disappears, the first “e” turns into a true-schwa, and since the root-word ends with the letter “n” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

/W’R-sihn-[d]//ˈwɚ.sə(ɪ)n.[d]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Worship
– For this word, the “o” disappears, and for the “-ship” suffix – the “sh” combination is un-voiced, the “i” is an i-schwa, and the final “p” is (often) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/W’R-shih[p]//ˈwɚ.ʃə(ɪ)[p]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Worst
 – For this word, the “o” disappears, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

– /w’r-s[t]//wɚ.s[t]/ – Notice also that the “st” ending (even when the “t” is stopped) is pronounced as a second syllable –

Worth
 – For this worth, the “o” disappears, and the final “th” combination is un-voiced

– /w’r-th//wɚ.θ/ – Notice also that the “th” combination acts as a second syllable

Would
 – For this word, the “oul” combination is prounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /wəih[d]//wəɪ[d]/ – (This word sounds exactly like the word “wood”)

Wouldn’t
 – For this word, the “oul” combination is prounced as a true-schwa / Short “I” Diphthong (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the final “t” is (usually) stopped

– /wəih[d]-n-[t]//wəɪ[d].n.[t]/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “n” and the “t” ending (when not stopped) act as separate syllables –

Wound (noun and verb which describes an “injury”)
– For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, and the final “d” is (often) stopped

– /woon-[d]//wun.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Wound (verb)
– For this word the “ou” combination is pronounced like the “ow” combination, and the final “d” is (sometimes) stopped

– /wown-[d]//waun.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Wounded
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced simply like the single long letter “u”, and since the root-word ends with the letter “d” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending turns into an i-schwa, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

/WOON-dih-[d]//ˈwun-də(ɪ).[ɾ] / – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable and that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a third syllable –

Wounds
 – For this word, the “ou” combination is pronounced like the long letter “u”, the “d” is (often) stopped, and the final “s” is pronounced almost like the letter “z”

/woon-[d]z//wun.[d]z/ – Notice also that the “dz” ending (even when the “d” is stopped) acts as a second syllable

Wow
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced as in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

– /wow/ – /wɑw/ –

Wowed
 – For this word, the “ow” combination is pronounced like in the word “how” or “now” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and since the root-word ends with the letter “w” – the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is a flap-d but is (often) stopped

– /wow-[d]/ – /wau.[d]/ – Notice also that the “d” ending (when not stopped) acts as a second syllable –

Wr

Wrap
– For this word, the “Wr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”, the “a” is short, and the final “p” is (often) stopped

/ræ[p]//ɹæ[p]/

Wrapped
– For this word, the “Wr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “p” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) (but in this word is usually stopped), the “e” of the “-ed” ending is silent, and the final “d” is pronounced like the letter “t”

/ræ[p]-t//ɹæ[p].t/ – Notice also that the “t” ending acts as a separate syllable –

Wrapping
– For this word, the “Wr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r”, the “a” is short, the “pp” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/-ping//ˈɹæ.pɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wreck
 – For this word, the “Wr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “e” is short, the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/reh-k/ – /ɹɛ.k/ – Notice also that the “k” ending acts as a second syllable –

Wreckless
 – For this word, the “Wr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “ck” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “k” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-less” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa, and the “ss” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “s” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue) & (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/REHK-lihs/ – /ˈɹɛk.lə(ɪ)s/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wrist
– For this word, the “Wr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, and the final “t” is (often) stopped

/RIHS-[t]//ˈɹɪs.[t]/ – Notice also that the “t” ending (when stopped) acts a separate syllable

Write
– For this word, the “Wr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is (often) stopped, and the final “e” is silent

/righ-[t]//ɹʌiː[t]/

Writer
– For this word, the “Wr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and for the “-er” suffix – the “e” disappears (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RIGH-d’r//ˈɹʌiː.ɾɚ/– Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Writing
 – For this word, the “Wr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the first “i” is pronounced like the “igh” combination, the “t” is a flap-t, and the “-ing” suffix is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “ring” (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/RIGH-ding//ˈɹʌiː.ɾɪŋ/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Written
 – For this word, the “Wr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “i” is short, the “tt” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “t” but is (usually) stopped (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-en” suffix – the “e” turns into an i-schwa (this is the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

– /RIH-[t]ihn//ˈɹɪ.[t]ə(ɪ)n/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

Wrong
– For this word, the “Wr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “song” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue)

/rawng//ˈɹɔŋ/

Wrongly
– For this word, the “Wr” combination is pronounced simply like the single letter “r” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), the “o” is pronounced like the “aw” combination, and the “ng” combination is pronounced like in the word “sing” or “song” (this is the standard pronunciation of this letter combination in The Common Tongue), and for the “-ly” suffix – the final “y” is pronounced like the long letter “e” (this is
the standard pronunciation of this suffix in The Common Tongue)

/rawng//ˈɹɔŋliː/ – Notice also that the stress is on the first syllable

 

– ( American English Pronunciation – Letter W ) –


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